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* TheFagin: Obviously.

to:

* TheFagin: Obviously.Fagin.


* TheArtfulDodger: Well of course. In fact even more so than in the book.

to:

* TheArtfulDodger: Well of course. In fact even Jack Dawkins. Even more so than in the book.

Added DiffLines:

* OdeToFood: "Food, Glorious Food" is sung by the boys in the workhouse about how they're sick of gruel and want to eat all these other foods instead, including hot sausage with mustard, cold jelly and custard, pease pudding, and a great big steak.


* EvenEvilHasStandards: Fagin seems to dislike Bill Sikes's penchant for violence and his treatment of Nancy. The thieves and pickpockets under his care also react with horror when Sikes beats Nancy in front of them. Also, [[spoiler:when Sikes tells the gang that he murdered Nancy, Fagin is visibly horrified and refuses to help him escape]]. Even Bullseye, Sikes' rough and tough guard dog, refuses to follow his master after Nancy is murdered by his master.

to:

* EvenEvilHasStandards: Fagin seems to dislike Bill Sikes's penchant for violence and his treatment of Nancy. The thieves and pickpockets under his care also react with horror when Sikes beats Nancy in front of them. Also, [[spoiler:when Sikes tells the gang that he murdered Nancy, Fagin is visibly horrified and refuses to help him escape]]. Even Bullseye, Sikes' rough and tough guard dog, refuses to follow his master after Nancy is murdered by his master.[[spoiler:he murders Nancy]].


* DomesticAbuser: Bill Sikes to Nancy.

to:

* DomesticAbuser: DomesticAbuse: Bill Sikes to Nancy.

Added DiffLines:

* DeliciousDaydream: The song "Food, Glorious Food" is sung by the boys in the workhouse, who are imagining said glorious food while sick of the gruel they're being served.

Added DiffLines:

* OhCrap: Fagin, when he loses his horde of treasures after tripping on the boards that cross the culvert outside the hideout.


"Would you risk the drop?"\\
"Though your eyes go pop"\\
"When you come down, plop!"

to:

"Would "[[GallowsHumour Would you risk the drop?"\\
"Though
drop?]]"\\
"[[EyeScream Though
your eyes go pop"\\
"When
pop?]]"\\
"[[GallowsHumour When
you come down, plop!"plop!]]"



* DoubleEntendre: The entirety of "Oom-Pah-Pah" is a glorious pileup of double entendres, with [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar just enough subtlety]] to avoid being cut from even the most kid-friendly productions. Though it's up to the viewer to decide whether "oom-pah-pah" is meant to be alcohol, sex, or both.

to:

* DoubleEntendre: The entirety of "Oom-Pah-Pah" is a glorious pileup of double entendres, with [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar just enough subtlety]] to avoid being cut from even the most kid-friendly productions. Though it's up to the viewer to decide whether "oom-pah-pah" is meant to be alcohol, sex, or both. [[spoiler:Considering that it's presented as a drinking song, the former is the most likely, although not by much.]]



* EvenEvilHasStandards: Fagin seems to dislike Bill Sikes's penchant for violence and his treatment of Nancy. The thieves and pickpockets under his care also react with horror when Sikes beats Nancy in front of them. Also, [[spoiler:when Sikes tells the gang that he murdered Nancy, Fagin is visibly horrified and refuses to help him escape]].

to:

* EvenEvilHasStandards: Fagin seems to dislike Bill Sikes's penchant for violence and his treatment of Nancy. The thieves and pickpockets under his care also react with horror when Sikes beats Nancy in front of them. Also, [[spoiler:when Sikes tells the gang that he murdered Nancy, Fagin is visibly horrified and refuses to help him escape]]. Even Bullseye, Sikes' rough and tough guard dog, refuses to follow his master after Nancy is murdered by his master.



* HaveAGayOldTime: "Who Will Buy" sports the line "I'm so high, I swear I could fly." (He's just happy.)

to:

* HaveAGayOldTime: "Who Will Buy" sports has Oliver recite the line "I'm so high, I swear I could fly." (He's This is referring to an ''emotional high'', of course - He's just really happy.)

Added DiffLines:

* AwkwardSilenceEntrance: In the film adaptation, once the Artful Dodger believes Oliver Twist is an ideal fit for Fagin's gang, he drags Oliver through the city into the slums where he lives. When the two of them walk in, the rowdy boys playing card games, practising their tricks or chatting loudly over a cigarette, freeze and stare as Dodger and his guest walk past them towards Fagin's office. One boy is so suspicious, he jumps off a high ledge and lands behind Oliver to get a better look, his landing acting as a JumpScare.

Added DiffLines:

* RelatedInTheAdaptation: Well, not really related, but a verse of “You Got To Pick A Pocket Or Two” mentions that Bill Sikes was one of Fagin’s trainees as a child, while in the book, he was just a robber that Fagin knew.
--> Take a tip from Bill Sikes\\
He can whip what he likes\\
I recall he started small\\
He had to pick a pocket or two

Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationInducedPlotHole: In the original novel, Sikes and Oliver’s failed robbery was Sikes and Fagin’s attempt to corrupt Oliver as part of their and Monks’ plan, as well as to introduce Rose and the Maylies. Here, the robbery holds no affect on the plot, and the people of the house are not seen afterwards.


Added DiffLines:

* MoodWhiplash: When Bill Sikes returns to Fagin’s hideout all bloodied up, Fagin asks him where Nancy is to which Sikes simply replies “She won’t peach on nobody no more.” Shaken, Fagin says he “shouldn’t have done that.”, then about half a minute later, says in a panicked voice “She peached? You sure?”


* BadSamaritan: Fagin, though downplayed from the book. While still somewhat self-serving, he is portrayed as something of a whimsical LoveableRogue who does to some extent care for his gang ([[EvenEvilHasStandards or at least loathes Sikes' treatment of them]]).

to:

* BadSamaritan: Fagin, though downplayed from the book. While still somewhat self-serving, he is portrayed as something of a whimsical LoveableRogue who does to some extent [[TeamDad care for his gang gang]] ([[EvenEvilHasStandards or at least loathes Sikes' treatment of them]]).


TheMovie was released in 1968. It was directed by Creator/CarolReed (''Film/TheThirdMan''). It starred Creator/OliverReed (Carol's nephew) as Bill Sikes, Mark Lester as Oliver (with his songs sung by a girl, Kathe Green), Creator/JackWild as the Artful Dodger and Ron Moody as Fagin. It was the last musical to win the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward for Best Picture until ''Film/{{Chicago}}'' 34 years later, and it remains the ''only'' G-rated movie to win.

to:

TheMovie was released in 1968. It was directed by Creator/CarolReed (''Film/TheThirdMan''). It starred Creator/OliverReed (Carol's nephew) as Bill Sikes, Mark Lester as Oliver (with his songs sung by a girl, Kathe Green), Creator/JackWild as the Artful Dodger and Ron Moody Creator/RonMoody as Fagin. It was the last musical to win the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward for Best Picture until ''Film/{{Chicago}}'' 34 years later, and it remains the ''only'' G-rated movie to win.


* AnimalReactionShot: When Oliver first enters the hideout of Fagin's thieves, everyone stops talking and stares at him, including an owl.



* BreakingTheFourthWall: In a London revival, Fagin breaks the fourth wall during a few of his monologues, especially when he is play acting with his 'treasures'. For example, he was looking through an opera glass and pretending he was at a theatre, gesturing towards the Stalls in the actual theatre (where the most expensive seats are) and mentioning that was where all the rich people were, then gesturing at the top tier and saying that was full of poor people. In the second monologue he started recounting the story of the musical and ended up saying: "What the Dickens am I going on about?"



* CharacterDevelopment: Fagin provides a very interesting case study in the movie adaptation. When Oliver first meets him, he's a loud and frightening stranger who emerges from a cloud of smoke like the very Devil from Hell, bellowing at some random youngster who complains about the food to "Shut up and drink your gin!" Then, as Oliver gets introduced to everyone and he shows him around, Fagin starts looking a lot more like a [[LaughablyEvil comical villain]], particularly during the song "You've Got to Pick a Pocket Or Two" where he hams up his whole GreedyJew motif to pull some laughs. Later, as things get more serious, he reveals in his song "Reviewing the Situation" that he's tired of his whole criminal enterprise and wants out, but truly has nowhere to go, making him quite a sympathetic character indeed. By the end, he's pretty much run the entire range of Jewish villain characterizations from Shakespeare's time to ours.



** "Reviewing The Situation" is first sung by Fagin as he tries and fails to convince himself to abandon his criminal ways, later reprised with the Artful Dodger as they pledge their dedication to a life of crime.
** The ''original'' version has Fagin realizing at the end of each verse that the situation he's imagining is actually ''unimaginable'', so it's debatable how "dark" the reprise is, given that Fagin and Dodger both seem genuinely happy about the prospect:
--->Together till our dying day\\
The living proof that crime can pay
** And also, this is only true in the movie, as in the stage version, this revelation never existed, and he does straighten up his life after all.
** "It's a Fine Life" may be an even better example of this trope. It's first sung by Nancy and Bet as a relatively cheerful song, but is later reprised by Nancy, Bill Sikes, Fagin, and Dodger in a more sarcastic and dark manner.

to:

** "Reviewing The Situation" is first sung by Fagin as he tries and fails to convince himself to abandon his criminal ways, later reprised with the Artful Dodger as they pledge their dedication to a life of crime.
** The ''original'' version has Fagin realizing at the end of each verse that the situation he's imagining is actually ''unimaginable'', so it's debatable how "dark" the reprise is, given that Fagin and Dodger both seem genuinely happy about the prospect:
--->Together till our dying day\\
The living proof that crime can pay
** And also, this is only true in the movie, as in the stage version, this revelation never existed, and he does straighten up his life after all.
** "It's a Fine Life" may be an even better example of this trope. It's is first sung by Nancy and Bet as a relatively cheerful song, but is later reprised by Nancy, Bill Sikes, Fagin, and Dodger in a more sarcastic and dark manner.



* DownerEnding: The only character who has a happy ending is Oliver himself. And that's ''after'' watching Nancy killed by Bill Sikes, who is then shot (or in the film version, as in the original book, accidentally hangs himself) trying to escape with Oliver. Must've been pretty traumatic to be a part of...

to:

* DownerEnding: The only character who has a happy ending is Oliver himself. And that's ''after'' watching Nancy killed by Bill Sikes, who is then shot (or in the film version, as in the original book, accidentally hangs himself) killed trying to escape with Oliver. Must've been pretty traumatic to be a part of...



* EverythingHasRhythm: During "Consider Yourself", most prominently in the film, everyone does this with whatever it is they happen to be doing. Except maybe Dodger and Oliver.

to:

* EverythingHasRhythm: During "Consider Yourself", most prominently in the film, everyone does this with whatever it is they happen to be doing. Except maybe Dodger and Oliver.



* FakeFood: In some productions applesauce stands in for the gruel eaten by the workhouse orphans in the opening scene. It's easy to "set up" (no cooking required), easy to clean off of prop bowls and spoons, is readily gobbled by a group of 8-14 year-old kids, and looks "truly disgusting" from the audience.



* FingerlessGloves: Fagin wears them.
* FlashMobCoverUp: {{Inverted}} in that it's done to prevent a crime. Nancy starts giving out beer and getting her customers to sing a rather lively bawdy ballad, in order to let Oliver, who'd been kidnapped by Sikes, escape unnoticed. It doesn't fool Sikes' dog, however.



* GenderFlip: In some productions, the Artful Dodger is played by a girl.
* GrayRainOfDepression: The rain pours as Oliver wearily tredges a muddy road to London after escaping from Mr. Sowerberry.



** Subverted with [[spoiler:Fagin]] in the movie. He plans to do this, but [[spoiler:instead chooses to leave with Dodger and continue a life of pickpocketing]]. It's rather heartwarming, in a strange way. In the theatre version, however, he plays it straight, deciding that with the breaking up and arrest of his gang, along with the loss of his precious treasures, there has never been a better time to change his ways.

to:

** Subverted with [[spoiler:Fagin]] in Fagin decides at the movie. He plans to do this, but [[spoiler:instead chooses to leave with Dodger and continue a life of pickpocketing]]. It's rather heartwarming, in a strange way. In the theatre version, however, he plays it straight, deciding that end that, with the breaking up and arrest of his gang, along with the loss of his precious treasures, there has never been a better time to change his ways.



* {{Intermission}}: The film version kept the intermission from the stage play. On the DVD, the intermission also doubles as a prompt to turn the disc over to continue the film.
* IrrelevantActOpener: "Oom Pah Pah" is a drinking song. Looks like it's named after everyone's favorite thing, too. The movie version makes it less irrelevant: Nancy leads the crowd in song in order to distract Bill Sikes so she can take Oliver to London Bridge.

to:

* {{Intermission}}: The film version kept the intermission from the stage play. On the DVD, the intermission also doubles as a prompt to turn the disc over to continue the film.
* IrrelevantActOpener: "Oom Pah Pah" is a drinking song. Looks like it's named after everyone's favorite thing, too. The movie version makes it less irrelevant: Nancy leads the crowd in song in order to distract Bill Sikes so she can take Oliver to London Bridge.



* LeaningOnTheFourthWall: In some productions , the lyrics for "Reviewing the Situation" end with "There is no in between for me/But who will change the scene for me?", whereupon the set immediately starts to revolve as Fagin heads back to the fireplace to count his money.



* MediumAwareness: In one production in London, the orchestration uses a violin soloist during "Reviewing the Situation". Since a violin is one of the items that Fagin has in his box of treasures, there were several PlayedForLaughs moments where Fagin, apparently hearing the violin solo, would stop and stare at the violin, and pick it up to examine it. The same part also featured a long monologue by Fagin where he seemed perfectly aware that he was on stage in a theatre.



* NoSongForTheWicked: In the film, Bill Sikes never sings, although other people sing about him.



** Some productions leave [[spoiler:Nancy]]'s death ambiguous, implying there's a chance she survived. The film version leaves no doubt that Sikes killed her.



* ThatRemindsMeOfASong: Nancy starts up "Oom-Pah-Pah" as a distraction to let Oliver escape from Bill Sikes.



* WheelOfPain: The film adaptation briefly shows a variation on the theme during the opening scene.


Added DiffLines:


!!The movie adds examples of:
* AnimalReactionShot: When Oliver first enters the hideout of Fagin's thieves, everyone stops talking and stares at him, including an owl.
* CharacterDevelopment: Fagin provides a very interesting case study in the movie adaptation. When Oliver first meets him, he's a loud and frightening stranger who emerges from a cloud of smoke like the very Devil from Hell, bellowing at some random youngster who complains about the food to "Shut up and drink your gin!" Then, as Oliver gets introduced to everyone and he shows him around, Fagin starts looking a lot more like a [[LaughablyEvil comical villain]], particularly during the song "You've Got to Pick a Pocket Or Two" where he hams up his whole GreedyJew motif to pull some laughs. Later, as things get more serious, he reveals in his song "Reviewing the Situation" that he's tired of his whole criminal enterprise and wants out, but truly has nowhere to go, making him quite a sympathetic character indeed. By the end, he's pretty much run the entire range of Jewish villain characterizations from Shakespeare's time to ours.
* DarkReprise: "Reviewing The Situation" is first sung by Fagin as he tries and fails to convince himself to abandon his criminal ways, later reprised with the Artful Dodger as they pledge their dedication to a life of crime. Though the ''original'' version has Fagin realizing at the end of each verse that the situation he's imagining is actually ''unimaginable'', so it's debatable how "dark" the reprise is, given that Fagin and Dodger both seem genuinely happy about the prospect:
-->Together till our dying day\\
The living proof that crime can pay
* FingerlessGloves: Fagin wears them.
* FlashMobCoverUp: {{Inverted}} in that it's done to prevent a crime. Nancy starts giving out beer and getting her customers to sing a rather lively bawdy ballad, in order to let Oliver, who'd been kidnapped by Sikes, escape unnoticed. It doesn't fool Sikes' dog, however.
* GrayRainOfDepression: The rain pours as Oliver wearily tredges a muddy road to London after escaping from Mr. Sowerberry.
* HeelFaceTurn: Subverted with [[spoiler:Fagin]]. He plans to do this, but [[spoiler:instead chooses to leave with Dodger and continue a life of pickpocketing]].
* {{Intermission}}: The film version kept the intermission from the stage play. On the DVD, the intermission also doubles as a prompt to turn the disc over to continue the film.
* NoSongForTheWicked: In the film, Bill Sikes never sings, although other people sing about him.
* ThatRemindsMeOfASong: Nancy starts up "Oom-Pah-Pah" as a distraction to let Oliver escape from Bill Sikes.
* WheelOfPain: The film adaptation briefly shows a variation on the theme during the opening scene.

!!Other specific productions add examples of:
* BreakingTheFourthWall: In a London revival, Fagin breaks the fourth wall during a few of his monologues, especially when he is play acting with his 'treasures'. For example, he was looking through an opera glass and pretending he was at a theatre, gesturing towards the Stalls in the actual theatre (where the most expensive seats are) and mentioning that was where all the rich people were, then gesturing at the top tier and saying that was full of poor people. In the second monologue he started recounting the story of the musical and ended up saying: "What the Dickens am I going on about?"
* FakeFood: In some productions applesauce stands in for the gruel eaten by the workhouse orphans in the opening scene. It's easy to "set up" (no cooking required), easy to clean off of prop bowls and spoons, is readily gobbled by a group of 8-14 year-old kids, and looks "truly disgusting" from the audience.
* GenderFlip: In some productions, the Artful Dodger is played by a girl.
* LeaningOnTheFourthWall: In some productions , the lyrics for "Reviewing the Situation" end with "There is no in between for me/But who will change the scene for me?", whereupon the set immediately starts to revolve as Fagin heads back to the fireplace to count his money.
* MediumAwareness: In one production in London, the orchestration uses a violin soloist during "Reviewing the Situation". Since a violin is one of the items that Fagin has in his box of treasures, there were several PlayedForLaughs moments where Fagin, apparently hearing the violin solo, would stop and stare at the violin, and pick it up to examine it. The same part also featured a long monologue by Fagin where he seemed perfectly aware that he was on stage in a theatre.
* SparedByTheAdaptation: Some productions leave [[spoiler:Nancy]]'s death ambiguous, implying there's a chance she survived.


* LoveMartyr: Poor Nancy has this BAD for [[CompleteMonster Bill Sikes]]. She recognises this in "As Long As He Needs Me", but even though he's a murderous thug and robber who beats her and plans to kill Oliver, she still can't bring herself to hand him over to the law.

to:

* LoveMartyr: Poor Nancy has this BAD for [[CompleteMonster Bill Sikes]].Sikes. She recognises this in "As Long As He Needs Me", but even though he's a murderous thug and robber who beats her and plans to kill Oliver, she still can't bring herself to hand him over to the law.

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