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* The original one is Yata-Garasu. Despite only having 200 attack points, it possesses the ability to make your opponent skip their draw phase when it does damage. But its low attack makes it easy to destroy right? Wrong. It also possesses the spirit characteristic with means it returns to its owner's hand at the end phase. Of particular note is the combo with Chaos Emperor Dragon and Sangan in the old days. After triggering CED's effect while your Sangan is on the field, Sangan hits the graveyard and triggers its tutor effect, allowing you to retrieve Yata, and assuming you haven't used your normal summon for the turn yet, leaving you free to summon it and attack. Not only is your opponent unable to draw, but their hand was just emptied by the effect of Chaos Emperor Dragon, resulting in a guaranteed win. Such was the brokenness of the combo that Konami saw fit to ban BOTH, with Yata still banned.
* ''Jinzo'' was one of the most devastating cards to ever be published around the time of its release (2000). Its effect of negating traps was borderline insane in a time when most decks needed to rely on permanent traps in order to successfully advance their own combo's and especially to counter devastating cards (such as Raigeki (with Magic Jammer) or Blue Eyes White Dragon (with Trap Hole)) of the opponent. The card also had some decent ATK (2400 to be exact) and only required one tribute to be summoned, which meant that it could easily dominate the field. The hatred towards it has however calmed down around 2008 when decks started to rely more on special summoning and cards such as "Stardust Dragon" could counter devastating cards without being rendered useless by Jinzo. Nowadays you can play easily 3 copies of it, but do not expect it to come in handy, except to negate the occasional "Mirror Force".

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* The original one is Yata-Garasu. Despite only having 200 attack points, it possesses the ability to make your opponent skip their draw phase when it does damage. But its low attack makes it easy to destroy right? Wrong. It also possesses the spirit characteristic with means it returns to its owner's hand at the end phase. Of particular note is the combo with Chaos Emperor Dragon and Sangan in the old days. After triggering CED's effect while your Sangan is on the field, Sangan hits the graveyard and triggers its tutor effect, allowing you to retrieve Yata, and assuming you haven't used your normal summon for the turn yet, leaving you free to summon it and attack. Not only is your opponent unable to draw, but their hand was just emptied by the effect of Chaos Emperor Dragon, resulting in a guaranteed win. Such was the brokenness of the combo that Konami saw fit to ban BOTH, with Yata still banned.
banned and CED only coming back after a nerf.
* ''Jinzo'' was one of the most devastating cards to ever be published around the time of its release (2000). Its effect of negating traps was borderline insane in a time when most decks needed to rely on permanent traps in order to successfully advance their own combo's and especially to counter devastating cards (such as Raigeki (with Magic Jammer) or Blue Eyes White Dragon (with Trap Hole)) of the opponent. The card also had some decent ATK (2400 to be exact) and only required one tribute to be summoned, which meant that it could easily dominate the field. The hatred towards it has however calmed down around 2008 when decks started to rely more on special summoning and cards such as "Stardust Dragon" could counter devastating cards without being rendered useless by Jinzo. Nowadays you can play easily 3 copies of it, but do not expect it to come in handy, except to negate only because the occasional "Mirror Force".game's exponential power creep has made Jinzo's stats along with Trap Cards in general almost completely obsolete.


* Some mechanics take time to be good, but [[MagikarpPower Geminis]] are particularly long-suffering. Their thing is that when Summoned or in the Graveyard, they're treated as Normal Monsters, and then you can burn a Normal Summon to turn them into Effect Monsters. In theory? A versatile set of cards that can take advantage of Normal Monster support while also boasting abnormally powerful effects. In practice? Slow, inefficient, and dead in the water. Being unable to be treated as Normals in the hand or deck limits the Normal support that can help them, since many of the best Normal cards are searchers or require one in the hand. Most Geminis have effects that would be okay in their time if they ''didn't'' require the Gemini Summon, and they overall don't have much synergy. On top of that, the mechanic ''hates'' PowerCreep, since shorter Duels mean that its precious Normal Summons become even more of an opportunity cost. Only a handful of Geminis have ever seen competitive play, and only one notable deck (Gigavise) actually made much use of the mechanic. The only recent decks to involve Geminis are Red-Eyes (which still often sticks to vanillas) and Chemicritters (which have a Field Spell that seems designed to solve all possible Gemini problems), and both are generally seen as tolerable at best.

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* Some mechanics take time to be good, but [[MagikarpPower Geminis]] are particularly long-suffering. Their thing is that when Summoned or in the Graveyard, they're treated as Normal Monsters, and then you can burn a Normal Summon to turn them into Effect Monsters. In theory? A versatile set of cards that can take advantage of Normal Monster support while also boasting abnormally powerful effects. In practice? Slow, inefficient, and dead in the water. Being unable to be treated as Normals in the hand or deck limits the Normal support that can help them, since many of the best Normal cards are searchers or require one in the hand. Most Geminis have of the initial Gemini Monsters had middling base stats so they'd be overshadowed even by Normal Monsters of their time, and the effects that would be okay in their time if they ''didn't'' require gain for spending an additional Normal Summon were too weak to be worth the Gemini Summon, and they overall don't have much synergy.investment. On top of that, the mechanic ''hates'' PowerCreep, since shorter Duels mean that its precious Normal Summons become even more of an opportunity cost. Only a handful of Geminis have ever seen competitive play, and only one notable deck (Gigavise) actually made much use of the mechanic. The only recent decks to involve Geminis are Red-Eyes (which still often sticks to vanillas) and Chemicritters (which have a Field Spell that seems designed to solve all possible Gemini problems), and both are generally seen as tolerable at best.


* [[TheCorruption Malefics]] introduced in ''Anime/YugiohBondsBeyondTime'' are a set of corrupted fan-favorite dragons that may have some of the most self-lobotomizing effects in the entire game. Similar to the Guardians, they can't be summoned at all unless the player banishes their non-Malefic counterpart card from their hand or deck, which makes summoning the ones based on Main Deck monsters a complete pain, as the main deck monster in question is almost always a dead draw and turns its own Malefic into a dead draw if it's put out of reach somehow (the Extra Deck Malefics at least don't have this issue). When brought out, all the player gets is a beater that has no beneficial effects, but plenty of detrimental ones including the prevention of their other monsters from attacking, locking out the summoning of other Malefic monsters, and is destroyed if there is no field spell. While Malefic Stardust Dragon saw some play in competitive Gravekeeper decks (whose heart and soul is their field spell Necrovalley) [[NotCompletelyUseless thanks to its field spell protection effect]] and Malefic Cyber End Dragon sometimes gets run as an easy 4000 ATK beatstick in decks that lack such an option, the Malefics' own field spell Malefic World is a joke, only providing a randomized search effect in place of the draw step. It's also required for summoning their Synchro boss Monster that has a fantastic Synchro monster recycling effect, but it's automatically destroyed without Malefic World. Despite having a unique tuner that uses monsters from the hand for a Synchro Summon, a pure Malefic deck is completely unreliable with their laundry list of restrictions. The most you'll ever see them used today is as high-Rank Xyz fodder, and even then, there are better options.

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* [[TheCorruption Malefics]] introduced in ''Anime/YugiohBondsBeyondTime'' ''Anime/YuGiOhBondsBeyondTime'' are a set of corrupted fan-favorite dragons that may have some of the most self-lobotomizing effects in the entire game. Similar to the Guardians, they can't be summoned at all unless the player banishes their non-Malefic counterpart card from their hand or deck, which makes summoning the ones based on Main Deck monsters a complete pain, as the main deck monster in question is almost always a dead draw and turns its own Malefic into a dead draw if it's put out of reach somehow (the Extra Deck Malefics at least don't have this issue). When brought out, all the player gets is a beater that has no beneficial effects, but plenty of detrimental ones including the prevention of their other monsters from attacking, locking out the summoning of other Malefic monsters, and is destroyed if there is no field spell. While Malefic Stardust Dragon saw some play in competitive Gravekeeper decks (whose heart and soul is their field spell Necrovalley) [[NotCompletelyUseless thanks to its field spell protection effect]] and Malefic Cyber End Dragon sometimes gets run as an easy 4000 ATK beatstick in decks that lack such an option, the Malefics' own field spell Malefic World is a joke, only providing a randomized search effect in place of the draw step. It's also required for summoning their Synchro boss Monster that has a fantastic Synchro monster recycling effect, but it's automatically destroyed without Malefic World. Despite having a unique tuner that uses monsters from the hand for a Synchro Summon, a pure Malefic deck is completely unreliable with their laundry list of restrictions. The most you'll ever see them used today is as high-Rank Xyz fodder, and even then, there are better options.


* Handtraps don't get a lot of love from the playerbase, but they're mostly seen as necessary to control PowerCreep. And then there's Ash Blossom and Joyous Spring. Her effect is that she can be discarded to stop an effect that searches from the deck, Special Summons from the deck, or sends from the deck to the Graveyard. In a game where speed and consistency are vital, that one missed search or summon can decide an entire game, and shut down slower decks which lack more than a few consistency options. And even without that, she's also a Tuner, giving her added versatility when she isn't denying your opponent their best cards. Oh, and in the TCG, [[BribingYourWayToVictory she's a Secret Rare.]] Have fun!

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* Handtraps don't get a lot of love from the playerbase, but they're mostly seen as necessary to control PowerCreep. And then there's Ash Blossom and Joyous Spring. Her effect is that she can be discarded to stop an effect that searches from the deck, Special Summons from the deck, or sends from the deck to the Graveyard. In a game where speed and consistency are vital, that one missed search or summon can decide an entire game, and shut down slower decks which lack more than a few consistency options. And even without that, she's also a Tuner, giving her added versatility when she isn't denying your opponent their best cards. Oh, and in the TCG, What's more, [[BribingYourWayToVictory not only was she orginally a Secret Rare in the TCG,]] but despite being reprinted multiple times, she's a Secret Rare.]] still the most expensive card in any set she's in. Have fun!

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** Chaos Emperor Dragon returns to the game limited to 1. However, it received a drastic card effect change (errata) on November 2018 that not only weakened the card's effect, but greatly restricted the use of the card. The burn damage only applies to how much your opponent's card has, thus a lot less damage inflicted. The effect can ONLY be used if you did not use any card effect, breaking all combos this card would have done in that turn including Witch and Sangan. Since its return, "priority" to its effect no longer applies due to that rule change in 2011 (OCG) and 2012 (TCG), so you can't activate its effect if cards like Bottomless Trap Hole are used in response to the summon.


* Tour Guide From the Underworld. It's a level 3 fiend that can summon another level 3 fiend from the deck when normal summoned at the cost of negated effect and cant be used as Synchro material. Doesn't matter when you summoned Sangan, which activates in the graveyard resulted in searching your keycard. The second restriction? Use it for Xyz summon instead. The fact that it is so rare and expensive crank this UpToEleven.

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* Tour Guide From the Underworld. It's a level 3 fiend that can summon another level 3 fiend from the deck when normal summoned at the cost of negated effect and cant can't be used as Synchro material. Doesn't matter when you summoned Sangan, which activates in the graveyard resulted in searching your keycard. The second restriction? Use it for Xyz summon instead. The fact that it is so rare and expensive crank this UpToEleven.


* Firewall Dragon has ascended to becoming the most singularly loathed protagonist monster of all time among the card-game-playing fanbase. It has very generic requirements, making it feasible in pretty much any deck, usable stats, and two great effects. The first is a bounce effect that can allow for both getting rid of an opponent's problem cards and recycling your own cards, and the second allows you to summon a monster from your hand whenever a monster it points to is sent to the Graveyard. This makes it an absurdly versatile card, capable of starting combos, keeping combos going, and turning a duel around - and what's more, while the first effect has a use limitation on it, the second effect ''doesn't.'' This last detail makes the card far more powerful than it should be, allowing its effect to be potentially looped and go on forever. The card broke new ground by being the first protagonist ace monster to ever be limited to one, after it was discovered just how laughably broken three Firewalls could be, and even when limited to one, it's still become a deadly cog in the machine of multiple FTK decks. But what pushes it here is that the card is the ace monster of the protagonist of ''Anime/YuGiOhVRAINS'', and has survived many banlists while other cards involved in those FTK decks have been banned or limited, meaning the fanbase sees it as surviving not because it's balanced, but [[ProtectionFromEditors because Konami wouldn't ban or errata Yusaku's ace, but as of the Dec 3rd 2018 banlist Firewall Dragon is banned in the TCG]]

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* Firewall Dragon has ascended to becoming the most singularly loathed protagonist monster of all time among the card-game-playing fanbase. It has very generic requirements, making it feasible in pretty much any deck, usable stats, and two great effects. The first is a bounce effect that can allow for both getting rid of an opponent's problem cards and recycling your own cards, and the second allows you to summon a monster from your hand whenever a monster it points to is sent to the Graveyard. This makes it an absurdly versatile card, capable of starting combos, keeping combos going, and turning a duel around - and what's more, while the first effect has a use limitation on it, the second effect ''doesn't.'' This last detail makes the card far more powerful than it should be, allowing its effect to be potentially looped and go on forever. The card broke new ground by being the first protagonist ace monster to ever be limited to one, after it was discovered just how laughably broken three Firewalls could be, and even when limited to one, it's still become a deadly cog in the machine of multiple FTK decks. But what pushes it here is that the card is the ace monster of the protagonist of ''Anime/YuGiOhVRAINS'', and has survived many banlists while other cards involved in those FTK decks have been were banned or limited, meaning the fanbase sees saw it as surviving not because it's balanced, but [[ProtectionFromEditors because Konami wouldn't ban or errata Yusaku's ace, but as of the Dec 3rd 2018 banlist Firewall Dragon is ace]]. It was finally banned in the TCG]]TCG in early December, becoming the first card of that stature to face the list.



* Sparks, one of the first burn cards ever released, did 200 damage. Even as a card released in the first set ever, this was pathetic, as players start with 8000 LP. It would take three Sparks to deal the damage of an attack from the weakest monsters in that set. Worse for Sparks, in an early example of PowerCreep, the following sets released multiple cards that were strictly better; Raimei did 300 damage, Hinotama 500, Final Flame 600, and Ookazi 800. To add insult to injury, when the sets were combined for international release, Sparks found itself packed with its own bigger brothers, meaning it was literally outclassed the day it was released. Very rarely, it gets played by particularly new or desperate players.

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* Sparks, one of the first burn cards ever released, did 200 damage. Even as a card released in the first set ever, this was pathetic, as players start with 8000 LP. It would take three Sparks to deal the damage of an attack from the weakest monsters in that set. Worse for Sparks, in an early example of PowerCreep, the following sets released multiple cards that were strictly better; Raimei did 300 damage, Hinotama 500, Final Flame 600, and Ookazi 800. To add insult to injury, when the sets were combined for international release, Sparks found itself packed with its own bigger brothers, meaning it was literally outclassed the day it was released. Very rarely, it gets played by particularly new or desperate players.[[CherryTapping Winning a duel with Sparks]] is actually a special challenge in some games.



** The very first case of this trope was Larvae Moth, in the second set released internationally. Larvae Moth is pretty hard to play - you have to have an extremely weak Petit Moth out, then use Cocoon of Evolution on it (increasing its defensive stats from awful to just mediocre), wait exactly two turns, and tribute both Petit Moth and Cocoon Of Evolution on it. The end result is... 500 AK, 400 DEF. Yes, a card that's considerably harder to summon than a normal Level 7+ monster has worse stats than many monsters that don't require anything to play. This summoning requirement also means that Larvae Moth is an Effect Monster, so it doesn't get Normal Monster support (the sole redeeming factor for most JokeCharacter cards). It's also Larvae Moth's only effect. It's the only card where [[TheWikiRule the wiki's]] "Tips" section [[DamnedByFaintPraise actively suggests discarding it for a cost]]. Even today, it's considered one of the worst cards ever made.
** The next card they could summon is [[https://yugipedia.com/wiki/Great_Moth Great Moth]], which has 2600 attack, passable, but not great for a level 8 at the time, but requires waiting four of your turns to summon. You might as well set cocoon of evolution and just tribute the duo for Blue Eyes White Dragon if you can keep them alive for that long.

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** The very first case of this trope was Larvae Moth, in the second set released internationally. Larvae Moth is pretty hard to play - you have to have an extremely weak Petit Moth out, then use Cocoon of Evolution on it (increasing its defensive stats from awful to just mediocre), wait exactly two turns, and tribute both Petit Moth and Cocoon Of Evolution on it. The end result is... 500 AK, ATK, 400 DEF. Yes, a card that's considerably harder to summon than a normal Level 7+ monster has worse monster, and the stats than many monsters that don't require anything to play.of a Level 1. This summoning requirement also means that Larvae Moth is an Effect Monster, so it doesn't get Normal Monster support (the sole redeeming factor for most JokeCharacter cards). It's also Larvae Moth's only effect. It's the only card where [[TheWikiRule the wiki's]] "Tips" section [[DamnedByFaintPraise actively suggests discarding it for a cost]]. Even today, it's considered one of the worst cards ever made.
** The next card they could summon is [[https://yugipedia.com/wiki/Great_Moth Great Moth]], which has 2600 attack, passable, but not great for a level 8 at the time, but requires waiting four of your turns to summon. You Even in the era, you might as well set cocoon Cocoon of evolution Evolution and just tribute the duo for Blue Eyes White Dragon if you can keep them alive for that long.


* [[http://yugipedia.com/wiki/Batteryman_C Batteryman C]] is an earlier [[ShockAndAwe Battery]][[ZergRush man]] monster unanimously seen as campfire fodder by the community. You would think that it should support its fellow Batteryman cards, but its ATK and DEF buff effect only works on ''Machine''-type monsters, while all Batteryman monsters are ''Thunder''-type. Its level of two makes it useless for Synchro and XYZ summoning with other Batteryman, and it is not even considered for Machine-focused decks due to its 0 ATK value, meaning the opponent can easily attack it for game with a high ATK monster. Rubbing salt on the wound is that the buffs from multiple Batteryman C's don't stack, so three on the field only gives out 1500 ATK, not 4500 ATK which may have made playing them worth the effort. Simply put, the only days in the sun it gets are when players misread which monsters get the attack boost, and even then, Batterymen have much, much better ways to boost their ATK.

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* [[http://yugipedia.com/wiki/Batteryman_C Batteryman C]] is an earlier [[ShockAndAwe Battery]][[ZergRush man]] monster unanimously seen as campfire fodder by the community. You would think that it should support its fellow Batteryman cards, but its ATK and DEF buff effect only works on ''Machine''-type monsters, while all Batteryman monsters are ''Thunder''-type. Its level of two makes it useless for Synchro and XYZ summoning with other Batteryman, and it is not even considered for Machine-focused decks due to its 0 ATK value, meaning the opponent can easily attack it for game with a high ATK monster. Rubbing salt on the wound is that the buffs from multiple Batteryman C's don't stack, so three on the field only gives out 1500 ATK, not 4500 ATK which may have made playing them worth the effort. Simply put, the The only days in the sun it gets are when players misread which monsters get the attack boost, and even then, Batterymen have much, much better ways to boost their ATK.


* Reborn Tengu has, again, insane synergy with synchros. When it's removed from the field, whether by being attacked and destroyed, returned to your hand, being [[DeaderThanDead banished]] or sent to the grave for a synchro summon, you grab another from your deck. Combine this with the fact that the other requirement for the synchro summon, a tuner monster, can be laughably easy to summon and T.G. Hyper Librarian (''another'' tier induced scrappy) who lets you draw for each synchro summon you make (and can be made with a tengu and the most spammable tuners in the game) and you have yourself a deck that can explode into victory if you draw a tengu. Reborn Tengu got Semi-Limited from the March 2012 banned list onwards.

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* Reborn Tengu has, again, insane synergy with synchros. When it's removed from the field, whether by being attacked and destroyed, returned to your hand, being [[DeaderThanDead banished]] or sent to the grave for a synchro summon, you grab another from your deck. Combine this with the fact that the other requirement for the synchro summon, a tuner monster, can be laughably easy to summon and T.G. Hyper Librarian (''another'' tier induced scrappy) who lets you draw for each synchro summon you make (and can be made with a tengu and the most spammable tuners in the game) and you have yourself a deck that can explode into victory if you draw a tengu. Reborn Tengu got Semi-Limited from the March 2012 banned list onwards.banlist, and wouldn't be unlimited until years later.



* Firewall Dragon has ascended to becoming the most singularly loathed protagonist monster of all time among the card-game-playing fanbase. It has very generic requirements, making it feasible in pretty much any deck, usable stats, and two great effects. The first is a bounce effect that can allow for both getting rid of an opponent's problem cards and recycling your own cards, and the second allows you to summon a monster from your hand whenever a monster it points to is sent to the Graveyard. This makes it an absurdly versatile card, capable of starting combos, keeping combos going, and turning a duel around - and what's more, while the first effect has a use limitation on it, the second effect ''doesn't.'' This last detail makes the card far more powerful than it should be, allowing its effect to be potentially looped and go on forever. The card broke new ground by being the first protagonist ace monster to ever be limited to one, after it was discovered just how laughably broken three Firewalls could be, and even when limited to one, it's still become a deadly cog in the machine of multiple FTK decks. But what pushes it here is that the card is the ace monster of the protagonist of ''Anime/YuGiOhVRAINS'', and has survived many banlists while other cards involved in those FTK decks have been banned or limited, meaning the fanbase sees it as surviving not because it's balanced, but [[ProtectionFromEditors because Konami won't ban or errata Yusaku's ace]].

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* Firewall Dragon has ascended to becoming the most singularly loathed protagonist monster of all time among the card-game-playing fanbase. It has very generic requirements, making it feasible in pretty much any deck, usable stats, and two great effects. The first is a bounce effect that can allow for both getting rid of an opponent's problem cards and recycling your own cards, and the second allows you to summon a monster from your hand whenever a monster it points to is sent to the Graveyard. This makes it an absurdly versatile card, capable of starting combos, keeping combos going, and turning a duel around - and what's more, while the first effect has a use limitation on it, the second effect ''doesn't.'' This last detail makes the card far more powerful than it should be, allowing its effect to be potentially looped and go on forever. The card broke new ground by being the first protagonist ace monster to ever be limited to one, after it was discovered just how laughably broken three Firewalls could be, and even when limited to one, it's still become a deadly cog in the machine of multiple FTK decks. But what pushes it here is that the card is the ace monster of the protagonist of ''Anime/YuGiOhVRAINS'', and has survived many banlists while other cards involved in those FTK decks have been banned or limited, meaning the fanbase sees it as surviving not because it's balanced, but [[ProtectionFromEditors because Konami won't wouldn't ban or errata Yusaku's ace]].ace, but as of the Dec 3rd 2018 banlist Firewall Dragon is banned in the TCG]]


* Blaze Fenix, the Burning Bombardment Bird, a completely unremarkable fusion from the 5Ds manga, earned a strong hatedom for its habit of being the main playmaker in multiple FTK builds. Though no big deal in most decks due to its weird requirements and bland ability, with proper, lengthy setup and a deck with essentially no endgame aside from summoning it, three Blaze Fenix summons could deal 9000 damage or more on the first turn. The fact that multiple cards have been banned or limited due to being involved in Blaze Fenix FTK decks, its complete lack of usage outside of those [=FTKs=], and the fact that Blaze Fenix itself remains unlimited, has made it one of the most common requests for banning in the game, and left most fans completely baffled that it remains alive and kicking. It's limited in the OCG, at least, which makes the FTK a lot trickier.

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* Blaze Fenix, the Burning Bombardment Bird, a completely unremarkable fusion from the 5Ds manga, earned a strong hatedom for its habit of being the main playmaker in multiple FTK builds. Though no big deal in most decks due to its weird requirements and bland ability, with proper, lengthy setup and a deck with essentially no endgame aside from summoning it, three Blaze Fenix summons could deal 9000 damage or more on the first turn. The fact that multiple cards have been banned or limited due to being involved in Blaze Fenix FTK decks, its complete lack of usage outside of those [=FTKs=], and the fact that Blaze Fenix itself remains unlimited, has made it one of the most common requests for banning in the game, and left most fans completely baffled that it remains alive and kicking. It's limited in the OCG, at least, which makes the FTK a lot trickier.
* Firewall Dragon has ascended to becoming the most singularly loathed protagonist monster of all time among the card-game-playing fanbase. It has very generic requirements, making it feasible in pretty much any deck, usable stats, and two great effects. The first is a bounce effect that can allow for both getting rid of an opponent's problem cards and recycling your own cards, and the second allows you to summon a monster from your hand whenever a monster it points to is sent to the Graveyard. This makes it an absurdly versatile card, capable of starting combos, keeping combos going, and turning a duel around - and what's more, while the first effect has a use limitation on it, the second effect ''doesn't.'' This last detail makes the card far more powerful than it should be, allowing its effect to be potentially looped and go on forever. The card broke new ground by being the first protagonist ace monster to ever be limited to one, after it was discovered just how laughably broken three Firewalls could be, and even when limited to one, it's still become a deadly cog in the machine of multiple FTK decks. But what pushes it here is that the card is the ace monster of the protagonist of ''Anime/YuGiOhVRAINS'', and has survived many banlists while other cards involved in those FTK decks have been banned or limited, meaning the fanbase sees it as surviving not because it's balanced, but [[ProtectionFromEditors because Konami won't ban or errata Yusaku's ace]].


* What happens when you staple together [[ScrappyMechanic coin flip effects]] and an all-risk-small-reward factor onto an archetype? You get the [[TarotMotifs Arcana]] [[LightIsNotGood Force]], which are all based on doing coin-flips to gain a beneficial effect when landing heads, and dish out a detrimental effect onto their player when landing tails. Needless to say, playing the deck is a LuckBasedMission in which heads results yield an underpowered and slow deck with underwhelming monster effects, and tails results quickly degrade into an automatic loss. While they do have powerful beatsticks in the EX monsters, they require three tributes to summon, when most of the time Arcana Force is lucky just to have one monster survive the opponent's turn. The only card that saw some play was Arcana Force XXI - The World for its ExtraTurn-lock down effect, but it was used in faster decks that went as far away as possible from the monster's lineage.

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* What happens when you staple together [[ScrappyMechanic coin flip effects]] and an all-risk-small-reward factor onto an archetype? You get the [[TarotMotifs Arcana]] [[LightIsNotGood Force]], which are all based on doing coin-flips to gain a beneficial effect when landing heads, and dish out a detrimental effect onto their player when landing tails. Needless to say, playing the deck is a LuckBasedMission in which heads results yield an underpowered and slow deck with underwhelming monster effects, and tails results quickly degrade into an automatic loss. While they do have powerful beatsticks in the EX monsters, they require three tributes to summon, when most of the time Arcana Force is lucky just to have one monster survive the opponent's turn. The only card that saw some play was Arcana Force XXI - The World for its ExtraTurn-lock down effect, but it was used in faster decks that went as far away as possible from the monster's lineage. The real nail in the coffin with the Arcana Force archetype is simply the chance isn't worth taking. In Yu-Gi-Oh, for players to take the chance with effects, the benefits had to be worth the risk; but the Arcana Force monsters had effects that barely benefited the player at best or severely crippled the player at worst.


* Handtraps don't get a lot of love from the playerbase, but they're mostly seen as necessary to control PowerCreep. And then there's Ash Blossom and Joyous Spring. Her effect is that she can be discarded to stop an effect that searches from the deck, sends from the deck, or sends from the deck to the Graveyard. In a game where speed and consistency are vital, that one missed search or summon can decide an entire game, and shut down slower decks which lack more than a few consistency options. And even without that, she's also a Tuner, giving her added versatility when she isn't denying your opponent their best cards. Oh, and in the TCG, [[BribingYourWayToVictory she's a Secret Rare.]] Have fun!

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* Handtraps don't get a lot of love from the playerbase, but they're mostly seen as necessary to control PowerCreep. And then there's Ash Blossom and Joyous Spring. Her effect is that she can be discarded to stop an effect that searches from the deck, sends Special Summons from the deck, or sends from the deck to the Graveyard. In a game where speed and consistency are vital, that one missed search or summon can decide an entire game, and shut down slower decks which lack more than a few consistency options. And even without that, she's also a Tuner, giving her added versatility when she isn't denying your opponent their best cards. Oh, and in the TCG, [[BribingYourWayToVictory she's a Secret Rare.]] Have fun!


!High Tiers

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!High TiersWith over thousands of cards that continues to churn out new sets, it is inevitable that there will always be a deck that players hate, whether being overpowered, the deck fail to live up to their expectations or just both.

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[[folder:High Tiers]]




!Low Tiers

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\n!Low Tiers[[/folder]]

[[folder:Low Tiers]]




! Both

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\n! Both[[/folder]]

[[folder:Both]]



* [[MagicIdolSinger Trickstars]] by their gameplay focus on [[DeathOfAThousandCuts incremental burn damage]], play disruption, and swarming fall into both ends of the spectrum depending on what they're fighting. Against [[MightyGlacier Defend-the-Castle decks]] it's all over, as Trickstars played by themselves have no outs to boss monsters such as Master Peace, and have to use Eater of Millions and Borreload Dragon to get around them, both are unreliable to breakout and waste cards in the Extra Deck toolbox. However, they trash combo-oriented decks, as if there are enough Trickstars out, the opponent cannot play without burning themselves to a crisp. It is also annoyingly frequent for them to end up losing a vital combo piece to the dreaded Trickstar Reincarnation which banishes and replaces all cards in the opponents hand and burns the opponent for more damage. The deck also has a few degenerate combos involving Lilybell and Firewall Dragon[[note]]As Lilybell can attack directly with monsters on the opponents field, Firewall Dragon can be used to bounce Lilybell from hand to field for dozens of attacks.[[/note]], and the above-mentioned Reincarnation and Droll & Lockbird which leaves the opponent with no hand; while they rarely happen, they guarantee victory and feel abysmal to lose to. For a while, Trickstars as a whole were in a competitive limbo, in which dozens of Trickstar players invade tournaments, but they hardly top in them, until Sky Strikers rolled out and gave Trickstars the tools they lacked. Even then, pure Trickstars induce either white hot rage or easy wins depending on the opposing deck and opening hands.

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* [[MagicIdolSinger Trickstars]] by their gameplay focus on [[DeathOfAThousandCuts incremental burn damage]], play disruption, and swarming fall into both ends of the spectrum depending on what they're fighting. Against [[MightyGlacier Defend-the-Castle decks]] it's all over, as Trickstars played by themselves have no outs to boss monsters such as Master Peace, and have to use Eater of Millions and Borreload Dragon to get around them, both are unreliable to breakout and waste cards in the Extra Deck toolbox. However, they trash combo-oriented decks, as if there are enough Trickstars out, the opponent cannot play without burning themselves to a crisp. It is also annoyingly frequent for them to end up losing a vital combo piece to the dreaded Trickstar Reincarnation which banishes and replaces all cards in the opponents hand and burns the opponent for more damage. The deck also has a few degenerate combos involving Lilybell and Firewall Dragon[[note]]As Lilybell can attack directly with monsters on the opponents field, Firewall Dragon can be used to bounce Lilybell from hand to field for dozens of attacks.[[/note]], and the above-mentioned Reincarnation and Droll & Lockbird which leaves the opponent with no hand; while they rarely happen, they guarantee victory and feel abysmal to lose to. For a while, Trickstars as a whole were in a competitive limbo, in which dozens of Trickstar players invade tournaments, but they hardly top in them, until Sky Strikers rolled out and gave Trickstars the tools they lacked. Even then, pure Trickstars induce either white hot rage or easy wins depending on the opposing deck and opening hands.hands.
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** The very first case of thistrope was Larvae Moth, in the second set released internationally. Larvae Moth is pretty hard to play - you have to have an extremely weak Petit Moth out, then use Cocoon of Evolution on it (increasing its defensive stats from awful to just mediocre), wait exactly two turns, and tribute both Petit Moth and Cocoon Of Evolution on it. The end result is... 500 AK, 400 DEF. Yes, a card that's considerably harder to summon than a normal Level 7+ monster has worse stats than many monsters that don't require anything to play. This summoning requirement also means that Larvae Moth is an Effect Monster, so it doesn't get Normal Monster support (the sole redeeming factor for most JokeCharacter cards). It's also Larvae Moth's only effect. It's the only card where [[TheWikiRule the wiki's]] "Tips" section [[DamnedByFaintPraise actively suggests discarding it for a cost]]. Even today, it's considered one of the worst cards ever made.

to:

** The very first case of thistrope this trope was Larvae Moth, in the second set released internationally. Larvae Moth is pretty hard to play - you have to have an extremely weak Petit Moth out, then use Cocoon of Evolution on it (increasing its defensive stats from awful to just mediocre), wait exactly two turns, and tribute both Petit Moth and Cocoon Of Evolution on it. The end result is... 500 AK, 400 DEF. Yes, a card that's considerably harder to summon than a normal Level 7+ monster has worse stats than many monsters that don't require anything to play. This summoning requirement also means that Larvae Moth is an Effect Monster, so it doesn't get Normal Monster support (the sole redeeming factor for most JokeCharacter cards). It's also Larvae Moth's only effect. It's the only card where [[TheWikiRule the wiki's]] "Tips" section [[DamnedByFaintPraise actively suggests discarding it for a cost]]. Even today, it's considered one of the worst cards ever made.

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