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* NamesTheSame: One of the conspirators is named Cinna. An innocent poet who happens to have the same name loses his life to an angry mob when public opinion turns against the assassination.

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* NamesTheSame: One InUniverse: one of the conspirators is named Cinna. An innocent poet who happens to have the same name loses his life to an angry mob when public opinion turns against the assassination.

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* InsaneTrollLogic: Put briefly:
-->'''Mob:''' Die, Cinna!\\
'''Cinna:''' I'm the poet Cinna, not the Senator Cinna!\\
'''Mob:''' Die for having the same name as Cinna!

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* TornApartByTheMob: The mob that Marc Antony incensed find a poet unfortunate enough to share the name of Cinna, one of the conspirators responsible for Caesar's assassination. Either not hearing or not caring that he is not Cinna the conspirator, they kill him by tearing him to pieces.


In either case, Brutus is intended to be the most sympathetic character in a cast of villains. The title character? An {{Ambitio|nIsEvil}}us DecoyProtagonist. His other closest friend, Mark Antony? Uses his oratory skills to help woo the crowds to handing Caesar power, and when it comes to AvengingTheVillain he really gets nasty, all while acting the part of the FauxAffablyEvil VillainWithGoodPublicity. Octavian/Octavius/Augustus Caesar? Just as ambitious as his dear old uncle, but even smarter, smart enough in fact to maintain his [[VillainWithGoodPublicity good publicity]] throughout the events of the play so that it takes a knowledge of what actually happened afterwards historically (or in ''Theatre/AntonyAndCleopatra'') to realize his [[XanatosPlannedThisIndex villainy.]] Our actual protagonist's other best friend, Cassius? TheResenter to Caesar's power who gets Brutus involved in the conspiracy in the first place by being a ManipulativeBastard, with plans to set himself up as TheManBehindTheMan where Brutus is [[PuppetKing The Man]] whether he wants the job or not; in fact, the less Brutus actually wants the job the easier he thinks it will be. The rest of the conspirators all have their own selfish motivations as well. Oh and the rest of Rome? Anyone who isn't just a victim of one of the villains ends up in the mob formed by Mark Antony's speech due to their [[PowderKegCrowd fickle nature]].

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In either case, Brutus is intended to be the most sympathetic character in a cast of villains. The title character? An {{Ambitio|nIsEvil}}us DecoyProtagonist. His other closest friend, Mark Antony? UsefulNotes/MarkAntony? Uses his oratory skills to help woo the crowds to handing Caesar power, and when it comes to AvengingTheVillain he really gets nasty, all while acting the part of the FauxAffablyEvil VillainWithGoodPublicity. [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Octavian/Octavius/Augustus Caesar? Caesar]]? Just as ambitious as his dear old uncle, but even smarter, smart enough in fact to maintain his [[VillainWithGoodPublicity good publicity]] throughout the events of the play so that it takes a knowledge of what actually happened afterwards historically (or in ''Theatre/AntonyAndCleopatra'') to realize his [[XanatosPlannedThisIndex villainy.]] Our actual protagonist's other best friend, Cassius? TheResenter to Caesar's power who gets Brutus involved in the conspiracy in the first place by being a ManipulativeBastard, with plans to set himself up as TheManBehindTheMan where Brutus is [[PuppetKing The Man]] whether he wants the job or not; in fact, the less Brutus actually wants the job the easier he thinks it will be. The rest of the conspirators all have their own selfish motivations as well. Oh and the rest of Rome? Anyone who isn't just a victim of one of the villains ends up in the mob formed by Mark Antony's speech due to their [[PowderKegCrowd fickle nature]].

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* RantInducingSlight: When Brutus meets with the conspirators for the first time, Cassius's line, "And let us swear our resolution," triggers a 30-line speech from Brutus denigrating oaths as unnecessary. It's unclear if Brutus feels that strongly on the subject, or if he's reacting because he feels that his authority is being subtly challenged by Cassius.

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* AsYouKnow: Caesar explains a famous superstition about Lupercalia to Antony, lest the audience be confused.


* DispenseWithThePleasantries: Caesar in is proud of his hatred of attempts to flatter him.

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* DispenseWithThePleasantries: Caesar in is proud of his hatred of attempts to flatter him.

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* DispenseWithThePleasantries: Caesar in is proud of his hatred of attempts to flatter him.
-->'''Brutus:''' I can o'ersway him; for he loves to hear\\
That unicorns may be betray'd with trees,\\
And bears with glasses, elephants with holes,\\
Lions with toils and men with flatterers;\\
But when I tell him he hates flatterers,\\
He says he does, being then most flattered.


* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: Shakespeare's play has done much to make Marcus Junius Brutus into a Republican hero InternalReformist torn by ConflictingLoyalty. This characterization is entirely Shakespeare's invention and it's very compelling nonetheless as an aesthetic achievement but the real Brutus as per Creator/{{Cicero}}'s letters was a corrupt optimate and LoanShark who extorted interest from the poor by sending goon squads to make them pay up and there's much debate among historians, such as Mary Beard, if Brutus was really going to restore the Republic or merely angling to be another warlord dictator out for his own power[[note]]As Historians point out, one of the signs of autocracy and decay of traditions in Ancient Rome is generals casting coins with their likeness. The first to do this was UsefulNotes/PompeyTheGreat, and Caesar was following suit. If Brutus and Cassius intended to restore the Republic, them casting coins in ''their'' likeness is NotHelpingYourCase, nor is them putting daggers on the obverse, more or less gloating about killing Caesar, which goes against the whole IDidWhatIHadToDo reluctance that has become PopCulturalOsmosis[[/note]].

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* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: Shakespeare's play has done much to make Marcus Junius Brutus into a Republican hero InternalReformist torn by ConflictingLoyalty. This characterization is entirely Shakespeare's invention and it's very compelling nonetheless as an aesthetic achievement but the real Brutus as per Creator/{{Cicero}}'s letters was a corrupt optimate and LoanShark who extorted interest from the poor by sending goon squads to make them pay up and there's much debate among historians, such as Mary Beard, if Brutus was really going to restore the Republic or merely angling to be another warlord dictator out for his own power[[note]]As Historians historians point out, one of the signs of autocracy and decay of traditions in Ancient Rome is generals casting coins with their likeness. The first to do this was UsefulNotes/PompeyTheGreat, and Caesar was following suit. If Brutus and Cassius intended to restore the Republic, them casting coins in ''their'' likeness is NotHelpingYourCase, nor is them putting daggers on the obverse, more or less gloating about killing Caesar, which goes against the whole IDidWhatIHadToDo reluctance that has become PopCulturalOsmosis[[/note]].


In either case, Brutus is intended to be the most sympathetic character in a cast of villains. The title character? An {{Ambitio|nIsEvil}}us DecoyProtagonist. His other closest friend, Mark Antony? Uses his oratory skills to help woo the crowds to handing Caesar power, and when it comes to AvengingTheVillain he really gets nasty, all while acting the part of the FauxAffablyEvil VillainWithGoodPublicity. Octavian/Octavius/Augustus Caesar? Just as ambitious as his dear old uncle, but even smarter, smart enough in fact to maintain his [[VillainWithGoodPublicity good publicity]] throughout the events of the play so that it takes a knowledge of what actually happened afterwards historically (or in Theatre/AntonyAndCleopatra) to realize his [[XanatosPlannedThisIndex villainy.]] Our actual protagonist's other best friend, Cassius? TheResenter to Caesar's power who gets Brutus involved in the conspiracy in the first place by being a ManipulativeBastard, with plans to set himself up as TheManBehindTheMan where Brutus is [[PuppetKing The Man]] whether he wants the job or not; in fact, the less Brutus actually wants the job the easier he thinks it will be. The rest of the conspirators all have their own selfish motivations as well. Oh and the rest of Rome? Anyone who isn't just a victim of one of the villains ends up in the mob formed by Mark Antony's speech due to their [[PowderKegCrowd fickle nature]].

to:

In either case, Brutus is intended to be the most sympathetic character in a cast of villains. The title character? An {{Ambitio|nIsEvil}}us DecoyProtagonist. His other closest friend, Mark Antony? Uses his oratory skills to help woo the crowds to handing Caesar power, and when it comes to AvengingTheVillain he really gets nasty, all while acting the part of the FauxAffablyEvil VillainWithGoodPublicity. Octavian/Octavius/Augustus Caesar? Just as ambitious as his dear old uncle, but even smarter, smart enough in fact to maintain his [[VillainWithGoodPublicity good publicity]] throughout the events of the play so that it takes a knowledge of what actually happened afterwards historically (or in Theatre/AntonyAndCleopatra) ''Theatre/AntonyAndCleopatra'') to realize his [[XanatosPlannedThisIndex villainy.]] Our actual protagonist's other best friend, Cassius? TheResenter to Caesar's power who gets Brutus involved in the conspiracy in the first place by being a ManipulativeBastard, with plans to set himself up as TheManBehindTheMan where Brutus is [[PuppetKing The Man]] whether he wants the job or not; in fact, the less Brutus actually wants the job the easier he thinks it will be. The rest of the conspirators all have their own selfish motivations as well. Oh and the rest of Rome? Anyone who isn't just a victim of one of the villains ends up in the mob formed by Mark Antony's speech due to their [[PowderKegCrowd fickle nature]].

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* DamnedByFaintPraise: Marc Antony calling the assassins "honorable" while eulogizing Caesar's death helps in turning the public consciousness against them.


* DownerEnding: Instead of preserving the Roman Republic, the assassins end up setting the stage for its slow and destructive collapse, and almost all of them are dead after the events at Philippi. That's not even talking about the slew of innocents, such as Cinna the poet, getting killed throughout the story. Making matters worse, the relationship between Antony and Octavian starts to show strains, hinting at [[Theatre/AntonyandCleopatra even more instability to follow]].

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* DownerEnding: Instead of preserving the Roman Republic, the assassins end up setting the stage for its slow and destructive collapse, and almost all of them are dead after the events at Philippi. That's not even talking about the slew of innocents, such as Cinna the poet, getting killed throughout the story. Making matters worse, the relationship between Antony and Octavian starts to show strains, hinting at [[Theatre/AntonyandCleopatra [[Theatre/AntonyAndCleopatra even more instability to follow]].


%% * PropheciesAreAlwaysRight: Beware the Ides of March!
* PsychicDreamsForEveryone: Caesar's wife has a prophetic dream on the night before the Ides of March. [[CassandraTruth He winds up ignoring it]].

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%% * PropheciesAreAlwaysRight: Beware Caesar is told by a soothsayer, to his face, to beware the Ides of March!
March. His wife Calpurnia also dreams of his death the night before. Caesar goes out anyway, telling her that he can't hide at home.
* PsychicDreamsForEveryone: Caesar's wife has a prophetic dream on the night before the Ides of March. his assassination. [[CassandraTruth He winds up ignoring it]].doesn't exactly ignore it, but he doesn't heed her wishes and stay home]].



%% * ReversePsychology: Antony's speech to the crowd.

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%% * ReversePsychology: Antony's speech to the crowd.crowd. Since he has promised not to praise Caesar or speak out directly against the conspirators, he spends the whole speech saying that he simply ''can't'' tell the audience what a good person Caesar was, because they'd turn on Brutus... who is such [[SarcasmMode an honourable man]]. Needless to say, they turn on the conspirators in short order.



* SarcasmMode: Antony's speech is a dramatic example: He begins with a seemingly-sincerely claim that Brutus and the conspirators are honourable men who acted for good reasons. The longer the speech goes, the repeated phrase "and Brutus is an honourable man" becomes ironic, then insulting, and finally utterly ''venomous''.

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* SarcasmMode: Antony's speech is a dramatic example: He begins with a seemingly-sincerely seemingly-sincere claim that Brutus and the conspirators are honourable men who acted for good reasons. The longer But as he continues, he makes Caesar look better and better in the speech goes, crowd's eyes, while the repeated phrase "and Brutus is an honourable man" becomes ironic, then insulting, and finally utterly ''venomous''.


* AgeLift: In the "[[WesternAnimation/ShakespeareTheAnimatedTales" episode Cassius is a grey haired individual and looks more like he could be of Caesar's generation than of Brutus', which he historically was.

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* AgeLift: In the "[[WesternAnimation/ShakespeareTheAnimatedTales" "WesternAnimation/ShakespeareTheAnimatedTales" episode Cassius is a grey haired individual and looks more like he could be of Caesar's generation than of Brutus', which he historically was.


* AgeLift: In the "Shakespeare: the Animated Tales" episode Cassius is a grey haired individual and looks more like he could be of Caesar's generation than of Brutus', which he historically was.

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* AgeLift: In the "Shakespeare: the Animated Tales" "[[WesternAnimation/ShakespeareTheAnimatedTales" episode Cassius is a grey haired individual and looks more like he could be of Caesar's generation than of Brutus', which he historically was.

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