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[[caption-width-right:350: [[SarcasmMode Wow, jokes about Schwarzenegger movies in 2017!]] [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny So timeless, man!]]]]
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''The Simpsons'' is basically a living fossil trapped in time, the only pop culture connection left from the early 90s, as every other television show from the time has LONG ended. For perspective, the start of ''the Simpsons'' happened closer to the Eisenhower presidency (1953-1961) than to today. [[TheArtifact After almost 30 years, spanning four decades, various things glaringly show their age:]]

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''The Simpsons'' is basically a living fossil trapped in time, the only pop culture connection left from the early 90s, as every other television show from the time has LONG ended. For perspective, the start of ''the Simpsons'' happened closer to the Eisenhower presidency (1953-1961) than to today. [[TheArtifact After almost 30 years, spanning four decades, various things glaringly show their age:]]


* ''The Krusty the Clown Show'' was already somewhat of an anachronism when the show started, but it originally supposed to be somewhat of an {{Expy}} of ''Series/BozoTheClown'' from the 1960s (with a mix of other clowns the cast and crew grew up with, especially "Rusty Nails", a local TV clown in Portland, where Groening grew up), with fun stunts, tricks, sketches, and cartoons to entertain kids. This originally worked because very early Simpsons (the Tracey Ullman era and Seasons 1-2) took place in a mostly timeless but relatable era, and because the joke in later seasons was that a local children's television entertainer in a small dumpy town was such a celebrity. However, kids in the 90s and onward did not watch Bozo the Clown, or any TV clowns, as almost all of them disappeared into the 90s, and so did a large amount of local programming in general. As for cartoons, kids watched them on Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}, Creator/CartoonNetwork, Creator/DisneyChannel, UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, or just {{Saturday morning|cartoon}}s (with the latter two fading away by the end of TheNineties). So with Krusty the Clown already being a relic in the 90s, in modern Simpsons it is just an amorphous, low-budget VarietyShow with absolutely no set {{format|s}}, that is inexplicably a huge hit with Springfield's children, who would most likely have no desire to watch a run-down show when there are so many alternatives.

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* ''The Krusty the Clown Show'' was already somewhat of an anachronism when the show started, but it originally supposed to be somewhat of an {{Expy}} of ''Series/BozoTheClown'' from the 1960s (with a mix of other clowns the cast and crew grew up with, especially "Rusty Nails", a local TV clown in Portland, where Groening grew up), with fun stunts, tricks, sketches, and cartoons to entertain kids. This originally worked because very early Simpsons (the Tracey Ullman era and Seasons 1-2) took place in a mostly timeless but relatable era, and because the joke in later seasons was that a local children's television entertainer in a small dumpy town was such a celebrity. However, kids in the 90s and onward did not watch Bozo the Clown, or any TV clowns, as almost all of them disappeared into the 90s, and so did a large amount of local programming in general. As for cartoons, kids watched them on Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}, Creator/CartoonNetwork, Creator/DisneyChannel, UsefulNotes/{{syndication}}, or just {{Saturday morning|cartoon}}s morning|Cartoon}}s (with the latter two fading away by the end of TheNineties). So with Krusty the Clown already being a relic in the 90s, in modern Simpsons it is just an amorphous, low-budget VarietyShow with absolutely no set {{format|s}}, that is inexplicably a huge hit with Springfield's children, who would most likely have no desire to watch a run-down show when there are so many alternatives.


* However, during all of this, no characters created in the first two seasons were redesigned. Marge has blue hair when literally no one else does (although Patty and Selma also have strange colored hair). Homer has one line around his head signifying baldness, when every other bald character in the show has more realistic, full sides of the head (e.g. Superintendent Chalmers or Kirk Van Houten). Also, Homer's cylindrical head shape is not used with any other character since Season 2. Bart, Lisa, and Maggie are the only ones with hair color the same as their skin.

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* However, during all of this, no characters created in the first two seasons were redesigned. Marge has and the Van Houtens have blue hair when literally no one else does (although Patty and Selma also have strange colored hair). Homer has one line around his head signifying baldness, when every other bald character in the show has more realistic, full sides of the head (e.g. Superintendent Chalmers or Kirk Van Houten). Also, Homer's cylindrical head shape is not used with any other character since Season 2. Bart, Lisa, and Maggie are the only ones with hair color the same as their skin.


* The hatred that Homer has for Ned Flanders makes no sense anymore due to how dynamics have shifted. At the beginning of the show, Homer's resentment of Flanders was out of pure jealousy. Flanders had the family Homer wished he had: a beautiful and caring wife, well behaved and loving kids, enough money to live very comfortably, and beloved by the town. And while Homer could be miserable, Flanders was always cheerful -- the origin of Flanders's religiosity was simply that, while Homer struggled to even stay awake in church, Flanders actively looked forward to it. [[ThisLoserIsYou The Simpsons were the dumpy, everyman family constantly beaten down by the world]], [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter and the Flanderses were the successful, perfect neighbors.]] But as the show went on, the Simpsons became less beaten down and soon most episodes were about how awesome their lives were. Money never seems to be an issue anymore, and the Flanderses have completely changed. Maude was killed off, Ned turned from the perfect neighbor into a goofy but nosy, crazily religious moralizer, and Rod and Todd turned from naive and good-behaved to creepily sheltered. It makes absolutely no sense for Homer to be jealous of him.

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* The hatred that Homer has for Ned Flanders makes no sense anymore due to how dynamics have shifted. At the beginning of the show, Homer's resentment of Flanders was out of pure jealousy. Flanders had the family everything Homer wished he had: a beautiful and caring wife, well behaved and loving kids, enough money to live very comfortably, and beloved by the town. And while Homer could be miserable, Flanders was always cheerful -- the origin of Flanders's religiosity was simply that, while Homer struggled to even stay awake in church, Flanders actively looked forward to it. [[ThisLoserIsYou The Simpsons were the dumpy, everyman family constantly beaten down by the world]], [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter and the Flanderses were the successful, perfect neighbors.]] But as the show went on, the Simpsons became less beaten down and soon most episodes were about how awesome their lives were. Money never seems to be an issue anymore, and the Flanderses have completely changed. Maude was killed off, Ned turned from the perfect neighbor into a goofy but nosy, crazily religious moralizer, and Rod and Todd turned from naive and good-behaved to creepily sheltered. It makes absolutely no sense for Homer to be jealous of him.


* Otto Mann, the school bus driver, is clearly a Simpsonized take of 1980s metal-head teenagers (despite being a man in his 30s), with the long hair, the constant obsessions with 1970s and 1980s rock bands, his musical skills, the "surfer dude" voice, his slacker attitude and casual substance abuse, and his ever-present tape player with large headphones. Characters like this were commonly satirized in the late 80s and early 90s, with ''Film/BillAndTed'' and ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'', just to name a few. However, as musical tastes changed, and those teenagers grew into adults, and the new generation of teenagers had very different cultural and musical tastes, these satires obviously faded into history as products of their time. However, Otto stayed on, with his personality and mannerisms identical from the start. Tape players are extremely obsolete, but Otto still uses his. He still makes references to 1970s and 1980s rock bands, even though that was very clearly not the popular music when a man his age was a teenager. Lately, though, Otto just appears to make a drug reference or a joke about drug trips and hallucinations. There is also the odd, behind-the-scenes strangeness of Harry Shearer, a man in his mid-70s, still doing an 80s SurferDude voice.

to:

* Otto Mann, the school bus driver, is clearly a Simpsonized take of 1980s metal-head teenagers (despite being a man in his 30s), with the long hair, the constant obsessions with 1970s and 1980s rock bands, his musical skills, the "surfer dude" voice, his slacker attitude and casual substance abuse, and his ever-present tape player with large headphones. Characters like this were commonly satirized in the late 80s and early 90s, with ''Film/BillAndTed'' and ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'', ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'', just to name a few. However, as musical tastes changed, and those teenagers grew into adults, and the new generation of teenagers had very different cultural and musical tastes, these satires obviously faded into history as products of their time. However, Otto stayed on, with his personality and mannerisms identical from the start. Tape players are extremely obsolete, but Otto still uses his. He still makes references to 1970s and 1980s rock bands, even though that was very clearly not the popular music when a man his age was a teenager. Lately, though, Otto just appears to make a drug reference or a joke about drug trips and hallucinations. There is also the odd, behind-the-scenes strangeness of Harry Shearer, a man in his mid-70s, still doing an 80s SurferDude voice.



* The comic book shop, the Android's Dungeon. Back when the show was first created, places like that were treated as the main gathering place for nerd culture, and the idea of kids wandering into one to pick up a book was still entrenched in the American consciousness. After the UsefulNotes/TheGreatComicsCrashOf1993 and the advent of the internet, however, this is no longer the case, and most shops have either closed or converted into more general hobby shops. Nowadays, the idea that a comic shop could survive in Springfield, let alone have kids still interested in it, borders on absurd.

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* The comic book shop, the Android's Dungeon. Back when the show was first created, places like that were treated as the main gathering place for nerd culture, and the idea of kids wandering into one to pick up a book was still entrenched in the American consciousness. After the UsefulNotes/TheGreatComicsCrashOf1993 UsefulNotes/TheGreatComicsCrashOf1996 and the advent of the internet, however, this is no longer the case, and most shops have either closed or converted into more general hobby shops. Nowadays, the idea that a comic shop could survive in Springfield, let alone have kids still interested in it, borders on absurd.


* Even WhereTheHellIsSpringfield, an idea famous enough that it is the TropeNamer, is an example. The sitcoms that the show satirized were very intent on showing the idea of an All-American family, and thus very deliberately avoided identifying the state and used the VERY common town name of Springfield to create and mock that sense of "it could be anywhere". Granted, this was more reflective of the shows in the 1950s, such as ''Series/LeaveItToBeaver'', ''Series/FatherKnowsBest'' (which actually took place in a town called Springfield), and ''Series/TheAdventuresOfOzzieAndHarriet'', since most shows after the 1950s had a setting of a real location, usually a suburb of a prominent Midwestern or Northeastern city (the suburb or town itself is sometimes fictional, but its basic location is not). But Springfield was left jokingly vague, and blatant aversions and teases of outright stating the state was a humorous lampshading of such an idea. It eventually got to the point where Springfield's geographical location could not possibly exist in reality due to contradicting facts about it.

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* Even WhereTheHellIsSpringfield, an idea famous enough that it is the TropeNamer, is an example. The sitcoms that the show satirized were very intent on showing the idea of an All-American family, and thus very deliberately avoided identifying the state and used the VERY common town name of Springfield (there are over 30 Springfields across America - only Wisconsin has 5) to create and mock that sense of "it could be anywhere". Granted, this was more reflective of the shows in the 1950s, such as ''Series/LeaveItToBeaver'', ''Series/FatherKnowsBest'' (which actually took place in a town called Springfield), and ''Series/TheAdventuresOfOzzieAndHarriet'', since most shows after the 1950s had a setting of a real location, usually a suburb of a prominent Midwestern or Northeastern city (the suburb or town itself is sometimes fictional, but its basic location is not). But Springfield was left jokingly vague, and blatant aversions and teases of outright stating the state was a humorous lampshading of such an idea. It eventually got to the point where Springfield's geographical location could not possibly exist in reality due to contradicting facts about it.


* However, during all of this, no characters created in the first two seasons were redesigned. Marge has blue hair when literally no one else does (although Patty and Selma also have strange colored hair). Homer has one line around his head signifying baldness, when every other bald character in the show has more realistic, full sides of the head. Also, Homer's cylindrical head shape is not used with any other character since Season 2. Bart, Lisa, and Maggie are the only ones with hair color the same as their skin.

to:

* However, during all of this, no characters created in the first two seasons were redesigned. Marge has blue hair when literally no one else does (although Patty and Selma also have strange colored hair). Homer has one line around his head signifying baldness, when every other bald character in the show has more realistic, full sides of the head.head (e.g. Superintendent Chalmers or Kirk Van Houten). Also, Homer's cylindrical head shape is not used with any other character since Season 2. Bart, Lisa, and Maggie are the only ones with hair color the same as their skin.


* Even by Season 4 and 5, it was obvious what characters were created in which season, but since the appearance of the characters were so iconic, nobody really complained or took issue with it. However, after thirty years, and being surrounded by thousands of character designs that only get more detailed and crisper with each passing year, [[NonStandardCharacterDesign it is absurdly glaring that the Simpsons (and the original characters from the very early years) are just weirdly drawn people in an increasingly realistically drawn world.]]

to:

* Even by Season 4 and 5, it was obvious what characters were created in which season, but since the appearance of the characters were so iconic, nobody really complained or took issue with it. However, after thirty years, and being surrounded by thousands of character designs that only get more detailed and crisper with each passing year, [[NonStandardCharacterDesign it is absurdly glaring that the Simpsons (and the original characters from the very early years) are just weirdly drawn people in an increasingly realistically drawn world.]]world]] (except for the fact that every light-skinned person is still yellow and everyone still has FourFingeredHands).



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* As any long-running show, The Simpsons has undergone a lot of ArtEvolution. When the original Season 1 intro was reanimated for the second season, it still reused some traced-over animation from the former one, resulting in some of it being rather subtly clashing with the usual animation of the show, while also keeping some other quirks (such as Homer's pink sedan being a two-door). This version of the intro remained in use for many years until the high definition update in 2009.


** Despite all of this, episodes as late as 2018 still have Bart do this, and Moe still picks up on his old 1970s-era landline phone, as if it is still 1990 and he runs a lively, crowded bar.

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** Despite all of this, episodes as late as 2018 still have Bart do this, and Moe still picks up on his old 1970s-era landline phone, as if it is still 1990 and he runs a lively, crowded bar. Most recent occurrences tend to put some kind of twist on the format (such as Bart calling foreign bars in "Lost Verizon," sending Moe a telegram in "Helter Shelter," or medieval Bart sending a message via bird in "The Serfsons"), as the writers phased out the regular prank calls after five or six seasons because it was hard to come up with all the components of the gag (joke name, funny way for Moe to ask for the fake person, response from the barflies, and Moe's threats).


* Bumblebee Man was a parody of strange Spanish-language sitcoms found on obscure channels in the 90s (specifically, ''ElChapulinColorado''). Today, with Latino media being far more mainstream (both in the English and Spanish-speaking communities), most viewers, especially younger ones, will likely have no idea what he is supposed to be. This is slightly justified in that his appearances in more modern episodes are mostly reduced to crowd scenes, but sometimes he talks and has the same shtick he did in 1995.

to:

* Bumblebee Man was a parody of strange Spanish-language sitcoms found on obscure channels in the 90s (specifically, ''ElChapulinColorado'').''Series/ElChapulinColorado''). Today, with Latino media being far more mainstream (both in the English and Spanish-speaking communities), most viewers, especially younger ones, will likely have no idea what he is supposed to be. This is slightly justified in that his appearances in more modern episodes are mostly reduced to crowd scenes, but sometimes he talks and has the same shtick he did in 1995.


* Bumblebee Man was a parody of strange Spanish-language sitcoms found on obscure channels in the 90s. Today, with Latino media being far more mainstream (both in the English and Spanish-speaking communities), most viewers, especially younger ones, will likely have no idea what he is supposed to be. This is slightly justified in that his appearances in more modern episodes are mostly reduced to crowd scenes, but sometimes he talks and has the same shtick he did in 1995.

to:

* Bumblebee Man was a parody of strange Spanish-language sitcoms found on obscure channels in the 90s.90s (specifically, ''ElChapulinColorado''). Today, with Latino media being far more mainstream (both in the English and Spanish-speaking communities), most viewers, especially younger ones, will likely have no idea what he is supposed to be. This is slightly justified in that his appearances in more modern episodes are mostly reduced to crowd scenes, but sometimes he talks and has the same shtick he did in 1995.


** Had ''the Simpsons'' wrapped up in the late 90s, it would be very fondly remembered as basically the father of modern television comedy, especially of animated comedy. However, since it stayed on, TV writers and producers started making shows inspired by the Simpsons's style and humor (and now, shows from people inspired by the Simpsons from watching it as children and/or teenagers). The Simpsons now has to compete with a landscape it inspired and created, against people creating parody using methods and writing styles that have since evolved and improved significantly since the 90s. A show usually does not have to do this because by the time a show fully creates such a landscape, it has already ended.

to:

** Had ''the Simpsons'' wrapped up in the late 90s, it would be very fondly remembered as basically the father of modern television comedy, especially of animated comedy. However, since it stayed on, Since the 90s, TV writers and producers started making shows inspired by the Simpsons's style and humor (and now, shows from people inspired by the Simpsons from watching it as children and/or teenagers). The Simpsons now has to compete with a landscape it inspired and created, against people creating parody using methods and writing styles that have since evolved and improved significantly since significantly. And now THOSE shows have inspired a new wave of writers and producers, with shows that begin and end and allow for a seamless evolution of entertainment while the Simpsons will always have its origins rooted firmly in the early 90s. A show usually does not have to do this go through this, because by the time a show fully creates such a landscape, it has already ended.



* The hatred that Homer has for Ned Flanders makes no sense anymore due to how dynamics have shifted. At the beginning of the show, Homer's resentment of Flanders was out of pure jealousy. Flanders had the family Homer wished he had: a beautiful and caring wife, well behaved and loving kids, enough money to live very comfortably, and beloved by the town. And while Homer could be miserable, Flanders was always cheerful -- the origin of Flanders's religiosity was simply that, while Homer struggled to even stay awake in church, Flanders actively looked forward to it. [[ThisLoserIsYou The Simpsons were the dumpy, everyman family constantly beaten down by the world]], [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter and the Flanderses were the successful, perfect neighbors.]] But as the show went on, the Simpsons became less beaten down and soon most episodes were about how awesome their lives were. Money never seems to be an issue anymore, and the Flanderses have completely changed. Maude was killed off, Ned turned from the perfect neighbor into a nosy, crazily religious moralizer, and Rod and Todd turned from naive and good-behaved to creepily sheltered. It makes absolutely no sense for Homer to be jealous of him.
** Ned's {{Flanderization}} is an example of this in itself because it shows the writers forgetting the point behind a joke, namely that Ned was ''supposed'' to be a traditional sitcom dad compared to the subversion that Homer was, with his religiosity being another symbol of him as a "ideal" American father. Once that archetype had vanished from the American consciousness (if anything, the BumblingDad is now the norm and Ned is now the subversion), the Flanders family was left without any kind of role. Thus, the idea of them being obsessed with religion, despite the already ''having'' a character (Reverend Lovejoy) who was used to comment on religion since the early seasons.

to:

* The hatred that Homer has for Ned Flanders makes no sense anymore due to how dynamics have shifted. At the beginning of the show, Homer's resentment of Flanders was out of pure jealousy. Flanders had the family Homer wished he had: a beautiful and caring wife, well behaved and loving kids, enough money to live very comfortably, and beloved by the town. And while Homer could be miserable, Flanders was always cheerful -- the origin of Flanders's religiosity was simply that, while Homer struggled to even stay awake in church, Flanders actively looked forward to it. [[ThisLoserIsYou The Simpsons were the dumpy, everyman family constantly beaten down by the world]], [[AlwaysSomeoneBetter and the Flanderses were the successful, perfect neighbors.]] But as the show went on, the Simpsons became less beaten down and soon most episodes were about how awesome their lives were. Money never seems to be an issue anymore, and the Flanderses have completely changed. Maude was killed off, Ned turned from the perfect neighbor into a goofy but nosy, crazily religious moralizer, and Rod and Todd turned from naive and good-behaved to creepily sheltered. It makes absolutely no sense for Homer to be jealous of him.
** Ned's {{Flanderization}} is an example of this in itself because it shows the writers forgetting the point behind a joke, namely that Ned was ''supposed'' to be a traditional sitcom dad compared to the subversion that Homer was, with his religiosity being another symbol of him as a "ideal" American father. Once that archetype had vanished from the American consciousness (if anything, the BumblingDad is now the norm and Ned is now the subversion), the Flanders family was left without any kind of role. Thus, the idea of them being obsessed with religion, despite the already ''having'' a character (Reverend Lovejoy) who was used to comment on religion since the early seasons.



* The Blue-Haired Lawyer (he is never given a name onscreen, nor is it AllThereInTheManual) is shown to be Mr. Burns' attorney (or lead attorney), as well as the attorney for most businesses and wealthy people in Springfield, and also is a defense attorney for the government occasionally. Unlike many of the other lawyers in the show, he is shown to be extremely competent and diligent, and [[AmoralAttorney defends his client very ruthlessly and professionally]]. His nasally voice with the New York accent is clearly based on that of Roy Cohn, the New York attorney most famous for helping Wisconsin Senator Joseph [=McCarthy=] conduct his Communism witch hunts in the early to mid 50s, being UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's lawyer in the 1970s, and for being revealed as gay and dying of AIDS in 1986. Despite his death, Cohn was very well-known in the 1990s for his very cutthroat, ruthless messaging and methods, and his using of [=McCarthyism=] to basically blacklist and exterminate any political opponents. However, since the 90s, he has mostly faded into history, with newer generations knowing little about him, so today he is just a lawyer with an unnecessarily silly voice that only masks his competence instead of exemplifying it.

to:

* The Blue-Haired Lawyer (he is never given a name onscreen, nor is it AllThereInTheManual) is shown to be Mr. Burns' attorney (or lead attorney), as well as the attorney for most businesses and wealthy people in Springfield, and also is a defense attorney for the government occasionally. Unlike many of the other lawyers in the show, he is shown to be extremely competent and diligent, and [[AmoralAttorney defends his client very ruthlessly and professionally]]. His nasally voice with the New York accent is clearly based on that of Roy Cohn, the New York attorney most famous for helping Wisconsin Senator Joseph [=McCarthy=] conduct his Communism witch hunts in the early to mid 50s, being UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's lawyer in the 1970s, 1970s (as well as the lawyer for many of New York's prominent businessmen and mafiosos), and for being revealed as gay and dying of AIDS in 1986.1986 (although while dying, he insisted it was liver cancer). Despite his death, Cohn was very well-known in the 1990s for his very cutthroat, ruthless messaging and methods, and his using of [=McCarthyism=] to basically blacklist and exterminate any political opponents. However, since the 90s, he has mostly faded into history, with newer generations knowing little about him, so today he the Blue-Haired Lawyer is just a lawyer with an unnecessarily silly voice that only masks his competence instead of exemplifying it.



** UsefulNotes/{{Connecticut}} State Senator Edward Kennedy Jr., Ted Kennedy's older son, was elected in 2014, but decided to not seek re-election in 2018.

to:

** UsefulNotes/{{Connecticut}} State Senator Edward Kennedy Jr., Ted Kennedy's older son, was elected in 2014, but decided to not seek re-election left office in 2018.2019.



* Otto Mann, the school bus driver, is clearly a pastiche of 1980s metal-head teenagers (despite being a man in his 30s), with the long hair, the constant obsessions with 1970s and 1980s rock bands, his musical skills, the "surfer dude" voice, his slacker attitude and casual substance abuse, and his ever-present tape player with large headphones. Characters like this were commonly satirized in the late 80s and early 90s, with ''Film/BillAndTed'' and ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'', just to name a few. However, as musical tastes changed, and those teenagers grew into adults, and the new generation of teenagers had very different cultural and musical tastes, these satires obviously faded into history as products of their time. However, Otto stayed on, with his personality and mannerisms identical from the start. Tape players are extremely obsolete, but Otto still uses his. He still makes references to 1970s and 1980s rock bands, even though that was very clearly not the popular music when a man his age was a teenager. Lately, though, Otto just appears to make a drug reference or a joke about drug trips and hallucinations. There is also the odd, behind-the-scenes strangeness of Harry Shearer, a man in his mid-70s, still doing an 80s SurferDude voice.

to:

* Otto Mann, the school bus driver, is clearly a pastiche Simpsonized take of 1980s metal-head teenagers (despite being a man in his 30s), with the long hair, the constant obsessions with 1970s and 1980s rock bands, his musical skills, the "surfer dude" voice, his slacker attitude and casual substance abuse, and his ever-present tape player with large headphones. Characters like this were commonly satirized in the late 80s and early 90s, with ''Film/BillAndTed'' and ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'', just to name a few. However, as musical tastes changed, and those teenagers grew into adults, and the new generation of teenagers had very different cultural and musical tastes, these satires obviously faded into history as products of their time. However, Otto stayed on, with his personality and mannerisms identical from the start. Tape players are extremely obsolete, but Otto still uses his. He still makes references to 1970s and 1980s rock bands, even though that was very clearly not the popular music when a man his age was a teenager. Lately, though, Otto just appears to make a drug reference or a joke about drug trips and hallucinations. There is also the odd, behind-the-scenes strangeness of Harry Shearer, a man in his mid-70s, still doing an 80s SurferDude voice.


* The Blue-Haired Lawyer (he is never given a name onscreen, nor is it AllThereInTheManual) is shown to be Mr. Burn's attorney (or lead attorney), as well as the attorney for most businesses and wealthy people in Springfield, and also is a defense attorney for the government occasionally. Unlike many of the other lawyers in the show, he is shown to be extremely competent and diligent, and [[AmoralAttorney defends his client very ruthlessly and professionally]]. His nasally voice with the New York accent is clearly based on that of Roy Cohn, the New York attorney most famous for helping Wisconsin Senator Joseph [=McCarthy=] conduct his Communism witch hunts in the early to mid 50s, being UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's lawyer in the 1970s, and for being revealed as gay and dying of AIDS in 1986. Despite his death, Cohn was very well-known in the 1990s for his very cutthroat, ruthless messaging and methods, and his using of [=McCarthyism=] to basically blacklist and exterminate any political opponents. However, since the 90s, he has mostly faded into history, with newer generations knowing little about him, so today he is just a lawyer with an unnecessarily silly voice that only masks his competence instead of exemplifying it.

to:

* The Blue-Haired Lawyer (he is never given a name onscreen, nor is it AllThereInTheManual) is shown to be Mr. Burn's Burns' attorney (or lead attorney), as well as the attorney for most businesses and wealthy people in Springfield, and also is a defense attorney for the government occasionally. Unlike many of the other lawyers in the show, he is shown to be extremely competent and diligent, and [[AmoralAttorney defends his client very ruthlessly and professionally]]. His nasally voice with the New York accent is clearly based on that of Roy Cohn, the New York attorney most famous for helping Wisconsin Senator Joseph [=McCarthy=] conduct his Communism witch hunts in the early to mid 50s, being UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump's lawyer in the 1970s, and for being revealed as gay and dying of AIDS in 1986. Despite his death, Cohn was very well-known in the 1990s for his very cutthroat, ruthless messaging and methods, and his using of [=McCarthyism=] to basically blacklist and exterminate any political opponents. However, since the 90s, he has mostly faded into history, with newer generations knowing little about him, so today he is just a lawyer with an unnecessarily silly voice that only masks his competence instead of exemplifying it.

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