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* ButtDialingMordor: Though Faustus himself knows what he's getting into when he starts summoning demons, Robin and Dick do not. They're larking around, misreading the Latin as if on purpose, and accidentally summon Mephistopheles himself. He isn't happy at all by their disrespectful methods and [[BalefulPolymorph transforms them into animals]]. This trope suggests that there never was anything special to Faustus's original incantations and that he never actually knew what he was doing.
** As a matter of fact, Mephistophilis implies that Faustus' "magic" mainly "worked" by virtue of being extremely disrespectful to the name of Jehovah. One interpretation is that when the demons heard such blasphemy, they homed in on it looking for easy prey.

to:

* ButtDialingMordor: Though Faustus himself knows what he's getting into when he starts summoning demons, Robin and Dick do not. They're larking around, misreading the Latin as if on purpose, and accidentally summon Mephistopheles himself. He isn't happy at all by their disrespectful methods and [[BalefulPolymorph transforms them into animals]]. This trope suggests that there never was anything special to Faustus's original incantations and that he never actually knew what he was doing.
**
doing. As a matter of fact, Mephistophilis implies that Faustus' "magic" mainly "worked" by virtue of being extremely disrespectful to the name of Jehovah. One interpretation is that when the demons heard such blasphemy, they homed in on it looking for easy prey.


* AltumVidetur: Enforced. This is a play set in Medieval European academia, after all. Academics used Latin because the Church did (the universities, after all, were established to train clergy) and because it meant their scholarship could be understood across Europe. It also has the fringe benefit of making inane debates seem lofty. It becomes a character trait for Faustus, because he uses it to dignify his faulty arguments. This is especially apparent in his opening monologue, where he convinces himself that he's too smart for every academic field with liberal use of out-of-context phrases from the Latin classics.



* GratuitousLatin: Enforced. This is a play set in Medieval European academia, after all. Academics used Latin because the Church did (the universities, after all, were established to train clergy) and because it meant their scholarship could be understood across Europe. It also has the fringe benefit of making inane debates seem lofty. It becomes a character trait for Faustus, because he uses it to dignify his faulty arguments. This is especially apparent in his opening monologue, where he convinces himself that he's too smart for every academic field with liberal use of out-of-context phrases from the Latin classics.



* TechnoBabble: Believe it or not, this comes up in an early conversation between Faustus and Mephistophilis. Faustus quizzes the demon on why the planets move the way they do. Since Mephistophilis' job is to win souls for Hell, not to answer obscure scientific questions, he cops out with the Latin phrase "per inoequalem motum respect totes," which means "by unequal motion relative to the whole." This sounds like real astronomy, especially because of the old AltumVidetur thing, but it's so vague and general as to be this trope. It's so vague, it's not even false per se. It's as if you asked how a car worked and somebody told you "by virtue of lubricated mechanical linkages actuated by kinetic energy."

to:

* TechnoBabble: Believe it or not, this comes up in an early conversation between Faustus and Mephistophilis. Faustus quizzes the demon on why the planets move the way they do. Since Mephistophilis' job is to win souls for Hell, not to answer obscure scientific questions, he cops out with the Latin phrase "per inoequalem motum respect totes," which means "by unequal motion relative to the whole." This sounds like real astronomy, especially because of the old AltumVidetur GratuitousLatin thing, but it's so vague and general as to be this trope. It's so vague, it's not even false per se. It's as if you asked how a car worked and somebody told you "by virtue of lubricated mechanical linkages actuated by kinetic energy."

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* UnexpectedlyRealMagic: Inverted when John Faustus recites a conjuring spell he is given, so when the messenger to the Devil appears, Faustus thinks that it has somehow worked. The demon tells him that it didn't work, but he was listening anyway and decided to find out what Faustus was doing, especially because Faustus was blaspheming and the demon really likes that.


''The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus'' is 16th-century English playwright Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's take on the classic legend of {{Faust}}, or, as he calls him, Dr. John Faustus. Marlowe, who in his own time was considered something of a rebel and an atheist (which is to say, someone who did not practise the faith exactly as the law said it should be practised; the word could apply to someone who was simply sceptical of the scripture as it was given, someone who blasphemed, or even a Catholic), represents Faustus as a typically Renaissance figure, seeking above all things knowledge -- and the expansion of personal wealth and power that knowledge brings. His play is the first version of the story to present the central figure as a character who is somehow magnificent even in the midst of his crimes, exactly because his desires have no limits.

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''The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus'' is 16th-century English playwright Creator/ChristopherMarlowe's take on the classic legend of {{Faust}}, Myth/{{Faust}}, or, as he calls him, Dr. John Faustus. Marlowe, who in his own time was considered something of a rebel and an atheist (which is to say, someone who did not practise the faith exactly as the law said it should be practised; the word could apply to someone who was simply sceptical of the scripture as it was given, someone who blasphemed, or even a Catholic), represents Faustus as a typically Renaissance figure, seeking above all things knowledge -- and the expansion of personal wealth and power that knowledge brings. His play is the first version of the story to present the central figure as a character who is somehow magnificent even in the midst of his crimes, exactly because his desires have no limits.



This play is the TropeNamer for LauncherOfAThousandShips. See also {{Faust}} for further information, including versions of the story by other authors.

to:

This play is the TropeNamer for LauncherOfAThousandShips. See also {{Faust}} Myth/{{Faust}} for further information, including versions of the story by other authors.


* AltumVidetur: Enforced. This is a play set in Medieval European academia, after all. Academics used Latin to make inane debates seem lofty. It becomes a character trait for Faustus, because he uses it to dignify his faulty arguments. This is especially apparent in his opening monologue, where he convinces himself that he's too smart for every academic field with liberal use of out-of-context phrases from the Latin classics.

to:

* AltumVidetur: Enforced. This is a play set in Medieval European academia, after all. Academics used Latin because the Church did (the universities, after all, were established to make train clergy) and because it meant their scholarship could be understood across Europe. It also has the fringe benefit of making inane debates seem lofty. It becomes a character trait for Faustus, because he uses it to dignify his faulty arguments. This is especially apparent in his opening monologue, where he convinces himself that he's too smart for every academic field with liberal use of out-of-context phrases from the Latin classics.


* HisOwnWorstEnemy: Ultimately, Mephistopheles does not deceive Faustus at all. Faust makes a DealWithADevil that's explicitly horrible for him in the long run, squanders the power he does get, and is dragged to hell purely because he's so impulsive and shortsighted.

to:

* HisOwnWorstEnemy: Ultimately, Mephistopheles does not deceive Faustus at all. Faust makes a DealWithADevil DealWithTheDevil that's explicitly horrible for him in the long run, squanders the power he does get, and is dragged to hell purely because he's so impulsive and shortsighted.


* MisappliedPhlebotinum: Faustus uses Mephisto's phenomenal cosmic powers to pull pranks and get women.


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* WithGreatPowerComesGreatPerks: Faustus uses Mephisto's phenomenal cosmic powers to pull pranks and get women.


* IdiotBall: After being humiliated by Faustus, the knight Benvolio gets a group of knights together to get revenge. Against the scholar with a demon slave and all the powers of Hell. It goes about as well as you'd expect. Faustus more than qualifies as well (see Badass Normal, Informed Ability, and Misapplied Phlebotinum).

to:

* IdiotBall: After being humiliated by Faustus, the knight Benvolio gets a group of knights together to get revenge. Against the scholar with a demon slave and all the powers of Hell. It goes about as well as you'd expect. Faustus more than qualifies as well (see Badass Normal, Informed Ability, and Misapplied Phlebotinum).



* HisOwnWorstEnemy: Ultimately, Mephistopheles does not deceive Faustus at all. Faust makes a DealWithADevil that's explicitly horrible for him in the long run, squanders the power he does get, and is dragged to hell purely because he's so impulsive and shortsighted.



* SatanIsGood: Mephistopheles, ironically, seems to be one of the sanest and most honest characters in the entire play. Not to mention his "Why, this is hell, nor am I out of it" speech.



* SympathyForTheDevil: Mephistopheles, ironically, seems to be one of the sanest and most honest characters in the entire play. Not to mention his "Why, this is hell, nor am I out of it" speech.


* AltumVidetur: Faustus frequently quotes Latin phrases and [[AsTheGoodBookSays Bible quotes]] either poorly or completely out of context, implying he isn't as wise as he thinks he is.

to:

* AltumVidetur: Faustus frequently quotes Enforced. This is a play set in Medieval European academia, after all. Academics used Latin to make inane debates seem lofty. It becomes a character trait for Faustus, because he uses it to dignify his faulty arguments. This is especially apparent in his opening monologue, where he convinces himself that he's too smart for every academic field with liberal use of out-of-context phrases and [[AsTheGoodBookSays Bible quotes]] either poorly or completely out of context, implying he isn't as wise as he thinks he is.from the Latin classics.


Added DiffLines:

** As a matter of fact, Mephistophilis implies that Faustus' "magic" mainly "worked" by virtue of being extremely disrespectful to the name of Jehovah. One interpretation is that when the demons heard such blasphemy, they homed in on it looking for easy prey.

Added DiffLines:

* TechnoBabble: Believe it or not, this comes up in an early conversation between Faustus and Mephistophilis. Faustus quizzes the demon on why the planets move the way they do. Since Mephistophilis' job is to win souls for Hell, not to answer obscure scientific questions, he cops out with the Latin phrase "per inoequalem motum respect totes," which means "by unequal motion relative to the whole." This sounds like real astronomy, especially because of the old AltumVidetur thing, but it's so vague and general as to be this trope. It's so vague, it's not even false per se. It's as if you asked how a car worked and somebody told you "by virtue of lubricated mechanical linkages actuated by kinetic energy."


* ChronicVillainy: Faustus ''almost'' repents frequently throughout the play, but keeps convincing himself that he's too far gone, even when ''an angel'' tells him otherwise. Even as he's about to be sent to Hell for eternity, Faustus [[TooDumbToLive makes a speech begging to be given more time to live so he can repent, even though he could easily just repent then and there and save himself.]]

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* ChronicVillainy: Faustus ''almost'' almost repents frequently a few times throughout the play, story, but keeps convincing himself Mephistopheles and Lucifer threaten him enough that he's too far gone, even when ''an angel'' scared to actually repent. Even though the Good Angel tells him otherwise. Even as he's about otherwise, he refuses to be sent admit to Hell for eternity, Faustus [[TooDumbToLive makes a speech begging to be given more time to live so himself that he can repent, even though repent. Even at the end of the play, he could easily just repent then and there and [[BreakTheHaughty cannot get himself]] to save himself.]]himself, cravenly asking for more time.



* DespairEventHorizon: Faustus' biggest flaw is that he sees himself as beyond redemption, even when ''angels'' tell him he can make a FaustianRebellion.
* DownerEnding: Faustus refuses to see the error of his ways, then dies and goes to Hell for all eternity.
* EvilIsNotAToy: You made a DealWithTheDevil to have magic powers in exchange for taking your soul in a few short years... really, why act surprised? [[WhatAnIdiot What did you THINK was going to happen?]]

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* DespairEventHorizon: Faustus' biggest flaw is that After Lucifer introduces Faustus to the sins and threatens to torment him physically should he sees try to repent, the man loses all hope for redemption. He realizes the severity of his deal but cannot admit to himself as beyond redemption, even when ''angels'' tell him he can make a FaustianRebellion.
that the eternal ethereal peace profoundly outweighs the temporary physical torment.
* DownerEnding: Faustus refuses to see the error of his ways, then dies repent, desperately begs for more time, and goes is physically overpowered by a swarm of demons who literally drag him -- kicking and screaming -- to Hell for all eternity.
Hell.
* EvilIsNotAToy: You made a DealWithTheDevil to have magic powers in exchange One of the themes of the play. Namely, man cannot control evil, so don't make deals with Lucifer. He'll get what he wants for taking your soul in a few short years... really, why act surprised? [[WhatAnIdiot What did eternity while you THINK was going to happen?]]only get what you want temporarily.



* FlamingDevil: Mephistopheles' interaction with Faust contains a fair amount of implied homosexuality on the former's part (such as Mephisto stating that Heaven "is not so fair as [Faustus] or any man that breathes on earth"). Stage productions sometimes turn the subtext into text.



* HomoeroticSubtext: A fair portion of Mephistopheles' dialogue with Faustus implies homosexuality on the demon's part. It is ambiguous as to whether he feels this way to all humans or to men specifically when he says things like Heaven "is not so fair as [Faustus] or any man that breathes on earth." Stage productions will sometimes make the subtext more explicit.



%%* KidWithTheLeash: Even though he's an adult.
%%* MagicIsEvil
* MeaningfulName: The demon Faust summons is originally called "Mephostophiles", which is Greek for "Not A Lover of Light". Goethe would later change the name to Mephistophiles, as Mephis is a medical term for extremely bad breath, and "tophiles" sounds like "Teufel", the German word for devil, ultimately making his name [[PunnyName Smelly-Breathed Devil]].

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%%* KidWithTheLeash: Even though he's an adult.
%%* MagicIsEvil
* MagicIsEvil:
** Magic in this story comes in the form of angels exerting their energy on the physical world. It just so happens that all of the "angels" are actually ''fallen'' angels, or ''demons.'' Thus, all magic is depicted as evil.
** Two scholars discuss Faustus early in the play, and they realize that he has made a deal with Lucifer. They talk about the two magicians that introduced Faustus to magic, which they consider to be inherently evil.
* MeaningfulName: The demon Faust summons is originally called "Mephostophiles", which is Greek for "Not A Lover of Light". Goethe would later change This is one of several implications as to Mephistopheles' true opinion on Lucifer, who is the name to Mephistophiles, as Mephis is a medical term for extremely bad breath, and "tophiles" sounds like "Teufel", the German word for devil, ultimately making his name [[PunnyName Smelly-Breathed Devil]]."Bringer of Light."



* ThirdPersonPerson: Faustus.

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* ThirdPersonPerson: Faustus.Faustus, especially at the beginning of the play, speaks to himself and uses his name in place of the first-person personal pronoun. This emphasizes his vanity and haughtiness, and it is one of many hints at Faustus's actual intelligence.



* TooCleverByHalf: Faustus' brilliance ends up working against him as he essentially tricks himself into accepting Mephistopheles' deal

to:

* TooCleverByHalf: Faustus' brilliance ends up working against him as he essentially tricks Mephistopheles manipulates Faustus into convincing himself into accepting Mephistopheles' dealto take the deal. In particular, Mephistopheles reasons that if he is a demon and if he exists, then God and Hell must also exist, due to what a demon ''is''. Faustus, however, argues that just because one part of a story is true does not make other parts true. It's a fallacious argument because the "other parts" (the existence of God and Hell) are ''necessary'' for the first part to be true (the existence of demons, a.k.a. fallen angels).


* AFormYouAreComfortableWith: Faustus cannot stand Mephistopheles' initial appearance (which isn't specified beyond calling it "too ugly"), ordering him to vanish and reappear in the form of a Franciscan monk.
* AltumVidetur: Faustus frequently quotes Latin phrases and [[AsTheGoodBookSays Bible quotes]] either poorly or completely out of context.

to:

* AFormYouAreComfortableWith: This is {{enforced|Trope}}. Faustus cannot stand Mephistopheles' initial appearance (which isn't specified beyond calling it "too ugly"), ordering appearance, being a profoundly repulsive image, so he orders him to vanish and reappear in the form of as a Franciscan monk.
* AltumVidetur: Faustus frequently quotes Latin phrases and [[AsTheGoodBookSays Bible quotes]] either poorly or completely out of context.context, implying he isn't as wise as he thinks he is.



%%* BlackMagic
%%* BreakTheHaughty

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%%* BlackMagic
%%* BreakTheHaughty
* BreakTheHaughty: Faustus begins the story by rejecting various scholarly studies, believing he has mastered every one of them. He rejects theology as well, completely misunderstanding the concept of sin leading to death. By the end of the story, Faustus has gone through various kinds of abuse from Mephistopheles, the Devil, and other demons. He's completely distraught, refusing to repent because he's too emotionally broken to realize his options.



* CanisLatinicus: Robin says gibberish that only sounds like it's Latin. However, because of everything he's doing and the context in which he's doing it, he ends up successfully summoning Mephistopheles. This is one of many clues that Faustus isn't so special after all.



* DealWithTheDevil: The TropeCodifier; Faustus sells his soul to Lucifer in exchange for having Mephistopheles at his command.

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* DealWithTheDevil: The TropeCodifier; Faustus sells his soul to Lucifer in exchange for temporarily having Mephistopheles at his command.



* EvilIsPetty: Faustus gains great demonic power and immediately.... punches the Pope. This is the point, Faustus gains great power at a horrific cost and squanders it all away, showing that the problem is not the lack of knowledge or ability but the man wielding it.

to:

* EvilIsPetty: EvilIsPetty:
**
Faustus gains great demonic power and immediately.... immediately punches the Pope. This Pope.
** Mephistopheles
is the point, Faustus gains great power at a horrific cost summoned on accident by Robin and squanders it all away, showing that the problem is not the lack of knowledge or ability but the man wielding it.Dick and so he decides to transform them into animals.



** Mephistopheles displays a surprising amount of '''[[NobleDemon Honor]]'''. He keeps his bargain to the letter, giving Faustus everything that he promises, without even invoking ExactWords. He even tries to talk Faustus out of the deal, pointing out that if he, a demon, exists, then it's likely that God and Hell also exist and thus Faustus would be making a horrible mistake to take Faustus up on the offer, though he concedes when Faustus points out that one part of a story being true does not prove any other parts true.
** Mephistopheles also has a great deal of '''Loyalty'''. He obeys Lucifer's call consistently and without hesitation, and holds no resentment despite being well aware that Lucifer is responsible for his inability to partake in the infinite joys of Heaven. He doesn't even have any selfish reasons for helping Lucifer-he simply has no desire to defy his master.

to:

** Mephistopheles displays a surprising amount of '''[[NobleDemon Honor]]'''. He keeps his bargain to the letter, giving Faustus everything that he promises, without even invoking abusing possible loopholes based on ExactWords. He even tries to talk Faustus out of the deal, pointing out that if he, a demon, exists, then it's likely that God and Hell also exist and thus Faustus would be making a horrible mistake to take Faustus up on the offer, though he concedes when Faustus points out that one part of a story being true does not prove any other parts true.
** Mephistopheles also has a great deal of '''Loyalty'''. He obeys Lucifer's call consistently and without hesitation, and holds no resentment despite being well aware that Lucifer is responsible for his inability to partake in the infinite joys of Heaven. He doesn't even have any selfish reasons for helping Lucifer-he simply has no desire to defy his master.


* ButtDialingMordor: Though Faustus himself knows exactly what he's getting into when he starts summoning demons, ThoseTwoGuys that serve him don't. They're larking around, mimicking Faustus's incantations more as a joke than anything else, and end up summoning Mephistopheles himself. Needless to say, he's not happy at all and they get [[BalefulPolymorph transfigured into animals]].

to:

* ButtDialingMordor: Though Faustus himself knows exactly what he's getting into when he starts summoning demons, ThoseTwoGuys that serve him don't. Robin and Dick do not. They're larking around, mimicking Faustus's incantations more misreading the Latin as a joke than anything else, if on purpose, and end up summoning accidentally summon Mephistopheles himself. Needless to say, he's not He isn't happy at all by their disrespectful methods and they get [[BalefulPolymorph transfigured transforms them into animals]].animals]]. This trope suggests that there never was anything special to Faustus's original incantations and that he never actually knew what he was doing.



* ThoseTwoGuys: Faustus' students, who provide much of the plays comic relief by using their teacher's magic to [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatPerks dick around]].

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* ThoseTwoGuys: Faustus' students, Robin and Dick, who provide much of the plays comic relief by using their teacher's Faustus's magic to [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatPerks dick around]].


* DespairEventHorizon: Faustus' biggest flaw is that he sees himself as beyond redemption, even when ''angels'' tell him he can make a FaustianRebellion.



* MundaneUtility: Sure, Faustus has the powers of hell at his disposal, but most of the time he uses it to... make fun of the pope? Get fresh grapes in winter for his lady friend?
%%* NobleDemon: You could make an argument for Mephistopheles.

to:

* MundaneUtility: Sure, Faustus has the powers of hell at his disposal, but most of the time he uses it to... make fun of the pope? Get fresh grapes in winter for his lady friend?
%%*
friend? Have sex with Helen of Troy? Faustus eventually realises that he wasted his infinite knowledge for the pettiest of reasons, instead of using said knowledge as he promised before he made that stupid pact, like changing the world for the better. Alas, it is too late, and marks the point where he crosses the DespairEventHorizon.
*
NobleDemon: You could Mephistopheles adheres to VillainsNeverLie and does exactly what Faustus tells him so, to make an argument for Mephistopheles.the point that it is Faustus himself who ruined his own life.


This play is, of course, the TropeNamer for LauncherOfAThousandShips. See also {{Faust}} for further information, including versions of the story by other authors.

to:

This play is, of course, is the TropeNamer for LauncherOfAThousandShips. See also {{Faust}} for further information, including versions of the story by other authors.

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