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* In "Diamond in the Rough", Blanche courts a very handsome and kindly caterer named Jake who seems to be everything a woman could want in a man, and he quickly wins over all the girls with his good looks and demeanor. However, Blanche starts having her doubts about him, taking issue with many minor things about his style and mannerisms like she believes he's too good to be true. Jake, however ,is a complete gentleman and so Blanche's complaints leave the other girls baffled, especially when she decides to go out with another friend to the very dinner Jake has been hired to cater. That evening, Blanche expects Jake to ask her out to the dance, and he comes in seemingly to ask that very question.

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* In "Diamond in the Rough", Blanche courts a very handsome and kindly caterer named Jake who seems to be everything a woman could want in a man, and he quickly wins over all the girls with his good looks and demeanor. However, Blanche starts having her doubts about him, taking issue with many minor things about his style and mannerisms like she believes he's too good to be true. Jake, however ,is however, is a complete gentleman and so Blanche's complaints leave the other girls baffled, especially when she decides to go out with another friend to the very dinner Jake has been hired to cater. That evening, Blanche expects Jake to ask her out to the dance, and he comes in seemingly to ask that very question.


* In one episode, Sophia learns a friend from Shady Pines named Lilian has been transferred to Sunny Pastures, which Sophia explains is the bottom of the barrel for nursing homes. It turns out she's not exaggerating, although we learn this is because it doesn't have enough funding, and the guy who runs Sunny Pastures is trying to do the best he can despite the aggravating bureaucratic procedures it takes to the run the place. Sophia conspires to break Lilian out, and does, but we learn that she's genuinely senile and suffering from either dementia or Alzheimer's. Sophia runs herself ragged taking care of Lilian, until the girls manage to find a better nursing home for her. Dorothy comments that everything worked out okay... but wonders why she doesn't feel better. Blanche mentions something along the lines of "because there are places out there that are worse than Sunny Pastures and Lilian just got lucky."

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* In one episode, Sophia learns a friend from Shady Pines named Lilian has been transferred to Sunny Pastures, which Sophia explains is the bottom of the barrel for nursing homes. It turns out she's not exaggerating, although we learn this is because it doesn't have enough funding, and the guy who runs Sunny Pastures is trying to do the best he can despite the aggravating bureaucratic procedures it takes to the run the place. Sophia conspires to break Lilian out, and does, but we learn that she's genuinely senile and suffering from either dementia or Alzheimer's. Sophia runs herself ragged taking care of Lilian, until the girls manage to find a better nursing home for her. Dorothy comments that everything worked out okay... but wonders why she doesn't feel better. Blanche mentions something along the lines of "because there are places out there that are worse than Sunny Pastures and Lilian just got lucky."


-->'''Rose''': And... he told me he loved me... and... then it was over. And I put a pair of gray flannel pants on him. And a blue shirt... and a striped tie. ''(Voice breaking)'' And he was all dressed when the paramedics got there.

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-->'''Rose''': And... he told me he loved me... and... then it was over. And I put a pair of gray flannel pants on him. And a blue shirt... and a striped tie. ''(Voice breaking)'' And he was all dressed when the paramedics got there. [[note]]It has been suggested that Creator/BettyWhite broke character when her voice broke and she was talking instead about her beloved husband Allen Ludden.[[/note]]

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** What makes it's especially important is that Dorothy, Rose and Sophia talk about what they would do for their family, they agree that if it was for their children it would be no doubt they would give their heart if needed.


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** In fact most of her children have cut ties with her or only speak to her if they have to.


--->'''Sophia''': And I can see yours, you know what that tells me? You're not as ready to die as you think you are. You still wanna live, kid!

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--->'''Sophia''': And I can see yours, you know what that tells me? me?
--->'''Martha''': [voice breaking] What?
--->'''Sophia''':
You're not as ready to die as you think you are. You still wanna live, kid!


* In "And Then There Was One", the girls were taking care of children during the Charity Walk-A-Thon, Emily one the babies is still unclaimed,

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* Regularly in the show Blanche is shown to have a poor relationship with her children:
** She regularly talks about she had maids and nannies to care for them and didn't realise she pushed them away until it was too late.
**
In "And Then There Was One", the girls were taking care of children during the Charity Walk-A-Thon, Emily one the babies is still unclaimed,unclaimed, Blanche despite being unmaternal is the only that can soothe the girl and she is starting to be Motherly towards the baby. However at the end Emily is returned with her Father who did call that he would be late but Sophia misheard it, Blanche sadly waves her off, she then calls Janet asking if she can visit her, Janet refuses until she hears the feeling in Blanche's voice and relents.

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* In Transplant, Blanche's sister Virginia arrives for a visit, despite her describing their childhood as negative because of her, Virginia is surprisingly polite, however the truth because she needs Blanche's help. She needs a kidney transplant, Blanche is unsure what to do, but on her last visit Virginia gives Blanche a deep emotional hug goodbye, Blanche visible realises she needs to help her sister. However Blanche returns early as they couldn't use her kidney, but found a suitable donor.


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* In "And Then There Was One", the girls were taking care of children during the Charity Walk-A-Thon, Emily one the babies is still unclaimed,

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* The entirety of "Blind Ambitions", where Rose's elder sister Lily comes for a visit while she copes with having recently become blind. Despite putting on a brave face and asserting her usual independence, Lily is shown to be distraught and frightened at her situation and no longer knows how to manage on her own. Rose tries her best to help her cope, initially in denial about how helpless her sister has become and then finds herself struggling to decide what's the best thing to help Lily get her life back. Lily eventually admits how scared she is and begs Rose to come back to Chicago with her to help her. Her tearful breakdown as Rose tries to console is truly gutwrenching to watch.


** In the same episode, Kirsten is shocked by how meager Rose's estate is, as she assumed that Charlie left her a massive sum of money due to his great success as a salesman. Rose explains that she lost most of that inheritance through bad investments and business deals, and Kirsten dresses her down for it in a very nasty (albeit somewhat justified) way. Blanche and Dorothy are suspicious, and Rose eventually confesses that she was actually lying about Charlie's wealth--he was only a mediocre salesman at best and didn't leave her all that much in the first place, but since she's spent her whole life telling stories about his skill, she can't bring herself to tell Kirsten the truth. It's a heartrending example of ParentsAsPeople--Rose was genuinely trying to make Charlie seem like a hero in her children's eyes, and is willing to take that lie to the grave with her (and risk the anger of all of her children while doing it). Thankfully, she eventually admits the whole story to Kirsten, who is much more understanding once she knows the facts.

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** In the same episode, Kirsten is shocked by how meager Rose's estate is, as she assumed that Charlie left her a massive sum of money due to his great success as a salesman. Rose explains that she lost most of that inheritance through bad investments and business deals, and Kirsten dresses her down for it in a very nasty (albeit somewhat justified) way. Blanche and Dorothy are suspicious, and Rose eventually confesses that she was actually lying about Charlie's wealth--he was only a mediocre salesman at best and didn't leave her all that much in the first place, but since she's spent her whole life telling stories about his skill, she can't bring herself to tell Kirsten the truth. It's a heartrending example of ParentsAsPeople--Rose was genuinely trying to make Charlie seem like a hero in her children's family's eyes, and is willing to take that lie to the grave with her (and risk the anger of all of her children while doing it). Thankfully, after some ObliviousGuiltSlinging by her granddaughter Charlene (who explains that a fairy-tale grandfather she invented is "very, very rich"), Rose eventually admits the whole story to Kirsten, who is much more understanding once she knows the facts.


* Even this throwaway joke from the first season: Rose tells her daughter she keeps her will in the cookie jar. It's sweet and sad when you remember that Rose lost her Charlie...

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* Even this throwaway joke from the first season: Rose tells her daughter Kirsten she keeps her will in the cookie jar. It's sweet and sad when you remember that Rose lost her Charlie...


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** In the same episode, Kirsten is shocked by how meager Rose's estate is, as she assumed that Charlie left her a massive sum of money due to his great success as a salesman. Rose explains that she lost most of that inheritance through bad investments and business deals, and Kirsten dresses her down for it in a very nasty (albeit somewhat justified) way. Blanche and Dorothy are suspicious, and Rose eventually confesses that she was actually lying about Charlie's wealth--he was only a mediocre salesman at best and didn't leave her all that much in the first place, but since she's spent her whole life telling stories about his skill, she can't bring herself to tell Kirsten the truth. It's a heartrending example of ParentsAsPeople--Rose was genuinely trying to make Charlie seem like a hero in her children's eyes, and is willing to take that lie to the grave with her (and risk the anger of all of her children while doing it). Thankfully, she eventually admits the whole story to Kirsten, who is much more understanding once she knows the facts.

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** The whole episode becomes especially poignant because Susan Harris, who created the show, actually suffered from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome herself and likely faced the same issues that Dorothy does.


** The scene where Rose urges Blanche to make peace with George is particularly gutting, because she begs Blanche to "do it for all of us who wish we had the chance." Even though we see her move on and date other men, even seriously, Rose never really gets over losing her husband Charlie.

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** The scene where Rose urges Blanche to make peace with George is particularly gutting, gutting. She admits that she's actually envious of Blanche, because she begs she's been given the opportunity to see the love of her life again. Rose further says that she'd trade ''anything'' to see her husband Charlie one more time for just five minutes, and urges Blanche to "do it for see George "for all of us who wish we had the chance." Even though we see her move on and date other men, even seriously, Rose never really gets over losing her husband Charlie.



** One particularly painful moment shows up when Rose loses her temper at Blanche and tells her that, of all people, she shouldn't have to deal with AIDS, because she's a "good person." Given that, when the episode was filmed, a large subset of the U.S. population ''genuinely believed'' that HIV and AIDS were a kind of "divine judgment" on groups like gay men, promiscuous individuals, and people of color, hearing Rose--usually the sweetest character--parrot such harmful views stings deeply. Thankfully, Blanche puts her in her place in a [[Awesome/TheGoldenGirls MomentOfAwesome]]: "AIDS is not a ''bad'' person's disease, Rose. It is not God punishing people for their sins."

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** One particularly painful moment shows up when Rose loses her temper at Blanche and tells her that, of all people, she shouldn't have to deal with AIDS, because she's a "good person." Given that, when the episode was filmed, a large subset of the U.S. population ''genuinely believed'' that HIV and AIDS were a kind of "divine judgment" on groups like gay men, promiscuous individuals, and people of color, hearing Rose--usually the sweetest character--parrot such harmful views stings deeply. Thankfully, Blanche puts her in her place in a [[Awesome/TheGoldenGirls MomentOfAwesome]]: Moment of Awesome]]: "AIDS is not a ''bad'' person's disease, Rose. It is not God punishing people for their sins."



* In the two-parter "Sick and Tired," Dorothy suffers from a mysterious case of exhaustion that won't go away--it's been months, and she sometimes can't work up enough strength to speak in front of her students or even lift her arms to wash her hair. She goes to see doctor after doctor--all men--who repeatedly tell her that she's just getting older and should try something like a dye job. She mostly deals with these opinions in her usual DeadpanSnarker manner...but towards the end of the first part of the episode, after traveling to New York to see a world-renowned specialist and ''still'' being dismissed, she breaks down absolutely sobbing in Rose's arms, admitting that she's losing all hope and fears that she's going insane because no one will listen to her. Thankfully, the second part of the episode has her friend [[Series/EmptyNest Harry Weston]], himself a doctor, actually treat her with empathy and send her to a specialist who correctly diagnoses her with chronic fatigue syndrome.
** At the end of the first episode, Sophia confesses to Rose and Blanche that she's absolutely terrified about Dorothy. She admits that she wouldn't feel right if she outlived one of her own children (which hits especially hard when you remember that, in a later episode, her son Phil passes away), and remarks that she's losing hope, too: "Dorothy could be ''dying'' and we don't know it."



** Stan saying goodbye to Dorothy.

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** Stan saying goodbye to Dorothy.Dorothy by secretly replacing her limo driver and pulling off to the side of the road. He gives a heartfelt speech about how, despite his philandering and marriages to two other women, he will ''always'' consider Dorothy the true love of his life and never forget her.


** One particularly painful moment shows up when Rose loses her temper at Blanche and tells her that, of all people, she shouldn't have to deal with AIDS, because she's a "good person." Given that, when the episode was filmed, a large subset of the U.S. population ''genuinely believed'' that HIV and AIDS were a kind of "divine judgment" on groups like gay men, promiscuous individuals, and people of color, hearing Rose--usually the sweetest character--parrot such harmful views stings deeply. Thankfully, Blanche puts her in her place in a [[SugarWiki/Awesome/TheGoldenGirls MomentOfAwesome]]: "AIDS is not a ''bad'' person's disease, Rose. It is not God punishing people for their sins."

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** One particularly painful moment shows up when Rose loses her temper at Blanche and tells her that, of all people, she shouldn't have to deal with AIDS, because she's a "good person." Given that, when the episode was filmed, a large subset of the U.S. population ''genuinely believed'' that HIV and AIDS were a kind of "divine judgment" on groups like gay men, promiscuous individuals, and people of color, hearing Rose--usually the sweetest character--parrot such harmful views stings deeply. Thankfully, Blanche puts her in her place in a [[SugarWiki/Awesome/TheGoldenGirls [[Awesome/TheGoldenGirls MomentOfAwesome]]: "AIDS is not a ''bad'' person's disease, Rose. It is not God punishing people for their sins."


** One particularly painful moment shows up when Rose loses her temper at Blanche and tells her that, of all people, she shouldn't have to deal with AIDS, because she's a "good person." Given that, when the episode was filmed, a large subset of the U.S. population ''genuinely believed'' that HIV and AIDS were a kind of "divine judgment" on groups like gay men, promiscuous individuals, and people of color, hearing Rose--usually the sweetest character--parrot such harmful views stings deeply. Thankfully, Blanche puts her in her place in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome: "AIDS is not a ''bad'' person's disease, Rose. It is not God punishing people for their sins."

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** One particularly painful moment shows up when Rose loses her temper at Blanche and tells her that, of all people, she shouldn't have to deal with AIDS, because she's a "good person." Given that, when the episode was filmed, a large subset of the U.S. population ''genuinely believed'' that HIV and AIDS were a kind of "divine judgment" on groups like gay men, promiscuous individuals, and people of color, hearing Rose--usually the sweetest character--parrot such harmful views stings deeply. Thankfully, Blanche puts her in her place in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome: [[SugarWiki/Awesome/TheGoldenGirls MomentOfAwesome]]: "AIDS is not a ''bad'' person's disease, Rose. It is not God punishing people for their sins."


* Rose's observations on a local homeless woman in "Rose Fights Back", and her fears that she could end up like that woman if she can't find a job after losing Charlie's pension.

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* Rose's observations on a local homeless woman in "Rose Fights Back", and her fears that she could end up like that woman if she can't find a job after losing Charlie's pension. She explains that, after assuming that woman was just lazy or stupid for getting herself into a bad situation, she's finally noticed that the lady is actually [[NotSoDifferent the exact same age as she is.]] Rose's line at the end of the monologue--"What am I going to ''do?''"--hits hard, as she realizes that she, and countless others, are just as close to desperation as the bag lady.



** One particularly painful moment shows up when Rose loses her temper at Blanche and tells her that, of all people, she shouldn't have to deal with AIDS, because she's a "good person." Given that, when the episode was filmed, a large subset of the U.S. population ''genuinely believed'' that HIV and AIDS were a kind of "divine judgment" on groups like gay men, promiscuous individuals, and people of color, hearing Rose--usually the sweetest character--parrot such harmful views stings deeply. Thankfully, Blanche puts her in her place in a CrowningMomentOfAwesome: "AIDS is not a ''bad'' person's disease, Rose. It is not God punishing people for their sins."



** Dorothy gets another, smaller moment at the end of the episode. When Blanche asks if Dorothy ever feels jealous of her, Dorothy says, with genuine pain in her voice, "Every day of my life." Given how much Dorothy's HollywoodHomely looks are made the butt of jokes on the show, she's deeply affected by her own insecurities.

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** Dorothy gets another, smaller moment at the end of the episode. When Blanche asks if Dorothy ever feels jealous of her, Dorothy says, with genuine pain in her voice, "Every day of my life." Given how much Dorothy's HollywoodHomely looks are made the butt of jokes on the show, that one line reveals that she's deeply affected by her own insecurities.



* "All Bets Are Off" centers around Dorothy's [[CompressedVice gambling addiction]] resurfacing and spiraling out of control. It all culminates when she tries to trick Rose into giving her the money to pay off a bookie. At first, it seems Rose is just being overly trusting of Dorothy's obvious lies. It even bothers Dorothy, who responds to Rose saying she trusts her completely by telling her she's being naive. When Rose insists that, if she can't trust a dear friend like Dorothy, whom can she trust, Dorothy flat out yells, "I am stealing your money!" Rose just calmly tells her, "I know that, Dorothy. I just hope you'd have a hard time taking advantage of someone who cares about you as much as I do." This gets Dorothy to tearfully admit she needs help.

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* "All Bets Are Off" centers around Dorothy's [[CompressedVice gambling addiction]] resurfacing and spiraling out of control. It all culminates when she tries to trick Rose into giving her the money to pay off a bookie. At first, it seems Rose is just being overly trusting of Dorothy's obvious lies. It even bothers Dorothy, who responds to Rose saying she trusts her completely by telling her she's being naive. When Rose insists that, if she can't trust a dear friend like Dorothy, whom can she trust, Dorothy flat out yells, "I am stealing your money!" Rose just calmly tells her, "I know that, ''know'', Dorothy. I was just hope hoping that you'd have a hard time taking advantage of someone who cares about you as much as I do." This gets Dorothy to tearfully admit she needs help.



* In "Break-In," the girls are victims of a robbery. Dorothy and Blanche each had something stolen, [[PostRobberyTrauma but it is Rose who suffers the most.]] She can't sleep at night, she buys herself self-defense weapons including a gun, and even a visit to a psychiatrist doesn't help. One night Blanche and a suitor of hers comes home and startles Rose who shot her gun at Blanches vase.

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* In "Break-In," the girls are victims of a robbery. Dorothy and Blanche each had something stolen, [[PostRobberyTrauma but it is Rose who suffers the most.]] She can't sleep at night, she buys herself self-defense weapons including a gun, and even a visit to a psychiatrist doesn't help. One night Blanche and a suitor of hers comes come home and startles Rose Rose, who shot her gun blindly opens fire at Blanches vase.the front door (she luckily only hits Blanche's Chinese vase, but could have easily hurt or even ''killed'' the two of them instead).


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* In "In a Bed of Rose's," Rose and her new boyfriend Al finally have sex...and Al [[OutWithABang dies during the act.]] She goes to tell Lucille, Al's sister and roommate, only to discover that he was actually her ''husband.'' Lucille is surprisingly nonchalant about it, as Al was a serial cheater who slept with everyone who came his way (apparently, the first time he ever had sex with another woman was [[UpToEleven on his and Lucille's honeymoon.]] She assumes that Rose is only there to reveal the philandering as an act of revenge, but when Rose actually tells her what happened, she's stunned and goes into denial.
-->'''Lucille''': I'm talking, so it can't be true, you know what I mean? If I keep talking...it isn't true. All I have to do is talk forever...

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