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The musical is generally faithful to the book's plot, though it does omit some key subplots and elements like Anne's falling out with Mrs. Barry, Anne falling off the ridge poll, and Anne being rescued from the river by Gilbert. However, the show takes full advantage of the fact that it is a musical, turns nearly all the remaining elements UpToEleven and establishes its own quirky identity with its offbeat sense of humour and classic Broadway sound. It enthusiastically lampoons the cultural attitudes of its period setting, and functions as a sort of AffectionateParody of the source material.

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The musical is generally faithful to the book's plot, though it does omit some key subplots and elements like Anne's falling out with Mrs. Barry, Anne falling off the ridge poll, ridgepole, and Anne being rescued from the river by Gilbert. However, the show takes full advantage of the fact that it is a musical, turns nearly all the remaining elements UpToEleven and establishes its own quirky identity with its offbeat sense of humour and classic Broadway sound. It enthusiastically lampoons the cultural attitudes of its period setting, and functions as a sort of AffectionateParody of the source material.

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* NobleSavage: The pageant's portrayal of the "Proud Red Indian", due to (possibly intentional) ValuesDissonance.

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* AnachronismStew: The pageant is a probably intentional example. It depicts "Eskimos" living in Canada during the ice age, followed by the "Red Indian" and seems to imply that Vikings were contemporary with French and British explorers.


* NightmareFuelStationAttendant: Anne has shades of this, as established early on with her shockingly gory explanation for my Prince Edward Island's roads are red.

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* NightmareFuelStationAttendant: Anne has shades of this, as established early on with her shockingly gory explanation for my why Prince Edward Island's roads are red.


* AbusiveParents: Mrs. Blewett, who makes her kids stay in the woodshed until feeding time.

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* AbusiveParents: Mrs. Blewett, who makes locks her kids stay up in the woodshed until feeding time.


* AbusiveParents: Mrs. Bluett, who makes her kids stay in the woodshed until feeding time.
* BlackComedy: The musical makes great use of this (see DarkerAndEdgier and DeliberateValuesDissonance below), most notably Mr. Phillips brief innuendo-laden solo during "If It Hadn't Been For Me" about "[[UnusualEuphemism attending to the needs]]" of his female students.

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* AbusiveParents: Mrs. Bluett, Blewett, who makes her kids stay in the woodshed until feeding time.
* BlackComedy: The musical makes great use of this at times (see DarkerAndEdgier and DeliberateValuesDissonance below), most notably Mr. Phillips Phillips' brief innuendo-laden solo during "If It Hadn't Been For Me" about "[[UnusualEuphemism attending to the needs]]" of his female students.



* DarkerAndEdgier: While still very lighthearted, the musical definitely has a darker edge to it than the book and previous adaptations.
* DeliberateValuesDissonance: The show does not shy away from portraying and satirizing the cultural norms of the setting, including the racist and colonial attitudes, and the often creepy relationships between male teachers and female students.
* GratuitousLatin: While lamenting the passing of Summer and the return of school, the children sing the phrase "Sic semper gloria mundi" which translates to "Thus passes the glory of the world".
* KarmaHoudini: Mr. Phillips is the closest thing the show has to a villain (secondary antagonists like Josie considered), but gets no comeuppance aside from being forced to marry the teenage girl he impregnated.

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* DarkerAndEdgier: While still very lighthearted, the musical definitely has a darker edge to it its humour than the book and previous adaptations.
* DeliberateValuesDissonance: The show does not shy away from portraying and satirizing the cultural norms of the setting, including the racist racist, xenophobic and colonial attitudes, and the often creepy relationships between male teachers and female students.
* GratuitousLatin: While lamenting the passing of Summer and the return of school, the children sing the phrase "Sic semper transit gloria mundi" which translates to "Thus passes the glory of the world".
* KarmaHoudini: Mr. Phillips is easily the closest thing nastiest person in the show has to a villain (secondary antagonists like Josie considered), show, but gets no comeuppance aside from being forced to marry the teenage girl he impregnated.



* UpToEleven: A meta example. As stated above, the musical is ''Anne of Green Gables'' taken up to eleven. Gilbert is thought to be "good as dead" after his first encounter with Anne's fiery temper, Mr. Phillips and Prissy's relationship is upgraded from a presumably chaste affair to something much more illicit, the children perform a full-blown rehearsed musical number at the concert, and many of the locals harbor some shockingly racist colonial sentiments.

to:

* UpToEleven: A meta example. As stated above, the musical is ''Anne of Green Gables'' taken up to eleven. Gilbert is thought to be "good as dead" after his first encounter with Anne's fiery temper, Mr. Phillips and Prissy's relationship is upgraded from a presumably chaste affair to something much more illicit, the children perform a full-blown rehearsed musical number at the concert, and many of the locals harbor some shockingly racist colonial sentiments.attitudes.
* VillainSong: Josie Pye is not exactly a villain, but she is Anne's main rival and her song "Did You Hear" definitely has the flavour of a villain song.

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* AbusiveParents: Mrs. Bluett, who makes her kids stay in the woodshed until feeding time.


!!This musical provide examples of:

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!!This musical provide provides examples of:



* GratuitousLatin: While lamenting the passing of Summer and the return of Summer, the children sing the phrase "Sic semper gloria mundi" which translates to "Thus passes the glory of the world".

to:

* GratuitousLatin: While lamenting the passing of Summer and the return of Summer, school, the children sing the phrase "Sic semper gloria mundi" which translates to "Thus passes the glory of the world".

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* PoliticallyCorrectHistory: Enthusiastically averted.

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* KarmaHoudini: Mr. Phillips is the closest thing the show has to a villain (secondary antagonists like Josie considered), but gets no comeuppance aside from being forced to marry the teenage girl he impregnated.


The musical is generally faithful to the book's plot, though it does omit some key subplots and elements like Anne's falling out with Mrs. Barry, Anne falling off the ridge poll, and Anne being rescued from the river by Gilbert. However, the show takes full advantage of the fact that it is a musical, turns nearly all the remaining elements UpToEleven and establishes its own quirky identity with its offbeat sense of humour and classic Broadway sound. It enthusiastically lampoons the cultural attitudes of its period setting, and functions as a sort of AffectionateParody.

to:

The musical is generally faithful to the book's plot, though it does omit some key subplots and elements like Anne's falling out with Mrs. Barry, Anne falling off the ridge poll, and Anne being rescued from the river by Gilbert. However, the show takes full advantage of the fact that it is a musical, turns nearly all the remaining elements UpToEleven and establishes its own quirky identity with its offbeat sense of humour and classic Broadway sound. It enthusiastically lampoons the cultural attitudes of its period setting, and functions as a sort of AffectionateParody.
AffectionateParody of the source material.



* DeliberateValuesDissonance: The show does not shy away from satirizing the racist and colonial attitudes of the setting, and the often creepy relationships between male teachers and female students.

to:

* DeliberateValuesDissonance: The show does not shy away from portraying and satirizing the cultural norms of the setting, including the racist and colonial attitudes of the setting, attitudes, and the often creepy relationships between male teachers and female students.


* DeliberateValuesDissonance: The show does not shy away from satirizing the racist and colonial attitudes of the setting, and it is strongly implied that Mr. Phillips impregnates Prissy Andrews.

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* DeliberateValuesDissonance: The show does not shy away from satirizing the racist and colonial attitudes of the setting, and it is strongly implied that Mr. Phillips impregnates Prissy Andrews.the often creepy relationships between male teachers and female students.



* TeenPregnancy: The implied result of the above TeacherStudentRomance.
* UpToEleven: A meta example. As stated above, the musical is ''Anne of Green Gables'' taken up to eleven. Gilbert is thought to be "good as dead" after his first encounter with Anne's fiery temper, Mr. Phillips and Prissy's relationship is upgraded from a presumably chaste affair to something much more illicit, the children perform a full-blown rehearsed musical number at the concert, and many of the locals harbour some shockingly racist colonial sentiments.

to:

* TeenPregnancy: The implied result of the above TeacherStudentRomance.
* UpToEleven: A meta example. As stated above, the musical is ''Anne of Green Gables'' taken up to eleven. Gilbert is thought to be "good as dead" after his first encounter with Anne's fiery temper, Mr. Phillips and Prissy's relationship is upgraded from a presumably chaste affair to something much more illicit, the children perform a full-blown rehearsed musical number at the concert, and many of the locals harbour harbor some shockingly racist colonial sentiments.


* DarkerAndEdgier: While still very lighthearted, the musical definitely has a darker edge to its humour than the book and previous adaptations.

to:

* DarkerAndEdgier: While still very lighthearted, the musical definitely has a darker edge to its humour it than the book and previous adaptations.



* HotForStudent: The script heavily implies a sexual relationship between schoolteacher Mr. Phillips and Prissy Andrews, resulting in a pregnancy and subsequent hasty marriage.



* TeenPregnancy: Poor Prissy.

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* TeacherStudentRomance: Mr. Phillips and Prissy, obviously.
* TeenPregnancy: Poor Prissy.The implied result of the above TeacherStudentRomance.


The musical is generally faithful to the book's plot, though it does omit some key subplots and elements like Anne's falling out with Mrs. Barry, Anne falling off the ridge poll, and Anne being rescued from the river by Gilbert. However, the show takes full advantage of the fact that it is a musical, turns nearly all the remaining elements UpToEleven and establishes its own quirky identity with its offbeat sense of humour and classic Broadway sound. It enthusiastically lampoons the cultural attitudes of its period setting, and functions as a sort of affectionate parody.

to:

The musical is generally faithful to the book's plot, though it does omit some key subplots and elements like Anne's falling out with Mrs. Barry, Anne falling off the ridge poll, and Anne being rescued from the river by Gilbert. However, the show takes full advantage of the fact that it is a musical, turns nearly all the remaining elements UpToEleven and establishes its own quirky identity with its offbeat sense of humour and classic Broadway sound. It enthusiastically lampoons the cultural attitudes of its period setting, and functions as a sort of affectionate parody.
AffectionateParody.


* TeenPregnancy: Poor Prissy.

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* TeenPregnancy: Poor Prissy.Prissy.
* UpToEleven: A meta example. As stated above, the musical is ''Anne of Green Gables'' taken up to eleven. Gilbert is thought to be "good as dead" after his first encounter with Anne's fiery temper, Mr. Phillips and Prissy's relationship is upgraded from a presumably chaste affair to something much more illicit, the children perform a full-blown rehearsed musical number at the concert, and many of the locals harbour some shockingly racist colonial sentiments.

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