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* The Cannon moves like a rook. It leaps over another piece to capture. (It can capture any piece with another piece between them, on the lines of movement.) It cannot leap unless it captures. Each player has two.

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* The Cannon moves like a rook. It leaps over another piece (a "screen") to capture. (It can capture any piece with another piece between them, on the lines of movement.) It cannot leap unless it captures. Each player has two.



* AuthorityEqualsAsskicking: In some rules of the game, the general can OneHitKill the enemy general if you have a clear line of sight.

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* AuthorityEqualsAsskicking: In some rules of the game, the general can OneHitKill the enemy general if you have a clear line of sight. This never happens in practice, as exposing your general allows the enemy to take yours in response, but is used to set up checkmates and restrict the opposing general's movement.



* TheGuardsMustBeCrazy: One's own Advisors often get in one's own General's way. Furthermore, until one of them is captured, each move with one either blocks or unblocks the other.

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* TheGuardsMustBeCrazy: One's own Advisors often get in one's own General's way. Furthermore, until one of them is captured, each move with one either blocks or unblocks the other. Their main use is as {{Human Shield}}s against things like Horses and Chariots, but this also makes them great screens for the enemy's Cannons; in fact, emptying the center file and controlling it with one's Cannons is a huge advantage, since this turns Advisors and Elephants into liabilities.



* {{Nerf}}: The General can only move orthogonally, and is stuck inside the palace.

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* MechanicallyUnusualClass: The Cannon is unique among pieces in that its movement and capture rules differ. It can move any number of spaces in the orthogonal directions, but to capture, it must jump over exactly one piece, friend or foe.
* {{Nerf}}: Compared to their Chess and Chaturanga counterparts, certain pieces are weaker:
**
The General can only move orthogonally, and is stuck inside the palace.3x3 palace.
** The Horse is unable to jump over pieces adjacent to it.



* TookALevelInBadass: Pawns when they cross the river.

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* TookALevelInBadass: Pawns when they cross the river. Unlike the Western version, they don't promote into more powerful pieces, but they ''do'' get the ability to move sideways.


* TheChessmaster: You, if you're good enough.



* TheChessmaster: You, if you're good enough


* OneHitPointWonder

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* OneHitPointWonderOneHitPointWonder: All the pieces of the game, just like the game's Western Counterpart. A Pawn can take down a stronger piece such as a Rook, and vice versa.


* {{Oh Crap}} / {{Didnt See That Coming}}: the Cannon, one wrong piece placement and your once impregnable defenses gets a massive hole blown in it.
** The Cannon has no distance limit, so it can take pieces from the other side of the board.


* PressStartToGameOver: 1[== Cbe3 Che7 2 Ch5 Cb4??; 3 Cxe6+! Cxe4??; 4 Ce5#==] 1-0

to:

* PressStartToGameOver: 1[== 1[= Cbe3 Che7 2 Ch5 Cb4??; 3 Cxe6+! Cxe4??; 4 Ce5#==] Ce5#=] 1-0


* PressStartToGameOver: 1 Cbe3 Che7 2 Ch5 Cb4??; 3 Cxe6+! Cxe4??; 4 Ce5# 1-0

to:

* PressStartToGameOver: 1 1[== Cbe3 Che7 2 Ch5 Cb4??; 3 Cxe6+! Cxe4??; 4 Ce5# Ce5#==] 1-0

Added DiffLines:

* PressStartToGameOver: 1 Cbe3 Che7 2 Ch5 Cb4??; 3 Cxe6+! Cxe4??; 4 Ce5# 1-0


* AllThereInTheManual: Averted for anyone who doesn't read Chinese. Although there are chess books in Chinese, most are relatively recent and in Chinese only, and there's only a very few scattered books written in other languages. The pages and pages of hyperfocused analysis that make up western chess literature isn't nearly as vast (or obsessive) for xiangqi.

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* AllThereInTheManual: Averted for anyone who doesn't read Chinese. Although there are chess books in Chinese, most are relatively recent and in Chinese only, and there's only a very few scattered books written in other languages. The pages and pages of hyperfocused analysis that make up western chess literature isn't nearly as vast (or obsessive) for xiangqi.Xiangqi.
** In the early 21st century, some of the classic manuals got translated into English. And while the strategy is occasionally a bit dated, the warnings about traps and blunders still hold.
* AttackPatternAlpha: Openings like the Central Cannon Attack[=/=]Defense (moving a Cannon to the central file on the first move), Screen Horse Attack[=/=]Defense (developing the Horses to files 3 and 7 before moving any Cannons), etc.



* TheGuardsMustBeCrazy: One's own Advisors often get in one's own General's way.

to:

* TheGuardsMustBeCrazy: One's own Advisors often get in one's own General's way. Furthermore, until one of them is captured, each move with one either blocks or unblocks the other.


** The Pawns and Generals use completely different characters for opposite sides. In practice, players just call both variations of both pieces by the same name, even if that name does not match how the character would be read outside the context of the game.

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** The Pawns and Generals use completely different characters for opposite sides. In practice, players often just call both variations of both pieces by the same name, even if that name does not match how the character would be read outside the context of the game.


** The Pawns and Generals use completely different characters for opposite sides. In practice, players just call them all by the same name, even if that name does not match how the character would be read outside the context of the game.

to:

** The Pawns and Generals use completely different characters for opposite sides. In practice, players just call them all both variations of both pieces by the same name, even if that name does not match how the character would be read outside the context of the game.


* GlassCannon: The Chariot (Rook) is the most powerful piece -- but even a Pawn can take it down. Likewise for the actual Cannon.

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* GlassCannon: The Chariot (Rook) is the most powerful piece -- but even a Pawn can take it down. Likewise for the actual Cannon.Cannon which, as noted below, has no range restrictions and can make a serious mess of things, but gets taken out just like any other piece.


* GlassCannon: The Chariot (Rook) is the most powerful piece -- but even a Pawn can take it down.

to:

* GlassCannon: The Chariot (Rook) is the most powerful piece -- but even a Pawn can take it down. Likewise for the actual Cannon.



** The Pawns and Generals have different names for opposite sides.

to:

** The Pawns and Generals have use completely different names characters for opposite sides.sides. In practice, players just call them all by the same name, even if that name does not match how the character would be read outside the context of the game.


When the game of Chaturanga moved into China, it was merged with another game to produce Xiangqi, pronounced roughly ''shiang-chee'' in Mandarin [[note]]Or something like "jeung-kei" in Cantonese, which is the common language of quite a few Chinatowns.[[/note]], and known in English as "Chinese Chess". The disk-shaped pieces[[note]]The checker-like shape of xiangqi pieces leads to people occasionally confusing xiangqi and the very, very different Chinese checkers, which is played with marbles.[[/note]] are placed on the vertices rather than in the squares. The board has ten ranks and nine files. Between the fifth and sixth files is a feature called the river. A 3x3 square in the middle back of each player's side is referred to as the palace. [[note]]There is also a Western-style board using Staunton-like pieces called the Cambaluc (after an old Mongol name for Beijing). It was only produced by one company and is fairly rare.[[/note]]

to:

When the game of Chaturanga moved into China, it was merged with another game to produce Xiangqi, pronounced roughly ''shiang-chee'' in Mandarin [[note]]Or something like "jeung-kei" in Cantonese, which is the common language of quite a few Chinatowns.[[/note]], and known in English as "Chinese Chess". The disk-shaped pieces[[note]]The checker-like shape of xiangqi pieces leads to people occasionally confusing xiangqi and the very, very different Chinese checkers, which is played with marbles.marbles and was invented in the American Midwest in the 19th century and is in fact not Chinese at all.[[/note]] are placed on the vertices rather than in the squares. The board has ten ranks and nine files. Between the fifth and sixth files is a feature called the river. A 3x3 square in the middle back of each player's side is referred to as the palace. [[note]]There is also a Western-style board using Staunton-like pieces called the Cambaluc (after an old Mongol name for Beijing). It was only produced by one company and is fairly rare.[[/note]]

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