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* In the ''Literature/LeftBehind'' books, it's stated Russia threw almost "its entire nuclear arsenal" at Israel (which was somehow defeated). Either the writers didn't know what "entire arsenal" meant or Russia decided to use nearly 4000 nukes on a country the size of New Jersey.

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* The eponymous of Iain M. Banks's Culture novels have weaponised this notion. It's strongly suspected by other civilisations that their shared "Do not fuck with the Culture" meme actually originates with subtle Culture propaganda. It's true that if you're nice to the Culture it will bend over itself to be even nicer back; it's not above responding to attacks in the same way.
* Another Banks novel, ''The Algebraist'', includes the Dwellers, who seem to be utterly incapable of or even interested in defending themselves. But if you attack them you find that they certainly can defend themselves. And decades or centuries later you'll find a planet accompanied by a swarm of moons, each accompanied by a swarm of asteroids, each accompanied by a swarm of rocks, each... heading directly towards your homeworld at close enough to light speed that you ''might'' have time to say "Oh, fu—".


** Special mention needs to go to the Piecemaker, which is described as "a siege cross-bow that three men couldn't lift, [Detritus] had converted it to fire a thick sheaf of arrows all at once. Mostly they shattered in the air because of the forces involved, and the target was hit by an expanding cloud of burning splinters. Vimes had banned him from using it on people, but it was a damn good way of getting into buildings. It could open the front door and the back door at the same time." Hence, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny "If Mr. Safety Catch is not on, Mr. Crossbow is not your friend."]]

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** Special mention needs to go to the Piecemaker, which is described as "a siege cross-bow that three men couldn't lift, [Detritus] had converted it to fire a thick sheaf of arrows all at once. Mostly they shattered in the air because of the forces involved, and the target was hit by an expanding cloud of burning splinters. Vimes had banned him from using it on people, but it was a damn good way of getting into buildings. It could open the front door and the back door at the same time." Hence, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments "If Mr. Safety Catch is not on, Mr. Crossbow is not your friend."]]


* Creator/RobertAHeinlein disapproves of this trope. As he has Sergeant Zim from ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' comment, war is controlled violence, not killing for its own sake, and there are times where it would as foolish to destroy an enemy city with H-bombs as it would be to punish a baby by decapitating it.

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* Creator/RobertAHeinlein disapproves of this trope. As he has Sergeant Zim from ''Literature/StarshipTroopers'' comment, war is controlled violence, not killing for its own sake, and there are times where it would as foolish to destroy an enemy city with H-bombs as it would be to punish a baby by decapitating it. The same novel has infantry armed with ''2-kiloton nuclear rockets'' (two soldiers per platoon have two ''each'')-and the soldiers are thoroughly instructed to make sure that ''if'' they use them they ''must'' make sure they annihilate the target and nothing else, to the point that in boot camp firing a simulated one by eyeballing rather than with the appropriate computer targeting got Johnnie Rico ''flogged'' and almost drummed out (he ''should'' have court-martialed, flogged and drummed out, but Zim and the other instructors saw him as redeemable and decided not to summon a court martial unless Rico asked, and he was smart enough not to).


* [[spoiler: Tigerstar]]'s death in ''Literature/WarriorCats''. Killed by [[spoiler: having nine internal organs cut through, therefore losing [[CatsHaveNineLives all nine of his leader's lives at once]].]]

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* ''Literature/WarriorCats'':
**
[[spoiler: Tigerstar]]'s death in ''Literature/WarriorCats''.death. Killed by [[spoiler: having nine internal organs cut through, therefore losing [[CatsHaveNineLives all nine of his leader's lives at once]].]]

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* ''Literature/WingsOfFire'': Kestrel's throat was slit, next she was stabbed in the heart with Blister's poisonous tail, and then she was shoved off a cliff into the ocean. However, Kestrel ''might'' have already been dead when she was pushed off the cliff.


* ''Literature/ManKzinWars]'':

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* ''Literature/ManKzinWars]'':''Literature/ManKzinWars'':


* One of the [[Literature/KnownSpace Man-Kzin Wars]] collections contains the story of a ship called ''Catskinner'', which is a crewed ramscoop ship that has a largish number of 500-pound chunks of iron that it drops shortly before reaching its target system. It slows down by hitting the ''star''. For those lacking a grasp of the scale, the effect is like a relativistic shotgun blast the size of an entire star system. This was the ''diversion'' for the real mission, which was to insert (two teams of) assassins to kill the recently arrived representative of the Kzinti central government before he could mount a successful invasion of Earth. This manages to be both overkill (for a diversion) and under-kill given what they ''could'' have done to the system...

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* ''Literature/ManKzinWars]'':
**
One of the [[Literature/KnownSpace Man-Kzin Wars]] collections contains the story of a ship called ''Catskinner'', which is a crewed ramscoop ship that has a largish number of 500-pound chunks of iron that it drops shortly before reaching its target system. It slows down by hitting the ''star''. For those lacking a grasp of the scale, the effect is like a relativistic shotgun blast the size of an entire star system. This was the ''diversion'' for the real mission, which was to insert (two teams of) assassins to kill the recently arrived representative of the Kzinti central government before he could mount a successful invasion of Earth. This manages to be both overkill (for a diversion) and under-kill given what they ''could'' have done to the system...

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* ''Literature/TheMachineriesOfEmpire'': When Kel Command decides that it's time to [[spoiler:get rid of Shuos Jedao]], they send an entire fleet to kill one person. [[spoiler:And she still survives.]]


* In another ''Tabletop/{{Warhammer40000}}'' series, ''Literature/BlackLegion'', "overkill" seems to be Khayon's standard ''modus operandi''.

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* In another ''Tabletop/{{Warhammer40000}}'' ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' series, ''Literature/BlackLegion'', "overkill" seems to be Khayon's standard ''modus operandi''.



* There is a collection of short stories set in the ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' universe that's entitled "Planetkill".

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* There is a collection of short stories set in the ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' ''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000'' universe that's entitled "Planetkill".


** The craziness of Jonathan Teatime in the ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' is established with a recounting of him doing this during an assassination mission. He was supposed to kill an elderly noble, and rather than drugging the guy's dog as would be typical, he nails it to a wall, kills two servants who were witnesses, and kills his victim so violently that his head is several feet from his body. It's a good thing he did the trick with the mirror where you hold it in front of a victim's mouth to check if he's still breathing. Can never be too sure. Hm hm.

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** The craziness of Jonathan Teatime in the ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' is established with a recounting of him doing this during an assassination mission. He was supposed to kill an elderly noble, and rather than drugging the guy's dog as would be typical, he nails it to a wall, the ceiling, kills two servants who were witnesses, and kills his victim so violently that his head is several feet from his body. It's a good thing he did the trick with the mirror where you hold it in front of a victim's mouth to check if he's still breathing. Can never be too sure. Hm hm.


* The craziness of Jonathan Teatime in the ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' is established with a recounting of him doing this during an assassination mission. He was supposed to kill an elderly noble, and rather than drugging the guy's dog as would be typical, he nails it to a wall, kills two servants who were witnesses, and kills his victim so violently that his head is several feet from his body. It's a good thing he did the trick with the spoon where you hold it in front of a victim's mouth to check if he's still breathing. Can never be too sure. Hm hm.
** Special Literature/{{Discworld}} mention needs to go to the Piecemaker, which is described as "a siege cross-bow that three men couldn't lift, [Detritus] had converted it to fire a thick sheaf of arrows all at once. Mostly they shattered in the air because of the forces involved, and the target was hit by an expanding cloud of burning splinters. Vimes had banned him from using it on people, but it was a damn good way of getting into buildings. It could open the front door and the back door at the same time." Hence, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny "If Mr. Safety Catch is not on, Mr. Crossbow is not your friend."]]

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* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}''
**
The craziness of Jonathan Teatime in the ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' is established with a recounting of him doing this during an assassination mission. He was supposed to kill an elderly noble, and rather than drugging the guy's dog as would be typical, he nails it to a wall, kills two servants who were witnesses, and kills his victim so violently that his head is several feet from his body. It's a good thing he did the trick with the spoon mirror where you hold it in front of a victim's mouth to check if he's still breathing. Can never be too sure. Hm hm.
** Special Literature/{{Discworld}} mention needs to go to the Piecemaker, which is described as "a siege cross-bow that three men couldn't lift, [Detritus] had converted it to fire a thick sheaf of arrows all at once. Mostly they shattered in the air because of the forces involved, and the target was hit by an expanding cloud of burning splinters. Vimes had banned him from using it on people, but it was a damn good way of getting into buildings. It could open the front door and the back door at the same time." Hence, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny "If Mr. Safety Catch is not on, Mr. Crossbow is not your friend."]]


* In the ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'' expanded universe human ships ended up carrying salvos of "archer" anti-ship missiles that could devastate a human fleet (one archer could severely damage a destroyer) just to take down the shields of a covenant frigate. Justified that Covenant frigates can withstand tactical nuclear weapons.
** How the Forerunners wage war in ''Literature/TheForerunnerSaga'': Their main tactic is usually to bring literally tens of millions (if not hundreds of millions) of ships and semi-automated drones to bear, and have them sweep across entire star systems in complex, mind-bending patterns. All the while, ancillas and organic Forerunner commanders are simulating the battle possibly quintillions of times, analyzing all possible outcomes and determining the best course of action. Every ship is also making such heavy use of slipspace, that reality itself unravels around the battle, and enemies are prevented from making proper use of FTL travel due to clogged "slipspace channels".

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* In the ''VideoGame/{{Halo}}'' expanded universe ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'':
** The novels show
human ships ended up carrying salvos of "archer" "Archer" anti-ship missiles that could devastate a an entire human fleet (one archer could Archer can severely damage a destroyer) just to take down the shields of a covenant single Covenant frigate. Justified in that Covenant frigates can withstand tactical nuclear weapons.
** How the Forerunners are shown to wage war in ''Literature/TheForerunnerSaga'': Their main tactic is usually to bring literally tens of millions (if not hundreds of millions) of ships and semi-automated drones to bear, and have them sweep across entire star systems in complex, mind-bending patterns. All the while, ancillas and organic Forerunner commanders are simulating the battle possibly quintillions of times, analyzing all possible outcomes and determining the best course of action. Every ship is also making such heavy use of slipspace, that reality itself unravels around the battle, and enemies are prevented from making proper use of FTL travel due to clogged "slipspace channels".

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* Literature/TheCinderSpires sees Master Ferus deal with a home invasion in less than 30 seconds, and to his assistant, the aftereffects shout KillItWithFire ''with her eyes closed''.


* The craziness of Jonathan Teatime in the ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' is established with a recounting of him doing this during an assassination mission. He was supposed to kill an elderly noble, and rather than drugging the guy's dog as would be typical, he [[KickTheDog nails it to a wall]], kills two servants who were witnesses, and kills his victim so violently that his head is several feet from his body.
** It's a good thing he did the trick with the spoon where you hold it in front of a victim's mouth to check if he's still breathing. Can never be too sure. Hm hm.
** Special Literature/{{Discworld}} mention needs to go to the Piecemaker, which is described as "a siege cross-bow that three men couldn't lift, [Detritus] had converted it to fire a thick sheaf of arrows all at once. Mostly they shattered in the air because of the forces involved, and the target was hit by an expanding cloud of burning splinters. Vimes had banned him from using it on people, but it was a damn good way of getting into buildings. It could open the front door and the back door at the same time."
*** Hence, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny "If Mr. Safety Catch is not on, Mr. Crossbow is not your friend."]]

to:

* The craziness of Jonathan Teatime in the ''Discworld/{{Hogfather}}'' is established with a recounting of him doing this during an assassination mission. He was supposed to kill an elderly noble, and rather than drugging the guy's dog as would be typical, he [[KickTheDog nails it to a wall]], wall, kills two servants who were witnesses, and kills his victim so violently that his head is several feet from his body.
**
body. It's a good thing he did the trick with the spoon where you hold it in front of a victim's mouth to check if he's still breathing. Can never be too sure. Hm hm.
** Special Literature/{{Discworld}} mention needs to go to the Piecemaker, which is described as "a siege cross-bow that three men couldn't lift, [Detritus] had converted it to fire a thick sheaf of arrows all at once. Mostly they shattered in the air because of the forces involved, and the target was hit by an expanding cloud of burning splinters. Vimes had banned him from using it on people, but it was a damn good way of getting into buildings. It could open the front door and the back door at the same time."
***
" Hence, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny "If Mr. Safety Catch is not on, Mr. Crossbow is not your friend."]]



* In ''Literature/{{Relativity}},'' the villain Rasmas blows up ''an entire [[AmusementParkOfDoom abandoned amusement park]]'' in an attempt to kill the heroes. [[BondVillainStupidity It doesn't work.]]

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* In ''Literature/{{Relativity}},'' the villain Rasmas blows up ''an entire [[AmusementParkOfDoom abandoned amusement park]]'' in an attempt to kill the heroes. [[BondVillainStupidity It doesn't work.]]


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*''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': When fighting giant scorpions known as "boack" Tiza isn't satisfied until she had dismembered her's. She cuts off the claws, slices its tail clean off, and impales its head.

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