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*** That being said, while the location of his grave is known, the whereabouts of his remains are not. Per Austrian tradition of the time, his remains were exhumed some time around 10 years after his burial to make room for other burials, and otherwise disposed of. It is believed his skull was saved by a gravedigger, and turned over to historians at the beginning of the 20th century. While historians are confident it is indeed Mozart's skull, they admit they'll probably never know for certain.


%* AdaptationDistillation
* AffectionateParody: In-Universe example. Schikanederís company puts on a parody of ''Theatre/DonGiovanni''. Mozart attends this and clearly loves it while Schikaneder respects Mozart enough to commission ''Theatre/TheMagicFlute'' from him.

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%* AdaptationDistillation
* AdaptationDistillation: The movie is much better known than the previous works, expanding on both the comedy as well as relationships while downplaying some of the more over-the-top elements.
* AffectionateParody: In-Universe example. Schikanederís company puts on a parody of ''Theatre/DonGiovanni''. Mozart attends this and clearly loves it while Schikaneder respects Mozart enough to commission ''Theatre/TheMagicFlute'' from him. Indeed, it's mostly Mozart's wife who dislikes it. It should also be noted that Don Giovanni ''is'' a BlackComedy so they just did it LighterAndSofter.


* FourthWallObserver: In the stage play, Salieri (and only him) is aware of the audience, alternatively believing them to be his torment or his salvation, and addresses all of his monologues to them. (In the film version, the role of Salieri's confessor is given to a nameless priest, who actually exists in within the film as an actual person.)

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* FourthWallObserver: In the stage play, Salieri (and only him) is aware of the audience, alternatively believing them to be his torment or his salvation, and addresses all of his monologues to them. (In the film version, the role of Salieri's confessor is given to a nameless priest, who actually exists in within the film as an actual person.)


%%* AdaptationDistillation

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%%* %* AdaptationDistillation



* FourthWallObserver: In the stage play, Salieri (and only him) is aware of the audience, alternatively believing them to be his torment or his salvation, and addresses all of his monologues to them.

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* FourthWallObserver: In the stage play, Salieri (and only him) is aware of the audience, alternatively believing them to be his torment or his salvation, and addresses all of his monologues to them. (In the film version, the role of Salieri's confessor is given to a nameless priest, who actually exists in within the film as an actual person.)

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* MassiveMultiplayerEnsembleNumber: DiscussedTrope during the composition ''The Marriage of Figaro'', as Mozart believes the use of music to have multiple parties hold simultaneous conversations/trains of thought is what makes opera unique as a medium.

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* CrossingTheBurntBridge (in the director's cut only): Mozart, who has already mentioned that he would prefer to spend his time composing and that he is only giving music lessons to pay the bills, lets himself be hired by a wealthy Viennese burgher to give piano lessons to his daughter. The attempt ends in a fiasco, because the man refuses to leave the room while Mozart tries to teach his daughter (who is visibly embarrassed by her parents), insists on keeping his pack of dogs with him--who interrupt all music by yelping and howling--and generally behaves as obnoxious as possible, causing Mozart to rudely storm off with a sarcastic comment. Later, as Mozart's financial problems have worsened, he (obviously drunk and staggering) turns up at the burgher again and asks whether he can give music lessons to his daughter. As the daughter is married and away, Mozart further humiliates himself by asking whether he can borrow money, and receives a curt refusal.


The story and its relationship to actual history is often misunderstood. The story is about the supposed ''secret'' history of Salieri and Mozart, and works on the idea that recorded history is different because it has been ''duped''. In RealLife Salieri and Mozart were good friends and Salieri was a respected composer, but in this movie Salieri and Mozart are ''also'' good friends and Salieri ''is still'' a respected composer... as far as everybody else knows, Mozart included. The premise is that the only one who knows the ''real'' truth is Salieri, who is far too swallowed up in self-pity to appreciate his lot in life (which is, on the whole, pretty good) but is also enough of a VillainWithGoodPublicity that by the end he, and only he, really knows the extent of his bastardy (bar the priest he confesses to).

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The story and its relationship to actual history is often misunderstood. The story is about the supposed ''secret'' history of Salieri and Mozart, and works on the idea that recorded history is different because it has been ''duped''. In RealLife Salieri and Mozart were good friends and Salieri was a respected composer, but in this movie Salieri and Mozart are ''also'' good friends and Salieri ''is still'' a respected composer... as far as everybody else knows, Mozart included. The premise is that the only one who knows the ''real'' truth is Salieri, who is far too swallowed wallowed up in self-pity to appreciate his lot in life (which is, on the whole, pretty good) but is also enough of a VillainWithGoodPublicity that by the end he, and only he, really knows the extent of his bastardy (bar the priest he confesses to).


The story and its relationship to actual history is often misunderstood. The story is about the supposed ''secret'' history of Salieri and Mozart, and works on the idea that recorded history is different because it has been ''duped''. In RealLife Salieri and Mozart were good friends and Salieri was a respected composer, but in this movie Salieri and Mozart are ''also'' good friends and Salieri ''is still'' a respected composer... as far as everybody else knows, Mozart included. The premise is that the only one who knows the ''real'' truth is Salieri, who is far too wallowed up in self-pity to appreciate his lot in life (which is, on the whole, pretty good) but is also enough of a VillainWithGoodPublicity that by the end he, and only he, really knows the extent of his bastardy (bar the priest he confesses to).

to:

The story and its relationship to actual history is often misunderstood. The story is about the supposed ''secret'' history of Salieri and Mozart, and works on the idea that recorded history is different because it has been ''duped''. In RealLife Salieri and Mozart were good friends and Salieri was a respected composer, but in this movie Salieri and Mozart are ''also'' good friends and Salieri ''is still'' a respected composer... as far as everybody else knows, Mozart included. The premise is that the only one who knows the ''real'' truth is Salieri, who is far too wallowed swallowed up in self-pity to appreciate his lot in life (which is, on the whole, pretty good) but is also enough of a VillainWithGoodPublicity that by the end he, and only he, really knows the extent of his bastardy (bar the priest he confesses to).


* NotEvenBotheringWithTheAccent: Everyone in the cast spoke with their natural accents. British audiences found it jarring to dispense with a uniform [[TheQueensLatin Queen's Latin]].

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* NotEvenBotheringWithTheAccent: Everyone An interesting variation exists in the cast spoke with their film. Milos Forman wanted to immerse American audiences in 18th-century Vienna, so all the American accents represent what would have been spoken in German. Non-American accents, on the other hand, signify that the speaker is a foreigner. That's why Simon Callow (who has an English accent in real life) affected an American accent for his character, while Charles Kay (portraying an Italian in the film) kept his natural accents. English accent. It's also why the German operas get translated into English, but the Italian operas stay in Italian. As for F. Murray Abraham, he was (believe it or not) attempting a very slight Italian accent. Suffice it to say, British audiences found it jarring to dispense with a uniform [[TheQueensLatin Queen's Latin]].

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* EurekaMoment: When Salieri sees the cloaked figure in ''Don Giovanni'', you can practically the light bulb turn on over his head. He narrates that Mozart had resurrected his father to accuse him of being a bad son for all the world to see. The plans forms.

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-->'''Salieri:''' Your... ''merciful'' God.


* SympathyForTheHero: As much as Salieri resents Mozart for being [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter better than him,]] he is also one of the very few people able to recognize the true depths of Mozart's brilliance, and is never shy about praising it.

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* SympathyForTheHero: As much as Salieri resents Mozart for being [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter better than him,]] he is also one of the very few people able to recognize the true depths of Mozart's brilliance, and is never shy about praising it. For example, he makes sure ''Don Giovanni'' only has four performances -- and he attends all of them in secret. When asked about ''The Marriage of Figaro'', Salieri honestly tells Mozart it was magnificent.


* AppealToObscurity: To make his point to the priest, Salieri plays to him two of his compositions, of which he hasn't heard, in contrast to Mozart's "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik", that he immediately recognizes.

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* AppealToObscurity: To make his point to the priest, Salieri plays to him two of his compositions, of which he hasn't heard, in contrast to Mozart's "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik", that he immediately recognizes.recognizes even though Salieri only plays a few notes with one hand.


** The film depicts Emperor Joseph II as a hilariously bland UpperClassTwit, completely ignorant of music, who took his opinions from his courtiers, but in fact the reverse was true: Joseph was smart, very opinionated, had taken musical instruction from some very fine teachers, and persistently championed Mozart's music even when his own advisers tried to persuade him that he shouldn't.

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** The film depicts Emperor Joseph II as a hilariously bland UpperClassTwit, completely ignorant of music, who took his opinions from his courtiers, but in fact the reverse was true: Joseph was smart, very opinionated, had taken musical instruction from some very fine teachers, and persistently championed Mozart's music even when his own advisers tried to persuade him that he shouldn't. Though it is true that he once criticized Mozart's music for having "too many notes."

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