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--> "Where is my son? I do not see him here before me..."

to:

--> "Where '''Giorgio:''' Where is my son? I do not see him here before me..."



--> "Let's enjoy the wine and the singing,
--> the beautiful night, and the laughter.
--> Let the new day find us in this paradise"

to:

--> "Let's ''"Let's enjoy the wine and the singing,
singing,''
--> the ''the beautiful night, and the laughter.
laughter.''
--> Let ''Let the new day find us in this paradise"paradise."''


In 1983, Franco Zeffirelli directed a film version of the opera, which starred Canadian soprano Teresa Stratas as Violetta, Spanish tenor Plácido Domingo as Alfredo, and American baritone Cornell MacNeil as Giorgio.

to:

In 1983, Franco Zeffirelli directed a film version of the opera, which starred Canadian soprano Teresa Stratas as Violetta, Spanish tenor Plácido Domingo as Alfredo, and American baritone Cornell MacNeil [=MacNeil=] as Giorgio.


* AdaptationNameChange: In Dumas fils' novel, the leading characters are named Marguerite Gauthier and Armand Duval. In Verdi's opera, their names are Violetta Valéry and Alfredo Germont.



* CostumePorn: Due to the opera's setting in Paris, Violetta almost always gets at least one fancy gown: [[http://41.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m5gzkdvre61rprammo1_500.jpg really]], [[https://aprilemillo.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/moffo-as-violetta.jpg fancy]].



* CostumePorn: Due to the opera's setting in Paris, Violetta almost always gets at least one fancy gown: [[http://41.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m5gzkdvre61rprammo1_500.jpg really]], [[https://aprilemillo.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/moffo-as-violetta.jpg fancy]].

to:

* CostumePorn: Due to ** Franco Zeffirelli's film, however, makes the opera's setting in Paris, Violetta almost always gets at least one fancy gown: [[http://41.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m5gzkdvre61rprammo1_500.jpg really]], [[https://aprilemillo.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/moffo-as-violetta.jpg fancy]].final reunion scene a hallucination of Violetta's, ending with her dying all alone.


* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Frequently expressed by Alfredo late in Act II and Act III, when he realizes how profoundly he's wronged the woman who loves him.

to:

* MyGodWhatHaveIDone: Frequently expressed by Alfredo late in Act II and Act III, when he realizes how profoundly he's wronged the woman who loves him. Giorgio gets in on this towards the end as well, realizing he's losing the daughter in law he could have had.

Added DiffLines:

**Inverted in 19th-century productions, when the setting was changed to Paris during the reign of King Louis XIV, because operagoers at the time were not used to seeing the characters dressed almost exactly like themselves.


* DownerEnding: Alfredo manages to track Violetta down, but when he arrives at her side, she's in the last stage of her tuberculosis.
** Which is actually an improvement on the original novel, in which Marguerite (Violetta's original name) died completely alone and forsaken.

to:

* DownerEnding: Alfredo manages to track Violetta down, but when he arrives at her side, she's in the last stage of her tuberculosis. \n** Which This is actually an improvement ''improvement'' on the original novel, in which Marguerite (Violetta's original name) died [[DyingAlone completely alone and forsaken.forsaken]].

Added DiffLines:

It first premiered at the Teatro La Fenice in Venice on March 6th, 1853, where Verdi was forced to relocate the contemporary setting back to the 18th century by the censors, and it wasn't until the 1880's when the original 1850's setting began being used. It has since become one of the most popular operas, and has seen frequent performances around the world.

In 1983, Franco Zeffirelli directed a film version of the opera, which starred Canadian soprano Teresa Stratas as Violetta, Spanish tenor Plácido Domingo as Alfredo, and American baritone Cornell MacNeil as Giorgio.

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2012fm5757.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:Maria Callas as Violetta Valéry]]

Added DiffLines:

* SceneryPorn: It's Paris at the beginning of the 19th century, so the [[https://sfopera.com/contentassets/141a666b5b4c4fd4a268ac7316e5ab5e/00120traviata-x2.jpg Parisian]] [[https://www.fwweekly.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/La-Traviata-Act-I.jpg sets]] will often be very [[https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5172fc5ee4b047d367f5a3ff/t/5ad928a91ae6cf578a61332c/1524181213086/OATraviata_creditJeffBusby1.jpg lavish]] and [[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DdOGvFdW0AEkqQv.jpg gorgeous]].

Added DiffLines:

* SettingUpdate: The opera has seen several updates in many productions. Some examples:
** Francesca Zambello's production moves the setting to the Belle Époque in Paris.
** Some productions update the setting to 1920's Paris as well.

Added DiffLines:

* MoodWhiplash: Invoked at the beginning of Act III, with Violetta dying in the bedroom interrupted by a chorus from the joyous Carnival coming from outside.

Added DiffLines:

* IHaveNoSon: Giorgio's reaction to Alfredo terribly disrespecting Violetta at the end of Act II.
--> "Where is my son? I do not see him here before me..."


* DownerEnding: Alfredo manages to track Violetta down, but when he arrives to her side, she's in the last stage of her tuberculosis.

to:

* DownerEnding: Alfredo manages to track Violetta down, but when he arrives to at her side, she's in the last stage of her tuberculosis.


''La traviata'' is an opera in three acts by Music/GiuseppeVerdi, set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave. It is based on ''La dame aux Camélias'' (1852), a play adapted from the novel by Alexandre Dumas ''fils''. The title "La traviata" means literally ''The Fallen Woman'', or perhaps more figuratively, ''The Woman Who Goes Astray''. It was originally titled ''Violetta'', after the main character." -Wiki/TheOtherWiki. It is a pretty clear inspiration for ''{{Film/Moulin Rouge}}.''

to:

''La traviata'' is an opera in three acts by Music/GiuseppeVerdi, set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave. It is based on ''La dame aux Camélias'' (1852), a play adapted from the novel by Alexandre Dumas ''fils''.Creator/AlexandreDumasFils. The title "La traviata" means literally ''The Fallen Woman'', or perhaps more figuratively, ''The Woman Who Goes Astray''. It was originally titled ''Violetta'', after the main character." -Wiki/TheOtherWiki. It is a pretty clear inspiration for ''{{Film/Moulin Rouge}}.''


''La traviata'' is an opera in three acts by GiuseppeVerdi, set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave. It is based on ''La dame aux Camélias'' (1852), a play adapted from the novel by Alexandre Dumas ''fils''. The title "La traviata" means literally ''The Fallen Woman'', or perhaps more figuratively, ''The Woman Who Goes Astray''. It was originally titled ''Violetta'', after the main character." -Wiki/TheOtherWiki. It is a pretty clear inspiration for ''{{Film/Moulin Rouge}}.''

to:

''La traviata'' is an opera in three acts by GiuseppeVerdi, Music/GiuseppeVerdi, set to an Italian libretto by Francesco Maria Piave. It is based on ''La dame aux Camélias'' (1852), a play adapted from the novel by Alexandre Dumas ''fils''. The title "La traviata" means literally ''The Fallen Woman'', or perhaps more figuratively, ''The Woman Who Goes Astray''. It was originally titled ''Violetta'', after the main character." -Wiki/TheOtherWiki. It is a pretty clear inspiration for ''{{Film/Moulin Rouge}}.''

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