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* AuthorExistenceFailure: Emerson and Lake died in 2016, putting an end to any possibility of further reunions.


** "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in a single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]].
*** In fact, [[http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=3661 the story of "Lucky Man"]] makes the whole of the song a ThrowItIn: the band were one song short of the label's quota on the last day of recording. Lake proceeded to play the ballad he wrote when he was 12, which nobody else was very receptive to but he reminded them they needed one more song. Emerson told him to record it himself and went off to the pub. Lake and Palmer took a first try at the song, and the result was, by their own admission, awful. Lacking any alternatives, Lake overdubbed a bassline onto the song, which suddenly improved it. He then proceeded to overdub more guitars, the choir-like vocal harmonies and an electric guitar solo, with the result being, in his own words, "it sounded pretty good... it sounded like a record". Emerson chose this time to return from the pub and listened to the song, being surprised at how it had gone from a piss-take to being an actual song, and he commented "Wow, I suppose I better play on that!". Lake reminded him the song already had a guitar solo, to which Emerson instead suggested he play over the conclusion, and that he use his recently acquired Moog synthesizer that he hadn't had the chance to test before. Thus, Emerson fetched his Moog synth, asked engineer Eddy Offord to run the tape "as an experiment", and recorded the ending solo in one take.

to:

** "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in a single take, which is something that Emerson's been Emerson was [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]].
*** In fact, [[http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=3661 the story of "Lucky Man"]] makes the ''the whole of the song song'' a ThrowItIn: the band were one song short of the label's quota on the last day of recording. Lake proceeded to play the ballad he wrote when he was 12, which nobody else was very receptive to but he reminded them they needed one more song. Emerson told him to record it himself and went off to the pub. Lake and Palmer took a first try at the song, and the result was, by their own admission, awful. Lacking any alternatives, Lake overdubbed a bassline onto the song, which suddenly improved it. He then proceeded to overdub more guitars, the choir-like vocal harmonies and an electric guitar solo, with the result being, in his own words, "it sounded pretty good... it sounded like a record". Emerson chose this time to return from the pub and listened to the song, being surprised at how it had gone from a piss-take to being an actual song, and he commented said "Wow, I suppose I better play on that!". Lake reminded him the song already had a guitar solo, to which Emerson instead suggested he play over the conclusion, and that he use his recently acquired Moog synthesizer that he hadn't had the chance to test before. Thus, Emerson fetched his Moog synth, asked engineer Eddy Offord to run the tape "as an experiment", and recorded the ending solo in one take.


* ApprovalOfGod: The composer of "Toccata", Alberto Ginastera, praised Emerson, Lake & Palmer's adaptation of it as "diabolical" and said the band had "captured the essence of my music, and no one's ever done that before".

to:

* ApprovalOfGod: The composer of "Toccata", Alberto Ginastera, praised Emerson, Lake & Palmer's adaptation of it as "diabolical" "diabolic" and said the band had "captured the essence of my music, and no one's ever done that before".



* BigNameFan: While they're not exactly critical darlings (their critical reputation has recovered somewhat in recent years), a large number of influential musicians have acknowledged them as influences, including Music/KojiKondo, Music/NobuoUematsu, and Black Francis of The Music/{{Pixies}} (we shit you not).

to:

* BigNameFan: While they're not exactly critical darlings (their critical reputation has recovered somewhat in recent years), a large number of influential musicians have acknowledged them as influences, including Music/KojiKondo, Music/NobuoUematsu, and Black Francis of The Music/{{Pixies}} (we shit you not).Music/{{Pixies}}.


* BigNameFan: While they're not exactly critical darlings (their critical reputation has recovered somewhat in recent years), a large number of influential musicians have acknowledged them as influences, including Music/KojiKondo, Music/NobuoUematsu, and Black Frances of The Music/{{Pixies}} (we shit you not).

to:

* BigNameFan: While they're not exactly critical darlings (their critical reputation has recovered somewhat in recent years), a large number of influential musicians have acknowledged them as influences, including Music/KojiKondo, Music/NobuoUematsu, and Black Frances Francis of The Music/{{Pixies}} (we shit you not).


* BigNameFan: While they're not exactly critical darlings (their critical reputation has recovered somewhat in recent years), a large number of influential musicians have acknowledged them as influences, including Music/KojiKondo, Music/NobuoUematsu, and Frank Black of Music/{{Pixies}} (we shit you not).

to:

* BigNameFan: While they're not exactly critical darlings (their critical reputation has recovered somewhat in recent years), a large number of influential musicians have acknowledged them as influences, including Music/KojiKondo, Music/NobuoUematsu, and Frank Black Frances of The Music/{{Pixies}} (we shit you not).

Added DiffLines:

* BigNameFan: While they're not exactly critical darlings (their critical reputation has recovered somewhat in recent years), a large number of influential musicians have acknowledged them as influences, including Music/KojiKondo, Music/NobuoUematsu, and Frank Black of Music/{{Pixies}} (we shit you not).


* Creator/HRGiger: Did two paintings for ''Brain Salad Surgery''.


* Creator/{{Hipgnosis}}: Did the cover art for ''Trilogy''.


** "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]].

to:

** "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in a single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]].


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** "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in one single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]].

to:

** "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in one in single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]].



** Also, Palmer's [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo]]-esque exclamation "They've only got ham or cheese!" at the end of "Are You Ready Eddy?".

to:

** Also, Palmer's [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo]]-esque {{Music/Ringo|Starr}}-esque exclamation "They've only got ham or cheese!" at the end of "Are You Ready Eddy?".


* CreatorKiller: ''Works'' started their decline, but ''Love Beach'' was the final nail in their coffin. To be fair, they only made it because they owed their label another album and were already planning on disbanding anyway.


* Also, Palmer's [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo]]-esque exclamation "They've only got ham or cheese!" at the end of "Are You Ready Eddy?".

to:

* ** Also, Palmer's [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo]]-esque exclamation "They've only got ham or cheese!" at the end of "Are You Ready Eddy?".


* "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in one single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]].
** In fact, [[http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=3661 the story of "Lucky Man"]] makes the whole of the song a ThrowItIn: the band were one song short of the label's quota on the last day of recording. Lake proceeded to play the ballad he wrote when he was 12, which nobody else was very receptive to but he reminded them they needed one more song. Emerson told him to record it himself and went off to the pub. Lake and Palmer took a first try at the song, and the result was, by their own admission, awful. Lacking any alternatives, Lake overdubbed a bassline onto the song, which suddenly improved it. He then proceeded to overdub more guitars, the choir-like vocal harmonies and an electric guitar solo, with the result being, in his own words, "it sounded pretty good... it sounded like a record". Emerson chose this time to return from the pub and listened to the song, being surprised at how it had gone from a piss-take to being an actual song, and he commented "Wow, I suppose I better play on that!". Lake reminded him the song already had a guitar solo, to which Emerson instead suggested he play over the conclusion, and that he use his recently acquired Moog synthesizer that he hadn't had the chance to test before. Thus, Emerson fetched his Moog synth, asked engineer Eddy Offord to run the tape "as an experiment", and recorded the ending solo in one take.

to:

* ** "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in one single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]].
** *** In fact, [[http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=3661 the story of "Lucky Man"]] makes the whole of the song a ThrowItIn: the band were one song short of the label's quota on the last day of recording. Lake proceeded to play the ballad he wrote when he was 12, which nobody else was very receptive to but he reminded them they needed one more song. Emerson told him to record it himself and went off to the pub. Lake and Palmer took a first try at the song, and the result was, by their own admission, awful. Lacking any alternatives, Lake overdubbed a bassline onto the song, which suddenly improved it. He then proceeded to overdub more guitars, the choir-like vocal harmonies and an electric guitar solo, with the result being, in his own words, "it sounded pretty good... it sounded like a record". Emerson chose this time to return from the pub and listened to the song, being surprised at how it had gone from a piss-take to being an actual song, and he commented "Wow, I suppose I better play on that!". Lake reminded him the song already had a guitar solo, to which Emerson instead suggested he play over the conclusion, and that he use his recently acquired Moog synthesizer that he hadn't had the chance to test before. Thus, Emerson fetched his Moog synth, asked engineer Eddy Offord to run the tape "as an experiment", and recorded the ending solo in one take.


* ThrowItIn: "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in one single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]]. Also, Palmer's [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo]]-esque exclamation "They've only got ham or cheese!" at the end of "Are You Ready Eddy?".

to:

* ThrowItIn: ThrowItIn:
*
"Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in one single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarrassed about]]. Also, Palmer's [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo]]-esque exclamation "They've only got ham or cheese!" at the end of "Are You Ready Eddy?".about]].


Added DiffLines:

* Also, Palmer's [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo]]-esque exclamation "They've only got ham or cheese!" at the end of "Are You Ready Eddy?".


* ApprovalOfGod: The composer of "Toccata", Alberto Ginastera, praised Emerson, Lake & Palmer's adaptation of it as "diabolical" and said the band had "captured the essence of my music, and no one's ever done that before". Music/AaronCopland was also very pleased with their adaptation of "Hoedown" and also liked their adaptation of "Fanfare for the Common Man" (although he didn't consider it as inventive as their version of "Hoedown"). On the reverse side, Keith Emerson was quite complimentary to Music/JordanRudess' covers of "Tarkus" and a few other ELP songs.

to:

* ApprovalOfGod: The composer of "Toccata", Alberto Ginastera, praised Emerson, Lake & Palmer's adaptation of it as "diabolical" and said the band had "captured the essence of my music, and no one's ever done that before".
**
Music/AaronCopland was also very pleased with their adaptation of "Hoedown" and also liked their adaptation of "Fanfare for the Common Man" (although he didn't consider it as inventive as their version of "Hoedown"). "Hoedown").
**
On the reverse side, Keith Emerson was quite complimentary to Music/JordanRudess' covers of "Tarkus" and a few other ELP songs.



* ThrowItIn: "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in one single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarassed about]]. Also, Palmer's [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo]]-esque exclamation "They've only got ham or cheese!" at the end of "Are You Ready Eddy?".

to:

* ThrowItIn: "Lucky Man" - the synth solo was recorded in one single take, which is something that Emerson's been [[CreatorBacklash embarassed embarrassed about]]. Also, Palmer's [[Music/RingoStarr Ringo]]-esque exclamation "They've only got ham or cheese!" at the end of "Are You Ready Eddy?".

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