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* UnintentionallyUnwinnable: If you make a mistake early in the game without any way of knowing that it was the wrong thing to do, you can keep yourself from winning. The only reason why this is not "by design" is due to the randomness of the draw.



* UnwinnableByMistake: If you make a mistake early in the game without any way of knowing that it was the wrong thing to do, you can keep yourself from winning. The only reason why this is not "by design" is due to the randomness of the draw.


* DummiedOut: In the XP version, text reveals that using .bmp files for backgrounds was possible. This got added in Windows 8's Solitaire Collection, and you can also add effects, card styles, and card images.

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[[caption-width-right:350:A game of Microsoft Solitaire being played on [[UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows Windows XP]]]]


Solitaire is a family of card games played with the standard 52-card deck (with some variants having two or more decks shuffled together) that are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin designed to be played by a single player]]. By far the most recognizable variants of these are "Klondike" solitaire (which most players simply call "solitaire") and "TabletopGame/{{Freecell}}", due to their bundling with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows operating systems starting with version 3.0 in 1990.

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Solitaire is a family of card games played with the standard 52-card deck (with some variants having two or more decks shuffled together) that are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin designed to be played by a single player]]. Special miniature decks have been made for this purpose to save room on smaller tables, but the popularity of computer solitaire has caused them to be somewhat hard to come by; modern smartphones allow layouts to be even smaller. By far the most recognizable variants of these are "Klondike" solitaire (which most players simply call "solitaire") and "TabletopGame/{{Freecell}}", due to their bundling with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows operating systems starting with version 3.0 in 1990.


Solitaire is a family of card games played with the standard 52-card deck (with some variants having two or more decks shuffled together) that are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin designed to be played by a single player]]. By far the most recognizable variants of these are "Klondike" solitaire (which most players simply call "solitaire") and "TabletopGame/{{Freecell}}", due to their bundling with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows operating systems.

to:

Solitaire is a family of card games played with the standard 52-card deck (with some variants having two or more decks shuffled together) that are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin designed to be played by a single player]]. By far the most recognizable variants of these are "Klondike" solitaire (which most players simply call "solitaire") and "TabletopGame/{{Freecell}}", due to their bundling with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows operating systems.
systems starting with version 3.0 in 1990.


Solitaire is a family of card games played with the standard 52-card deck that are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin designed to be played by a single player]]. By far the most recognizable variants of these are "Klondike" solitaire (which most players simply call "solitaire") and "TabletopGame/{{Freecell}}", due to their bundling with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows operating systems.

to:

Solitaire is a family of card games played with the standard 52-card deck (with some variants having two or more decks shuffled together) that are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin designed to be played by a single player]]. By far the most recognizable variants of these are "Klondike" solitaire (which most players simply call "solitaire") and "TabletopGame/{{Freecell}}", due to their bundling with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows operating systems.


%%* TutorialLevel: to pointing, clicking, and dragging in Microsoft Windows.

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%%* * TutorialLevel: to pointing, clicking, and dragging in Microsoft Windows.officially claimed that the original version for Windows 3.0 was one for training people used to MS-DOS in using the mouse, but it was really just there for fun.


* SoloTabletopGame: The most well known example, though ironically because of the computer version. All one needs is a deck of cards, knowledge of the rules, and themselves to play.

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* SoloTabletopGame: The most well known example, though ironically because of the computer version. All one needs is a at least one deck of cards, knowledge of the rules, and themselves to play.


Solitaire is a type of card game that is designed to be played by a single player. By far the most recognizable variants of these are "Klondike" solitaire (which most players simply call "solitaire") and "TabletopGame/{{Freecell}}", due to their bundling with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows operating systems.

to:

Solitaire is a type family of card game games played with the standard 52-card deck that is are [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin designed to be played by a single player.player]]. By far the most recognizable variants of these are "Klondike" solitaire (which most players simply call "solitaire") and "TabletopGame/{{Freecell}}", due to their bundling with UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows operating systems.

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* ScoringPoints: Windows Solitaire has an option to keep score with two systems:
** Standard: Moving a card from the deck to the table or turning a card on the table over gives 5 points and moving a card from the deck or the table to the foundation at the top gives 10 points. Note that you can score 15 points at once by moving a card from the deck to the table, then to the foundation. Moving a card from the foundation to the table gives a -15 point penalty and going through the deck and starting over gives a -100 point penalty if playing by single draw, but there's no penalty if playing by triple draw. If the game is timed, a time bonus of 700,000 / (seconds to finish) is given at the end if it took more than 30 seconds to finish, otherwise no bonus is given.
** Vegas: The game starts at -$52 and each card moved to the foundation gives $5. The catch here is that you're only allowed to go through the deck once if playing by single draw, or thrice if playing by triple draw. If the option to keep score is enabled, restarting the game costs $52 and the money won or lost in the previous game carries over to the next game; if the option is disabled, restarting the game just puts you back at -$52. Since you're not allowed to go through the deck again and again, most of the deals are unsolvable, but it's often possible to win at least enough money to pay back the initial wager and build a score through several games this way if the "keep score" option is enabled.


* UnwinnableByDesign: In the "Vegas Score" Klondike variation, you bet $52, and reclaim $5 per card in the foundation piles. In that ruleset, the odds are designed in favor of the house, as they should in gambling houses. The good news for the computer version is that the dollars are actually the game's version of [[ScoringPoints points]], so it's not like you'd have to turn over your credit card every time you turn on your computer.



* UnwinnableByDesign: In the "Vegas Score" Klondike variation, you bet $52, and reclaim $5 per card in the foundation piles. In that ruleset, the odds are designed in favor of the house, as they should in gambling houses. The good news for the computer version is that the dollars are actually the game's version of [[ScoringPoints points]], so it's not like you'd have to turn over your credit card every time you turn on your computer.

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* MarketBasedTitle: Outside the United States and Canada [[note]] With the exception of [[UsefulNotes/{{Quebec}} Québec]] [[/note]], these sorts of games are often known as "patience" games. A game bundled with the UsefulNotes/AcornArchimedes, also based on the Klondike variation used in Windows Solitaire, was called !Patience, reflecting the British origin.


* LotusEaterMachine: The Microsoft version is a notorious time-waster in offices, to the point where many IT departments remove the game from their computers. The first video game addiction clinic was created to treat an addiction to the game in the person who founded it.


* UnwinnableByDesign: In the "Vegas Score" Klondike variation, you bet $52, and reclaim $5 per card in the foundation. In that ruleset, the odds are designed in favor of the house, as they should in gambling houses. The good news for the computer version is that the dollars are actually the game's version of [[ScoringPoints points]], so it's not like you'd have to turn over your credit card every time you turn on your computer.

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* UnwinnableByDesign: In the "Vegas Score" Klondike variation, you bet $52, and reclaim $5 per card in the foundation.foundation piles. In that ruleset, the odds are designed in favor of the house, as they should in gambling houses. The good news for the computer version is that the dollars are actually the game's version of [[ScoringPoints points]], so it's not like you'd have to turn over your credit card every time you turn on your computer.

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