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* ''TabletopGame/UrbanShadows'' (2016): An Urban horror game in the same vein as the TabletopGame/WorldOfDarkness.

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* ''TabletopGame/UrbanShadows'' (2016): An Urban horror {{urban|Fantasy}} {{horror}} game in the same vein as the TabletopGame/WorldOfDarkness.
of TabletopGame/TheWorldOfDarkness.


* ''TabletopGame/TheSprawl'' (2016): A classic {{dystopian}} {{Cyberpunk}}.

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* ''TabletopGame/TheSprawl'' (2016): A classic {{dystopian}} {{Cyberpunk}}.{{dystopia}}n {{Cyberpunk}} game.

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* ''TabletopGame/TheSprawl'' (2016): A classic {{dystopian}} {{Cyberpunk}}.


Popularity of the ''AW'' engine led Shannon Appelcline, author of ''Designers & Dragons'', to proclaim it one of the "two great 'generic' RPG systems" produced by the indie RPG movement, the other being ''TabletopGame/{{Fate}}''.

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Popularity of the ''AW'' engine led Shannon Appelcline, author of ''Designers & Dragons'', to proclaim it one of the "two great 'generic' RPG systems" produced by the indie RPG movement, the other being ''TabletopGame/{{Fate}}''. ''TabletopGame/BladesInTheDark'', while not a straight-up ''Apocalypse World'' hack, demonstrates and acknowledges being massively influenced by it, as well.


* ''TabletopGame/UrbanShadows'' (2016): An Urban horror game in the same vein as the TabletopGame/WorldOfDarkness

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* ''TabletopGame/UrbanShadows'' (2016): An Urban horror game in the same vein as the TabletopGame/WorldOfDarkness
TabletopGame/WorldOfDarkness.

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* ''TabletopGame/NightWitches'' (2014): A game about a regiment of Soviet airwomen during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, of all settings.



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* ''TabletopGame/UrbanShadows'' (2016): An Urban horror game in the same vein as the TabletopGame/WorldOfDarkness


A character's ExperienceMeter resets upon filling up, and the player can select a option from a list of improvements, ranging from increasing a basic stat by +1, through learning a new move (from their own or another playbook), to gaining a playbook-specific improvement. After a certain number of basic improvements are obtained, the player can additionally pick from "advanced" improvements, which range from advancing some of their basic moves (see above), to retiring that character (effectively turning them into an NPC protected by PlotArmor), switching to another playbook, or even creating an additional character to play alongside their old one.

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A character's ExperienceMeter resets upon filling up, and the player can select a option from a list of improvements, ranging from increasing a basic stat by +1, through learning a new move (from their own or another playbook), to gaining a playbook-specific improvement. After a certain number of basic improvements are obtained, the player can additionally pick from "advanced" improvements, which range from advancing some of their basic moves (see above), to retiring that character (effectively turning them into an NPC protected by PlotArmor), switching to another playbook, or even creating an additional a new character to play alongside their old one.


Given the system's focus on characters, the rules for their possessions are deliberately open-ended, avoiding the need for catalog-style {{sourcebook}}s. Gameplay-relevant items simply have "tags", i.e. short descriptors of their functions, restrictions, and appearances. For instance, a weapon typically has tags for how much harm it does, its effective range, and how loud or messy it is: a revolver may be tagged as "2-harm close loud", meaning that you can use it at close range to inflict 2 points of harm but everyone will hear you fire. Note how it doesn't say anything about the model, caliber, or {{bling|BlingBang}} of the revolver--those details are left for the player to fill in.

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Given the system's focus on characters, the rules for their possessions are deliberately open-ended, avoiding the need for catalog-style {{sourcebook}}s. Gameplay-relevant items simply have "tags", i.e. short descriptors of their functions, restrictions, and appearances. For instance, a weapon typically has tags for how much harm it does, its effective range, and how loud or messy it is: a revolver may be tagged as "2-harm close loud", meaning that you it can use it at close range to inflict 2 points of harm at close range, but everyone will hear you fire. Note how it doesn't say anything about the model, caliber, or {{bling|BlingBang}} of the revolver--those details are left for the player to fill in.



A character's ExperienceMeter resets upon filling up, and the player can select a option from a list of improvements, ranging from increasing a basic stat by +1, through learning a new move (from their own or another playbook), to gaining a playbook-specific improvement. After a certain number of basic improvements are obtained, the player can additionally pick from "advanced" improvements, which range from advancing some of their basic moves (see above), to retiring that character (effectively turning them into an NPC protected by PlotArmor), switching to a different playbook, or even creating an additional character to play alongside their old one.

to:

A character's ExperienceMeter resets upon filling up, and the player can select a option from a list of improvements, ranging from increasing a basic stat by +1, through learning a new move (from their own or another playbook), to gaining a playbook-specific improvement. After a certain number of basic improvements are obtained, the player can additionally pick from "advanced" improvements, which range from advancing some of their basic moves (see above), to retiring that character (effectively turning them into an NPC protected by PlotArmor), switching to a different another playbook, or even creating an additional character to play alongside their old one.


The cornerstone of the system are "moves". A move is basically any in-game event that interrupts the conversation mentioned above and makes the rules kick in. While it is easy to think of the moves as ability tests that require rolling UsefulNotes/{{dice}} (and they often are), they are more abstract than that. A character owning a particularly CoolCar is a move, for example, as is them being a LivingLieDetector, maxing out their primary stat, etc. The moves are categorized into player moves and GM moves, with the former further subdivided into basic and playbook moves:

to:

The cornerstone of the system are "moves". A move is basically any in-game event that interrupts the conversation mentioned above and makes the rules kick in. While it is easy to think of the moves as ability tests that require rolling UsefulNotes/{{dice}} dice (and they often are), they are more abstract than that. A character owning a particularly CoolCar is a move, for example, as is them being a LivingLieDetector, maxing out their primary stat, etc. The moves are categorized into player moves and GM moves, with the former further subdivided into basic and playbook moves:



Dice-rolling is designed to be as unobtrusive as possible, so there is only one kind of rolls: 2d6 + Stat (abbreviated to "roll +Stat"), meaning that you roll two six-sided dice, sum the results, and add the value of your character's specified stat to it. If the end result is 6 or lower, it's a miss: something bad happens; on a 7 to 9, it's a weak hit: you still succeed, but either just barely, at a [[PyrrhicVictory heavy price]], or must face a SadisticChoice; on a 10+, you succeed and everything is peachy. Finally, on a 12+, something exceptionally good happens, but only if you're using a basic move that you have "advanced" earlier (see below). The probability distribution curve of 2d6 rolls makes even small modifiers significant, while the fact that every result changes the situation for better or worse prevents the narration from bogging down.

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Dice-rolling UsefulNotes/{{Dice}}-rolling is designed to be as unobtrusive as possible, so there is only one kind of rolls: 2d6 + Stat (abbreviated to "roll +Stat"), meaning that you roll two six-sided dice, sum the results, and add the value of your character's specified stat to it. If the end result is 6 or lower, it's a miss: something bad happens; on a 7 to 9, it's a weak hit: you still succeed, but either just barely, at a [[PyrrhicVictory heavy price]], or must face a SadisticChoice; on a 10+, you succeed and everything is peachy. Finally, on a 12+, something exceptionally good happens, but only if you're using a basic move that you have "advanced" earlier (see below). The probability distribution curve of 2d6 rolls makes even small modifiers significant, while the fact that every result changes the situation for better or worse prevents the narration from bogging down.


Like most {{Tabletop RPG}}s, the gameplay is a conversation between the players, one of whom serves as the GameMaster (called "Master of Ceremonies" or "MC" in the original ''AW'' and a [[CallAHitPointASmeerp dozen other terms]] in the hacks). The players generally control a single PlayerCharacter each (although it's perfectly legal to play more than one at once), while the GM controls the world and the [[NonPlayerCharacter NPCs]] in it. Crucially, there is no GMFiat: instead of being the sole source of truth about the setting and the plot, the GM facilitates dramatic conflicts and struggles for the [=PCs=] to resolve (plays "the Fifth Business", in Edwards' terms), while the creative freedom and responsibility to shape the plot and the game world is shared equally among all players.

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Like most {{Tabletop RPG}}s, the gameplay is a conversation between the players, one of whom serves as the GameMaster (called "Master of Ceremonies" or "MC" in the original ''AW'' and a [[CallAHitPointASmeerp dozen other terms]] in the hacks). The players generally control a single PlayerCharacter each (although it's perfectly legal to play more than one at once), while the GM controls the world and the [[NonPlayerCharacter NPCs]] in it. Crucially, there GMFiat is no GMFiat: not absolute: instead of being the sole source of truth about the setting plot and the plot, setting, the GM facilitates dramatic conflicts and struggles for the [=PCs=] to resolve (plays "the Fifth Business", in Edwards' terms), while the creative freedom and responsibility to shape the plot story and the game world is shared equally among all players.



There is only one kind of dice rolls: 2d6 + Stat (abbreviated to "roll +Stat"), meaning that you roll two six-sided dice, sum the results, and add the value of your character's specified stat to it. If the end result is 6 or lower, it's a miss: something bad happens; on a 7 to 9, it's a weak hit: you still succeed, but either just barely, at a [[PyrrhicVictory heavy price]], or must face a SadisticChoice; on a 10+, you succeed and everything is peachy. Finally, on a 12+, something exceptionally good happens, but only if you're using a basic move that you have "advanced" earlier (see below). The probability distribution curve of 2d6 rolls makes even small modifiers significant, while the fact that every result changes the situation for better or worse prevents the narration from bogging down.

to:

There Dice-rolling is designed to be as unobtrusive as possible, so there is only one kind of dice rolls: 2d6 + Stat (abbreviated to "roll +Stat"), meaning that you roll two six-sided dice, sum the results, and add the value of your character's specified stat to it. If the end result is 6 or lower, it's a miss: something bad happens; on a 7 to 9, it's a weak hit: you still succeed, but either just barely, at a [[PyrrhicVictory heavy price]], or must face a SadisticChoice; on a 10+, you succeed and everything is peachy. Finally, on a 12+, something exceptionally good happens, but only if you're using a basic move that you have "advanced" earlier (see below). The probability distribution curve of 2d6 rolls makes even small modifiers significant, while the fact that every result changes the situation for better or worse prevents the narration from bogging down.

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Popularity of the ''AW'' engine led Shannon Appelcline, author of ''Designers & Dragons'', to proclaim it one of the "two great 'generic' RPG systems" produced by the indie RPG movement, the other being ''TabletopGame/{{Fate}}''.


The cornerstone of the system are "moves". A move is basically any in-game event that interrupts the conversation mentioned above and makes the rules kick in. While it is easy to think of the moves as ability tests that require rolling dice (and they often are), they are more abstract than that. A character owning a particularly CoolCar is a move, for example, as is them being a LivingLieDetector, maxing out their primary stat, etc. The moves are categorized into player moves and GM moves, with the former further subdivided into basic and playbook moves:

to:

The cornerstone of the system are "moves". A move is basically any in-game event that interrupts the conversation mentioned above and makes the rules kick in. While it is easy to think of the moves as ability tests that require rolling dice UsefulNotes/{{dice}} (and they often are), they are more abstract than that. A character owning a particularly CoolCar is a move, for example, as is them being a LivingLieDetector, maxing out their primary stat, etc. The moves are categorized into player moves and GM moves, with the former further subdivided into basic and playbook moves:

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