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* AffectionateParody: In-Universe example. Schikanderís company put on a parody of Don Giovani. Mozart attends this and clearly loves it while Schikander respects Mozart enough to commission the Magic Flute from him.

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* AffectionateParody: In-Universe example. Schikanderís Schikanederís company put puts on a parody of Don Giovani. ''Theatre/DonGiovanni''. Mozart attends this and clearly loves it while Schikander Schikaneder respects Mozart enough to commission the Magic Flute ''Theatre/TheMagicFlute'' from him.

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* AffectionateParody: In-Universe example. Schikanderís company put on a parody of Don Giovani. Mozart attends this and clearly loves it while Schikander respects Mozart enough to commission the Magic Flute from him.


%%* HardWorkHardlyWorks: Salieri.

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%%* HardWorkHardlyWorks: Salieri.* GoneHorriblyRight: The ultimate failing of Salieri's [[ASimplePlan plan to kill Mozart and profit from his death]] (see below); while his original intent was to steal the Requiem and have it played at Mozart's public funeral as a tribute to him, gaining acclaim for it, his plan to ruin Mozart succeeded so well that Mozart died a pauper and was given little more than a beggar's funeral which almost nobody attended, preventing Salieri from benefiting from the Requiem at all.



* HardWorkHardlyWorks: This is the basis of Salieri's resentment of Mozart; he's worked himself hard all his life to be a composer, but then Mozart shows up and not only outdoes him, but he makes it look ''easy.''



* TheShowMustGoOn: In the middle of a piano jingle solo at an opera performance, Mozart collapses. An understudy musician has to step in for the piano and the performaner, hearing Mozart fall, tries to look off-stage as he remains in character.



:: As he himself then admits, the plagiarism is the easy part. His real problem is, in his own words, "How does one kill a man?"
* TheShowMustGoOn: In the middle of a piano jingle solo at an opera performance, Mozart collapses. An understudy musician has to step in for the piano and the performaner, hearing Mozart fall, tries to look off-stage as he remains in character.

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:: ** As he himself then admits, the plagiarism is the easy part. His real problem is, in his own words, "How does one kill a man?"
* TheShowMustGoOn: In the middle of a piano jingle solo at an opera performance, Mozart collapses. An understudy musician has to step in for the piano and the performaner, hearing Mozart fall, tries to look off-stage as he remains in character.
man?"


** In reality, Salieri and Mozart had a great deal of respect for each other, attended each others' operas and Salieri ended up teaching one of Mozart's sons.[[note]]And some guy named [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]].[[/note]]

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** In reality, Salieri and Mozart had a great deal of respect for each other, attended each others' operas and Salieri ended up teaching one of Mozart's sons.[[note]]And some guy nobody named [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Beethoven]].[[/note]]


* AnnoyingLaugh: Mozart. Some have claimed that was actually how Mozart sounded when he laughed, with some contemporary accounts comparing it to "the braying of a jackass" mixed with breaking windows.

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* AnnoyingLaugh: Mozart. Some have claimed Mozart frequently delivers a shrill, obnoxious, hyena-like cackle. By all historical accounts that was [[TruthInTelevision actually how Mozart sounded when he laughed, laughed]], with some contemporary accounts contemporaries comparing it to "the braying of a jackass" mixed with breaking windows.windows, while others described it as "grating a cobblestone down a piano's string".


* BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler:At the end of the movie, Salieri rediscovers his own spirituality after realizing at the end of his confession that he wasn't Mozart's killer after all, and that he himself never knew that God was setting him up as something better, be it ever so slightly, than just a great composer doomed to live to see his fame and fortune wither away before his eyes: the patron saint of mediocrities.]]

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* BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler:At the end of the movie, Salieri rediscovers his own spirituality after realizing at the end of his confession that he wasn't Mozart's killer after all, and that he himself never knew that God was setting him up as something better, be it ever so slightly, than just a great composer doomed to live to see his fame and fortune wither away before his eyes: the patron saint of mediocrities. Of course, by this point he's living in an eighteenth century mental asylum and implicitly isn't all there, so this isn't exactly the triumph he seems to view it as.]]

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* MundaneMadeAwesome: Salieri believes Mozart's work to epitomise this trope, and his own to completely invert it. Lampshaded in a line from the play.
--> '''Salieri:''' We were both ordinary men, he and I. Yet he from the ordinary created legends Ė and I from legends created only the ordinary.


** One minor but curious alteration in the movie is the absence of Salieri's wife. The movie portrays him as celibate but secretly lustful towards his students, in particular Caterina Cavalieri, adding weight to the Director's Cut scene where he tries to take advantage of Constanze but doesn't entirely follow through. The real Salieri was most certainly not celibate, and was in fact known to have fathered eight children with his wife. In addition, the real Caterina Cavalieri was known to have been a mistress of Salieri.

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** One minor but curious alteration in the movie is the absence of Salieri's wife. The movie portrays him as celibate but secretly lustful towards his students, in particular Caterina Cavalieri, adding weight to the Director's Cut scene where he tries to take advantage of Constanze but doesn't entirely follow through. The real Salieri was most certainly not celibate, and was in fact known to have fathered eight children with his wife. In addition, the real Caterina Cavalieri was known to have been a mistress of Salieri. In the play, Salieri intentionally married a boring woman so he could simply be married and done with it without the temptation of spending too much time with her and strived for as much celibacy as possible. While he lusted for Caterina, he initially never touched her despite believing Mozart to have seduced her, until he broke his pact with God and seduced her himself entirely to spite God.



** The film paints Constanze's mother as a [[ObnoxiousInLaws vicious shrew who hates Mozart]], to the point where her constant shrieking is implied to be the inspiration for the Queen of the Night's shrill high notes. In reality, Mozart got along famously with her, along with the rest of his in-laws.

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** The film paints Constanze's mother as a [[ObnoxiousInLaws vicious shrew who hates Mozart]], to the point where her constant shrieking is implied to be the inspiration for the Queen of the Night's shrill high notes. In reality, Mozart got along famously with her, along with the rest of his in-laws.in-laws (in fact, the soprano who played the role of the Queen of the Night for the debut performance of ''The Magic Flute'' we see on-screen would historically have been Constanze's sister, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josepha_Weber Josepha Hofer]]).


* BrilliantButLazy: When really putting his mind to it, Mozart displays a passion for his compositions and operas. However, his real fault is his inability to go out and find a stable job (not helped by Salieri's constant sabotage).

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* BrilliantButLazy: When really putting his mind to it, Mozart displays a passion for his compositions and operas. However, his real fault is his inability inability/unwillingness to go out and find get a stable job (not helped teaching students (further compounded by his grating personality and Salieri's constant sabotage).sabotage).
** Inverted by Salieri, who is portrayed as a mediocre talent, but takes on private students in addition to his salaried post as court composer.

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** The scene in which Mozart dictates the Requiem to Salieri obviously never happened, but it is ''almost'' plausible: part of the reason that we still don't know exactly how much of the Requiem was written by Mozart is because there is only so much of the work that has been found written in his handwriting, but Constanze claimed that he had left sufficient notes and sketches of the remaining movements for an outside composer to complete Mozart's vision. The film posits that he "wrote" a great deal of it through dictation, thus explaining why the work is not in his hand. However, even if this were true, copies of the pieces which the film shows Mozart dictating to Salieri ("Confutatis", with the suggestion that they will finish the Lacrymosa before resting) exist in Mozart's hand.

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* {{Irony}}: The story is about how Mozart's music would eclipse Salieri's leaving him to be forgotten by history despite his best efforts. As mentioned above, it actually inspired a new wave of interest in Salieri and his works.


Ironically, the greatest legacy of ''Amadeus'' was a considerable revival of interest in the life and work of Antonio Salieri. Mozart in particular, and classical music in general, also got a nice little boost, but Mozart was quite well known already.

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Ironically, the greatest legacy of ''Amadeus'' was brought a considerable revival of interest in the life and work of Antonio Salieri. Mozart in particular, and classical music in general, also got a nice little boost, but Mozart was quite well known already.


* MeaningfulName: Mozart's middle name, "Amadeus," means "beloved of God." Salieri comes to believe that Mozart is God's favored instrument, which is why the story uses it as the title.

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* MeaningfulName: Mozart's middle name, "Amadeus," means "Amadeus" is often taken to mean "beloved by God", although its actual meaning is "love God!" (imperative). The fact that ''Amadeus'' is the title of God." the play/movie and that Salieri comes to believe believes that Mozart is God's favored instrument, which is why instrument suggests that the story uses it as author is playing on the title. interpretation as "beloved by God".

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* DownerEnding: For Mozart, [[spoiler: he dies from exhaustion thanks to Salieri just after his wife returned to reunite with him and is given a plague victim's funeral with his corpse being dumped in a mass grave.]]


Ironically, the greatest legacy of ''Amadeus'' was a considerable revival of interest in the life and work of Antonio Salieri.

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Ironically, the greatest legacy of ''Amadeus'' was a considerable revival of interest in the life and work of Antonio Salieri.
Salieri. Mozart in particular, and classical music in general, also got a nice little boost, but Mozart was quite well known already.

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