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* ThreeFacesOfEve: Lady Chiltern as the wife, Mrs. Cheveley as the seductress, and Mabel as the child.

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* ThreeFacesOfEve: TheThreeFacesOfEve: Lady Chiltern as the wife, Mrs. Cheveley as the seductress, and Mabel as the child.


* MenAreBetterThanWomen: ''An Ideal Husband'' states that, essentially, men are meant to go out into the world and do great things, while the most a woman can ask for is to help and support a great man.

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* MenAreBetterThanWomen: ''An Ideal Husband'' states that, essentially, [[MenActWomenAre men are meant to go out into the world and do great things, while the most a woman can ask for is to help and support a great man.man]].


[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/an_ideal_husband_play.png]]



* TheVamp: Mrs. Cheveley.

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* TheVamp: Mrs. Cheveley.Cheveley.
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** Given Goring's preoccupation with buttonholes, many productions go so far as to take the opportunity to give him Wilde's famous green carnation in at least one scene.


An Ideal Husband is an 1895 comedic stage play by Creator/OscarWilde which revolves around blackmail and political corruption, and touches on the themes of public and private honour. The action is set in London, in "the present", and takes place over the course of twenty-four hours. "Sooner or later," Wilde notes, "we shall all have to pay for what we do." But he adds that, "No one should be entirely judged by their past." Together with ''Theatre/TheImportanceOfBeingEarnest'', it is often considered Wilde's dramatic masterpiece. After ''Earnest'', it is his most popularly produced play.

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An ''An Ideal Husband Husband'' is an 1895 comedic stage play by Creator/OscarWilde which revolves around blackmail and political corruption, and touches on the themes of public and private honour. The action is set in London, in "the present", and takes place over the course of twenty-four hours. "Sooner or later," Wilde notes, "we shall all have to pay for what we do." But he adds that, "No one should be entirely judged by their past." Together with ''Theatre/TheImportanceOfBeingEarnest'', it is often considered Wilde's dramatic masterpiece. After ''Earnest'', it is his most popularly produced play.


An Ideal Husband is an 1895 comedic stage play by OscarWilde which revolves around blackmail and political corruption, and touches on the themes of public and private honour. The action is set in London, in "the present", and takes place over the course of twenty-four hours. "Sooner or later," Wilde notes, "we shall all have to pay for what we do." But he adds that, "No one should be entirely judged by their past." Together with ''Theatre/TheImportanceOfBeingEarnest'', it is often considered Wilde's dramatic masterpiece. After ''Earnest'', it is his most popularly produced play.

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An Ideal Husband is an 1895 comedic stage play by OscarWilde Creator/OscarWilde which revolves around blackmail and political corruption, and touches on the themes of public and private honour. The action is set in London, in "the present", and takes place over the course of twenty-four hours. "Sooner or later," Wilde notes, "we shall all have to pay for what we do." But he adds that, "No one should be entirely judged by their past." Together with ''Theatre/TheImportanceOfBeingEarnest'', it is often considered Wilde's dramatic masterpiece. After ''Earnest'', it is his most popularly produced play.


* PutOnABus: Mrs. Cheveley.

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* AuthorAvatar: Lord Goring, and as usual for Wilde's avatars he gets all the good lines.


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* HiddenDepths: Lord Goring.


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* MenAreBetterThanWomen: ''An Ideal Husband'' states that, essentially, men are meant to go out into the world and do great things, while the most a woman can ask for is to help and support a great man.


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* SmugSnake: Mrs. Cheveley.


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* TitleDrop: Lady Chiltern frequently uses the word "ideal" when speaking of her husband, but the only time the full phrase "an ideal husband" appears is right near the end, after Lord Goring and Mabel get engaged:
-->'''Caversham:''' And if you don't make this young lady an ideal husband, I'll cut you off with a shilling.\\
'''Mabel Chiltern:''' An ideal husband! Oh, I don't think I should like that.


* PutOnABus: Mrs. Cheveley.



* SingleWomanSeeksGoodMan: Lady Chiltern is ''exclusively'' attracted to Lord Chiltern for his stanch morality.

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* SingleWomanSeeksGoodMan: Lady Chiltern is ''exclusively'' attracted to Lord Chiltern for his stanch staunch morality.


Sir Robert Chiltern is a successful Government minister, well-off and with a loving wife. All this is threatened when Mrs. Cheveley appears in London with damning evidence of a past misdeed. Sir Robert turns for help to his friend Lord Goring, an apparently idle philanderer and the despair of his father. Goring knows the lady of old and plots to help his friend. Meanwhile Miss Mabel Chiltern, Sir Robert's lovely younger sister, has desires and ambitions of her own.


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Sir Robert Chiltern is a successful Government minister, well-off and with a loving wife. All this is threatened when Mrs. Cheveley appears in London with damning evidence of a past misdeed. Sir Robert turns for help to his friend Lord Goring, an apparently idle philanderer and the despair of his father. Goring knows the lady of old and plots to help his friend. Meanwhile Meanwhile, Miss Mabel Chiltern, Sir Robert's lovely younger sister, has desires and ambitions of her own.




* BlackmailBackfire: Unfortunately for Mrs. Cheveley, Lord Goring is has a bejeweled brooch belonging to his cousin that was stolen by Mrs. Cheveley. They agree to trade. Even her final, vengeful attempt to destroy the Chilterns' marriage goes awry when Sir Robert misinterprets a letter written by his wife to Lord Goring as a request for forgiveness. They reconcile, and by then Mrs. Cheveley is out of the picture.

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* BlackmailBackfire: Unfortunately for Mrs. Cheveley, Lord Goring is has a bejeweled brooch belonging to his cousin that was stolen by Mrs. Cheveley. They agree to trade. Even her final, vengeful attempt to destroy the Chilterns' marriage goes awry when Sir Robert misinterprets a letter written by his wife to Lord Goring as a request for his forgiveness. They reconcile, and by then Mrs. Cheveley is out of the picture.

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* CostumePorn: With so many highly fashionable characters, virtually every production gets this treatment.


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* GorgeousPeriodDress: Mrs. Cheveley, Mabel, and even Lady Chiltern get a few of these.


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* LadyInRed: Mrs. Cheveley is frequently one.


* AndNowYouMustMarryMe: Mrs. Cheveley's price for the incriminating letter is Lord Goring's hand in marriage.

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* AndNowYouMustMarryMe: Mrs. Cheveley's price for the incriminating letter letter, if not Sir Robert's support in her shady business venture, is Lord Goring's hand in marriage.

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* AndNowYouMustMarryMe: Mrs. Cheveley's price for the incriminating letter is Lord Goring's hand in marriage.


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* OldFlameFizzle: Mrs. Cheveley gets Lord Goring alone and seductively [[AndNowYouMustMarryMe suggests that she and Lord Goring get married]] in return for the incriminating letter. They had been previously engaged, and Lord Goring had been in love with her. This time around, Lord Goring is disgusted by the idea, particularly because he knows that she harbors no real feelings for him.


* NiceJobBreakingItHero: Sir Robert's behind-the-scenes corruption leads to his professional and financial success. With his political power, he works to make honest and fair judgements, and he's widely revered by all. Yet with all of his good work, his past comes back to haunt him, leading him down [[SadisticChoice a road of more secrets and immortality]].

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* BlackAndWhiteInsanity: Lady Chiltern strongly exemplifies this at the beginning of the play, believing her husband to be [[IncorruptiblePurePureness utterly incorruptible]] and in love with him for it. Naturally, she overcomes this by the end of the play.


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* IncorruptiblePurePureness: Deconstructed. The most honest and well-respected characters fall prey to follies; Sir Robert fed his ambition with corruption, Lady Chiltern abandoned her husband. Lady Chiltern initially believes her husband to have this, hence his being "ideal."


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* RedemptionEqualsAffliction: Sir Robert manages to win over his wife and atone for his past corruption, but at the cost of the career he worked so hard to build.

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