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* {{Defictionalization}}: The game started as a legally safe parody of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' in ''ComicStrip/KnightsOfTheDinnerTable'', and was then turned into a ''real'' role-playing game.



* ThatOneRule: A bunch of "one rules" from ''Knights of the Dinner Table'' are in effect in ''Hackmaster''. The most notable of them is that sewing needles appear on the weapons chart and do 0.125 damage, just as in a "Knights" strip.


[[quoteright:224:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/RPG_hackmaster_cover_5080.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:224:Does the statue in the background look familiar? [[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons It should.]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:224:Does the statue in the background look familiar? [[TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons It should.]]]]
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[[caption-width-right:350:The ''Hackmaster'' logo.]]


* DwindlingParty: There was a visual version of this with the ''Hacklopedia of Beasts'' Volumes 1-8. Volume 1's cover showed an eight person adventuring group, with one of the adventurers being killed by a monster. Volume 2's cover showed the remaining seven characters, again with one of them being killed. The pattern continued until Volume 8, which showed the last living party member being killed by the zombies of the first seven adventurers.

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* DwindlingParty: There was a visual version of this with the ''Hacklopedia of Beasts'' Volumes 1-8. Volume 1's cover showed an eight person adventuring group, with one of the adventurers being killed by a monster. Volume 2's cover showed the remaining seven characters, again with one of them being killed. The pattern continued until Volume 8, which showed the last living party member member, their hireling the torch-bearer, being killed chased out of a dungeon by the zombies of the first seven adventurers.


* IntrinsicVow: 4th Edition ''Player's Handbook''. The spell Charm of Undying Devotion allows the caster to control the target's actions. If the caster gives an order that is against the target's nature, the target receives a new saving throw with a bonus of +1 to +4. If the saving throw succeeds the spell is neutralized.

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* IntrinsicVow: 4th Edition ''Player's Handbook''. The spell Charm of Undying Devotion allows the caster to control the target's actions. If the caster gives an order that is against the target's nature, the target receives a new saving throw with a bonus of +1 to +4. If the saving throw succeeds succeeds, the spell is neutralized.

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* DwindlingParty: There was a visual version of this with the ''Hacklopedia of Beasts'' Volumes 1-8. Volume 1's cover showed an eight person adventuring group, with one of the adventurers being killed by a monster. Volume 2's cover showed the remaining seven characters, again with one of them being killed. The pattern continued until Volume 8, which showed the last living party member being killed by the zombies of the first seven adventurers.


The first actual edition of ''Hackmaster'' was published in 2001 [[UnInstallment as the fourth edition of the game]], with the "Garweeze Wurld" from the "Knights" strips as its standard setting. In 2007, Kenzer's agreement with Wizards of the Coast expired, preventing them from using any copyrighted material from ''AD&D'' in ''Hackmaster''. The game soon switched over to ''Hackmaster Basic'', which contains all original material, and the original rulebooks for ''Hackmaster'' are out of print. Now called ''HackMaster 5th Edition'', it features much of the same silliness as the previous edition, but is [[IndecisiveParody now more of a straightforward old-school RPG than a parody]].

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The first actual edition of ''Hackmaster'' was published in 2001 [[UnInstallment as the fourth edition of the game]], with the "Garweeze Wurld" from the "Knights" strips as its standard setting. In 2007, Kenzer's agreement with Wizards of the Coast expired, preventing them from using any copyrighted material from ''AD&D'' in ''Hackmaster''. The game soon switched over to ''Hackmaster Basic'', which contains all original material, and the original rulebooks for ''Hackmaster'' are out of print. Now called ''HackMaster ''Hackmaster 5th Edition'', it features much of the same silliness as the previous edition, but is [[IndecisiveParody now more of a straightforward old-school RPG than a parody]].

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* AlwaysChaoticEvil: The idea that non "demihuman" races are universally evil monsters is strictly embraced in both 4th and 5th edition; orcs in particular are such barbaric, savage monsters that even hobgoblins look down on them.


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* DarkerAndEdgier: Both "Garweeze Wurld" for 4th edition and the 5th edition rendition of [[TabletopGame/KingdomsOfKalamar Tellene]] are ''much'' grittier and more focused on BlackAndGrayMorality than your standard HeroicFantasy D&D world. The best way to describe them as if Gary Gygax thought that ''TabletopGame/{{Greyhawk}}'' needed a doubled dosage of TheDungAges.


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* ShoutOut: The 4th edition Hacklopedia of Beasts volume 3 features the "Fairy, Carnivorous" entry, which is a reference to Kenzer & Co's cannibal fairy wargame ''TabletopGame/FairyMeat''. It even uses the game's terminology of having the magic-focused "Glitter Fairy" and the standard carnivorous fairy progressing through ranks of toughness entitled "Wild, Seasoned, Hunter and Hardcore".

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* {{Defictionalization}}: The game started as a legally safe parody of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' in ''ComicStrip/KnightsOfTheDinnerTable'', and was then turned into a ''real'' role-playing game.


* AffectionateParody: If you played first or second edition AD&D, ''Hackmaster'' is one part nostalgia trip to one part reminding you that you were crazy to play a game that was this unnecessarily complicated.

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* AffectionateParody: If you played first or second edition AD&D, ''Hackmaster'' is one part nostalgia trip to one part reminding you that you were crazy to play a game that was this unnecessarily complicated. Verges on IndecisiveParody with the newest edition, where many of the rules are streamlined.


The first actual edition of ''Hackmaster'' was published in 2001 [[UnInstallment as the fourth edition of the game]], with the "Garweeze Wurld" from the "Knights" strips as its standard setting. In 2007, Kenzer's agreement with Wizards of the Coast expired, preventing them from using any copyrighted material from ''AD&D'' in ''Hackmaster''. The game soon switched over to ''Hackmaster Basic'', which contains all original material, and the original rulebooks for ''Hackmaster'' are out of print.

to:

The first actual edition of ''Hackmaster'' was published in 2001 [[UnInstallment as the fourth edition of the game]], with the "Garweeze Wurld" from the "Knights" strips as its standard setting. In 2007, Kenzer's agreement with Wizards of the Coast expired, preventing them from using any copyrighted material from ''AD&D'' in ''Hackmaster''. The game soon switched over to ''Hackmaster Basic'', which contains all original material, and the original rulebooks for ''Hackmaster'' are out of print.
print. Now called ''HackMaster 5th Edition'', it features much of the same silliness as the previous edition, but is [[IndecisiveParody now more of a straightforward old-school RPG than a parody]].

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As the "fourth edition" of ''Hackmaster'' is literally a reskin of first and second edition ''TableTopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', there's a lot of "trope overlap" between the games and many of the go-to, long-running ''D&D'' tropes apply just as well here. The following is for tropes that are specific to ''Hackmaster''.

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* IntrinsicVow: 4th Edition ''Player's Handbook''. The spell Charm of Undying Devotion allows the caster to control the target's actions. If the caster gives an order that is against the target's nature, the target receives a new saving throw with a bonus of +1 to +4. If the saving throw succeeds the spell is neutralized.


This is the game played by most of the characters in ''ComicStrip/KnightsOfTheDinnerTable'', which is a sort of [[AffectionateParody barely-veiled parody]] of ''DungeonsAndDragons''. A few years into the magazine's life, its publisher Kenzer began to branch out into making games of its own, and licensed the rights to the first two editions of ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'' in order to make a real version of ''Hackmaster''.

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This is the game played by most of the characters in ''ComicStrip/KnightsOfTheDinnerTable'', which is a sort of [[AffectionateParody barely-veiled parody]] of ''DungeonsAndDragons''.''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. A few years into the magazine's life, its publisher Kenzer began to branch out into making games of its own, and licensed the rights to the first two editions of ''Advanced Dungeons & Dragons'' in order to make a real version of ''Hackmaster''.

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* WeakenedByTheLight: 4th Edition's drow (AlwaysChaoticEvil elves) were based on 1st and 2nd Edition Advanced ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', but there was a difference: instead of multiple specific penalties, drow get a simple -1 penalty to all rolls in bright light (bright daylight and Light/Continual Light spells).

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* RedEyesTakeWarning: 4th Edition ''Player's Handbook''. In the description of the almost AlwaysChaoticEvil drow it says that their eyes glow a feral red - evidence of the hatred that burns in their hearts and minds.

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