Follow TV Tropes

Following

History SpiritualAntithesis / ComicBooks

Go To



* ComicBook/AnimalMan has ComicBook/{{Deadpool}}. Both were obscure characters that got [[MyRealDaddy daddies]] that retooled them to very powerful street heroes trying to be recognized by bigger teams and BreakingTheFourthWall, but other than that they take completely different directions. Animal Man is a NiceGuy family man and animal rights activist with very few close friends in the superhero community, while Deadpool is a lonely JerkWithAHeartOfGold mercenary with many VitriolicBestBuds in the superhero community. Animal Man is a vegetarian, while Deadpool is practically a carnivore. Animal Man barely uses his very minimal HealingFactor, while Deadpool gets by with his extremely rapid healing factor. Animal Man is a product of UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks whose most famous run went on to harshly criticize UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, While Deadpool is a product of The Dark Age that went on to lightly criticize the worst aspects of UsefulNotes/TheModernAgeOfComicBooks. Animal Man played breaking the fourth wall very seriously and would always forget when he did because he can't truly see it, while Deadpool plays breaking the fourth wall for comedy and always has that ability. After Grant Morrison's run, Animal Man went on to more horror, sci-fi and mysticism based stories, while Deadpool still stayed in comedy-based mercenary stories. Animal Man isn't in many big stories while Deadpool has WolverinePublicity.
* Not uncommon for ComicBook/{{Batman}}:
** One can make the argument that ComicBook/SpiderMan is this to him. Both are orphaned, urban-based {{Animal Themed|SuperBeing}} superheroes who have a RoguesGallery of gimmick-based villains, chief among them being AxCrazy, LaughingMad [[SecondaryColorNemesis villains who wear green and purple]] (ComicBook/TheJoker for Bats, ComicBook/GreenGoblin for Spidey). They both also have been [[DatingCatwoman romantically involved with a female villain]] who emphasizes the cat part of cat burglar, ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} for Batman and ComicBook/BlackCat for Spider-Man. However, here is where their premises diverge: Both heroes have the loss of a loved one at the hands of a criminal motivating their actions, but while Batman lost his parents when he was a child, which is what drove him to become a crime-fighter, Spider-Man lost his Uncle Ben when he was just using his powers to make money, [[ILetGwenStacyDie and is something he inadvertently enabled]], [[ComesGreatResponsibility which drove him to use his powers to help people]]. In addition, Batman [[BadassNormal lacks any real superpowers]], [[CharlesAtlasSuperpower instead training his body and mind to their peek]] and bolstering that with gadgetry, [[CrazyPrepared preparations]], and [[BatmanGambit ingenuity]], while Spider-Man has superhuman abilities [[ILoveNuclearPower granted from a radioactive spider bite]], primarily using [[AllWebbedUp one highly reliable gadget]]. In addition, Batman's civilian identity is Bruce Wayne, [[CrimefightingWithCash a billionaire]] [[RichIdiotWithNoDayJob businessman]], while Spider-Man's identity as Peter Parker is commonly depicted as [[WorkingClassHero struggling to]] [[PerpetualPoverty make ends meet]]. Furthermore, Batman's default disposition towards his exploits is being TheStoic TerrorHero, while Spider-Man copes with his adventures by [[YouFightLikeACow making wry jokes at his enemies]]. Whereas Batman [[DarkIsNotEvil dresses primarily in grey, black, and dark blue]], Spider-Man's costume is [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue]]. Furthermore, Batman frequently adopts {{Kid Sidekick}}s such as ComicBook/{{Robin}} and ComicBook/{{Batgirl}}, while Spider-Man started out as a teenager himself, in large part to prove that teen superheroes can work. Finally, Batman operates in Gotham City, a fictional city [[DependingOnTheWriter which has sometimes been interpreted as]] [[NoCommunitiesWereHarmed a stand-in for]] UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, while Spider-Man is explicitly centered in the BigApplesauce.
*** Following this vein of logic, compare and contrast Batman and Spider-Man's respective [[{{Archenemy}} Archenemies]], ComicBook/TheJoker and ComicBook/NormanOsborn. Aside from their aforementioned similar purple and green color schemes and propensity for insanity, both frequently harm the hero's loved ones, often times ForTheEvulz (The Joker [[ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily killing Jason Todd]] and [[ComicBook/TheKillingJoke crippling Barbara Gordon]], The Green Goblin [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied killing Gwen Stacy]]). In addition, both of their origin stories involve exposure to dangerous chemicals (the Joker falling into a vat of chemicals, the Green Goblin being exposed to an PsychoSerum of his own creation). But here's the fluke: Whereas the Joker's true name and life ''before'' his accident has been [[ThatManIsDead lost to history]], with [[MultipleChoicePast various theories being postulated]], the Green Goblin has had a consistent secret identity - Norman Osborn, a corrupt industrialist[[note]]Interestingly, Osborn's Green Goblin persona was derived from the monster from his childhood nightmares. [[Franchise/{{Batman}} Sound familiar]]? [[/note]]. In addition, the Joker persona has consumed the man before the accident, while Osborn and the Goblin [[JekyllAndHyde are portrayed as two different personalities]], often times at conflict with each other. There's also an inversion in status befitting of the heroes -- The Joker is a crimelord who doesn't have [[VillainousUnderdog nearly as many resources as Batman]] and gets by through his wits and insanity, while Osborn is a multi-millionaire industrialist with vast resources and connections, making him an overdog to the working-class Spider-Man. Furthermore, DC has traditionally left it ambiguous on whether the Joker knows Batman's identity, while Marvel has made it clear that the Goblin knows that Peter Parker is Spider-Man.
** Another Marvel antithesis to ComicBook/{{Batman}} is ComicBook/IronMan. Both are billionaire playboys with [[BadassNormal no inherent superpowers]] that lost their parents to tragedy, and both are founding members and prominent figures of their universe's main SuperTeam (the ComicBook/JusticeLeague for Batman, ComicBook/TheAvengers for Iron Man). That said, they heavily diverge from there. Batman primarily relies on fancy gadgets in addition to various vehicles and tools, but relies on his own agility over brute force. Iron Man wears PoweredArmor that does much of the fighting in conjunction with him, and rarely is he without it. Batman has a SecretIdentity that he fights to maintain and keep from the public, while Iron Man is completely public and a renown celebrity. Batman adheres almost religiously to ThouShaltNotKill, whereas Iron Man not only freely kills but TheresNoKillLikeOverkill is his ''preferred'' method. Batman [[TheTeetotaler abstains from alcohol and addictive material]], while Iron Man [[TheAlcoholic famously struggles with alcoholism]]. Batman's RoguesGallery consists of various criminals and lawless individuals, Iron Man's rogues are more comparable what an industrial billionaire would have. Batman famously [[DarkIsNotEvil wears a black and grey suit]], while Iron Man [[PrimaryColorChampion wears red and gold armor]]. Finally, Batman considers Bruce Wayne to be his alter ego and Batman to be his ''true'' self, while Iron Man and Tony Stark are one and the same.

to:

* ComicBook/AnimalMan has ComicBook/{{Deadpool}}. Both were obscure characters that got [[MyRealDaddy daddies]] that retooled them to very powerful street heroes trying to be recognized by bigger teams and BreakingTheFourthWall, but other than that they take completely different directions. Animal Man is a NiceGuy family man and animal rights activist with very few close friends in the superhero community, while Deadpool is a lonely JerkWithAHeartOfGold mercenary with many VitriolicBestBuds in the superhero community. Animal Man is a vegetarian, while Deadpool is practically a carnivore. Animal Man barely uses his very minimal HealingFactor, while Deadpool gets by with his extremely rapid healing factor. Animal Man is a product of UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks whose most famous run went on to harshly criticize UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks, While while Deadpool is a product of The Dark Age that went on to lightly criticize the worst aspects of UsefulNotes/TheModernAgeOfComicBooks. Animal Man played breaking the fourth wall very seriously and would always forget when he did because he can't truly see it, while Deadpool plays breaking the fourth wall for comedy and always has that ability. After Grant Morrison's Creator/GrantMorrison's run, Animal Man went on to more horror, sci-fi and mysticism based stories, while Deadpool still stayed in comedy-based mercenary stories. Animal Man isn't in many big stories while Deadpool has WolverinePublicity.
* Not uncommon for ComicBook/{{Batman}}:
Franchise/{{Batman}}:
** One can make the argument that ComicBook/SpiderMan Franchise/SpiderMan is this to him. Both are orphaned, urban-based {{Animal Themed|SuperBeing}} superheroes who have a RoguesGallery of gimmick-based villains, chief among them being AxCrazy, LaughingMad [[SecondaryColorNemesis villains who wear green and purple]] (ComicBook/TheJoker for Bats, ComicBook/GreenGoblin for Spidey). They both also have been [[DatingCatwoman romantically involved with a female villain]] who emphasizes the cat part of cat burglar, ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} for Batman and ComicBook/BlackCat for Spider-Man. However, here is where their premises diverge: Both heroes have the loss of a loved one at the hands of a criminal motivating their actions, but while Batman lost his parents when he was a child, which is what drove him to become a crime-fighter, Spider-Man lost his Uncle Ben when he was just using his powers to make money, [[ILetGwenStacyDie and is something he inadvertently enabled]], [[ComesGreatResponsibility which drove him to use his powers to help people]]. In addition, Batman [[BadassNormal lacks any real superpowers]], [[CharlesAtlasSuperpower instead training his body and mind to their peek]] and bolstering that with gadgetry, [[CrazyPrepared preparations]], and [[BatmanGambit ingenuity]], while Spider-Man has superhuman abilities [[ILoveNuclearPower granted from a radioactive spider bite]], primarily using [[AllWebbedUp one highly reliable gadget]]. In addition, Batman's civilian identity is Bruce Wayne, [[CrimefightingWithCash a billionaire]] [[RichIdiotWithNoDayJob businessman]], while Spider-Man's identity as Peter Parker is commonly depicted as [[WorkingClassHero struggling to]] [[PerpetualPoverty make ends meet]]. Furthermore, Batman's default disposition towards his exploits is being TheStoic TerrorHero, while Spider-Man copes with his adventures by [[YouFightLikeACow making wry jokes at his enemies]]. Whereas Batman [[DarkIsNotEvil dresses primarily in grey, black, and dark blue]], Spider-Man's costume is [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue]]. Furthermore, Batman frequently adopts {{Kid Sidekick}}s such as ComicBook/{{Robin}} and ComicBook/{{Batgirl}}, while Spider-Man started out as a teenager himself, in large part to prove that teen superheroes can work. Finally, Batman operates in Gotham City, a fictional city [[DependingOnTheWriter which has sometimes been interpreted as]] [[NoCommunitiesWereHarmed a stand-in for]] UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, while Spider-Man is explicitly centered in the BigApplesauce.
*** Following this vein of logic, compare and contrast Batman and Spider-Man's respective [[{{Archenemy}} Archenemies]], ComicBook/TheJoker and ComicBook/NormanOsborn. Aside from their aforementioned similar purple and green color schemes and propensity for insanity, both frequently harm the hero's loved ones, often times ForTheEvulz (The Joker [[ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily killing Jason Todd]] and [[ComicBook/TheKillingJoke crippling Barbara Gordon]], The Green Goblin [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied killing Gwen Stacy]]). In addition, both of their origin stories involve exposure to dangerous chemicals (the Joker falling into a vat of chemicals, the Green Goblin being exposed to an a PsychoSerum of his own creation). But here's the fluke: Whereas the Joker's true name and life ''before'' his accident has been [[ThatManIsDead lost to history]], with [[MultipleChoicePast various theories being postulated]], the Green Goblin has had a consistent secret identity - Norman Osborn, a corrupt industrialist[[note]]Interestingly, Osborn's Green Goblin persona was derived from the monster from his childhood nightmares. [[Franchise/{{Batman}} Sound familiar]]? [[/note]]. In addition, the Joker persona has consumed the man before the accident, while Osborn and the Goblin [[JekyllAndHyde are portrayed as two different personalities]], often times at conflict with each other. There's also an inversion in status befitting of the heroes -- The Joker is a crimelord who doesn't have [[VillainousUnderdog nearly as many resources as Batman]] and gets by through his wits and insanity, while Osborn is a multi-millionaire industrialist with vast resources and connections, making him an overdog to the working-class Spider-Man. Furthermore, DC has traditionally left it ambiguous on whether the Joker knows Batman's identity, while Marvel has made it clear that the Goblin knows that Peter Parker is Spider-Man.
** Another Marvel antithesis to ComicBook/{{Batman}} Batman is ComicBook/IronMan. Both are billionaire playboys with [[BadassNormal no inherent superpowers]] that lost their parents to tragedy, and both are founding members and prominent figures of their universe's main SuperTeam (the ComicBook/JusticeLeague Franchise/{{Justice League|OfAmerica}} for Batman, ComicBook/TheAvengers for Iron Man). That said, they heavily diverge from there. Batman primarily relies on fancy gadgets in addition to various vehicles and tools, but relies on his own agility over brute force. Iron Man wears PoweredArmor that does much of the fighting in conjunction with him, and rarely is he without it. Batman has a SecretIdentity that he fights to maintain and keep from the public, while Iron Man is completely public and a renown celebrity. Batman adheres almost religiously to ThouShaltNotKill, whereas Iron Man not only freely kills but TheresNoKillLikeOverkill ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill is his ''preferred'' method. Batman [[TheTeetotaler abstains from alcohol and addictive material]], while Iron Man [[TheAlcoholic famously struggles with alcoholism]]. Batman's RoguesGallery consists of various criminals and lawless individuals, Iron Man's rogues are more comparable to what an industrial billionaire would have. Batman famously [[DarkIsNotEvil wears a black and grey suit]], while Iron Man [[PrimaryColorChampion wears red and gold armor]]. Finally, Batman considers Bruce Wayne to be his alter ego and Batman to be his ''true'' self, while Iron Man and Tony Stark are one and the same.



* ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' villain Superboy Prime has one in the titular protagonist of ''ComicBook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool''. Both share origin stories of being teenage fans of superhero comics from our world who [[AscendedFanboy enters their favorite Universe and gets superpowers]], only to be disappointed that things do not work out as they imagined. The difference lies on how they react and what kinds of fans they represent. Prime represents lifelong fans who become bitter with how much the Franchise/DCUniverse has changed. He wants to brutally force it back to the way it once was and as he goes along, he stops caring how many he kills since he doesn't consider them real anyway. On the other hand, Gwen represents news fans who are aware of the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's mamy problems and love the franchise despite them. While she starts thinking she can do whatever she wants since none of it is real, she is quickly humbled and comes to care for others like real people. Prime embraces villainy as a alternative of being forgotten, while a FaceHeelTurn is the only things that terrifies Gwen more than ComicBookLimbo. Finally, Prime was a huge fan of Superman before coming to hate him, while Gwen named herself after Deadpool JustForPun and doesn't event read his comics.

to:

* ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' villain Superboy Prime has one in the titular protagonist of ''ComicBook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool''. Both share origin stories of being teenage fans of superhero comics from our world who [[AscendedFanboy enters their favorite Universe and gets superpowers]], only to be disappointed that things do not work out as they imagined. The difference lies on how they react and what kinds of fans they represent. Prime represents lifelong fans who become bitter with how much the Franchise/DCUniverse Franchise/TheDCU has changed. He wants to brutally force it back to the way it once was and as he goes along, he stops caring how many he kills since he doesn't consider them real anyway. On the other hand, Gwen represents news fans who are aware of the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's mamy many problems and love the franchise despite them. While she starts thinking she can do whatever she wants since none of it is real, she is quickly humbled and comes to care for others like real people. Prime embraces villainy as a alternative of being forgotten, while a FaceHeelTurn is the only things that terrifies Gwen more than ComicBookLimbo. Finally, Prime was a huge fan of Superman before coming to hate him, while Gwen named herself after Deadpool JustForPun and doesn't event read his comics.



* ComicBook/{{Superman}}, of course, had his share of these over the years in various shapes and forms, [[SupermanSubstitute some more obvious than the others.]]

to:

* ComicBook/{{Superman}}, Franchise/{{Superman}}, of course, had his share of these over the years in various shapes and forms, [[SupermanSubstitute some more obvious than the others.]]



** Another [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] antithesis to Superman is ComicBook/CaptainAmerica. Both are [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue-wearing]] superheroes with [[TheCape idealistic]] [[{{Eagleland}} attitudes of America]] who grew up in poverty and grew up to serve as the traditional {{Big Good}}s of their respective universes. In addition, both heroes' {{ArchEnemies}} are [[BaldOfEvil bald villains]] who seek to TakeOverTheWorld (ComicBook/LexLuthor for Supes, The ComicBook/RedSkull for Cap). However, one interesting contrast is how they embody opposite sides of the NatureVersusNurture debate: whereas Superman is an extraterrestrial whose abilities were innate and manifested themselves when he arrived on Earth (i.e., Nature), Captain America was born an ordinary human who, as an adult, was given a SuperSerum by the U.S. military that enhanced his peak abilities (i.e., Nurture). In addition, Superman has traditionally no need for physical weapons, instead using his aforementioned Kryptonian powers, while Captain America's WeaponOfChoice is his [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe trademark shield]]. While Superman is an alien who often feels alone on Earth as the LastOfHisKind, Captain America sometimes feels out of his time, being a World War II veteran in modern society. Superman's {{Archenemy}} ComicBook/LexLuthor is often portrayed as an American capitalist who uses his [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney wealth]] and [[VillainWithGoodPublicity influence]], while Captain America's {{Archenemy}} the ComicBook/RedSkull is a literal Nazi reviled by [[EvenEvilHasStandards all but like-minded individuals]].
** Superman and the ComicBook/FantasticFour are polar opposites in almost every way. Superman is traditionally portrayed as a borderline-demigod with a vast array of powerful abilities, but he has to cope with the inherent heartbreak of being [[TheLastOfHisKind the last member of a dying alien race]]; as such, [[IWorkAlone he typically fights alone]] when he's not with the ComicBook/JusticeLeague, and he lost most of his family when he was too young to remember them. He's also famous for [[ClarkKenting keeping his secret identity so well-hidden]] that not even his love interest and his nemesis know who he really is. In contrast, the ComicBook/FantasticFour have worked as a group since the beginning, they each have one specific superpower, they're a lovably {{dysfunctional family}} in addition to a superhero team, and they don't have secret identities at all; in fact, they're all world-renowned celebrities. Interestingly, their origin stories are also mirror images of one another: Superman's story begins with him crashing to Earth in a rocket ship and getting superpowers from Earth's sun, while the Four's story begins with them flying into space in a rocket ship and getting superpowers from cosmic radiation.
** Superman and ComicBook/SpiderMan are both iconic urban superheroes known for their distinctive [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue costumes]], and for wearing glasses and working at newspapers in their civilian identities; both of them also have [[CorruptCorporateExecutive evil corporate CEOs]] as their archenemies. But Superman is known for his raw strength and his brawny physique, and he's often thematically associated with the heavens due to his [[FlyingBrick flight powers]] and [[HumanAlien alien heritage]]. Spider-Man, on the other hand, is known for his agility and his wiry physique, and most depictions emphasize his closeness to the Earth due to his [[WorkingClassHero humble background]] and [[AnimalThemedSuperBeing insect motif]]. The Daily Planet is also traditionally portrayed sympathetically, with its reporters being crusading idealists driven to protect the truth, while the Daily Bugle is cast in a more morally ambiguous light, with J. Jonah Jameson's editorials [[HeroWithBadPublicity ruining Spidey's reputation]]. Superman's nemesis ComicBook/LexLuthor is also typically portrayed as a humanist scientific genius [[BadassNormal who can hold his own against superheroes with nothing but wits and gadgetry]]; by contrast, Spider-Man's nemesis ComicBook/NormanOsborn is usually portrayed as just a shrewd businessman who attempts to use science to transcend his human limitations, and ends up adopting a monstrous alter ego cloaked in supernatural trappings.

to:

** Another [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] antithesis to Superman is ComicBook/CaptainAmerica. Both are [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue-wearing]] superheroes with [[TheCape idealistic]] [[{{Eagleland}} attitudes of America]] who grew up in poverty and grew up to serve as the traditional {{Big Good}}s of their respective universes. In addition, both heroes' {{ArchEnemies}} are [[BaldOfEvil bald villains]] who seek to TakeOverTheWorld (ComicBook/LexLuthor for Supes, The ComicBook/RedSkull for Cap). However, one interesting contrast is how they embody opposite sides of the NatureVersusNurture debate: whereas Superman is an extraterrestrial whose abilities were innate and manifested themselves when he arrived on Earth (i.e., Nature), Captain America was born an ordinary human who, as an adult, was given a SuperSerum by the U.S. military that enhanced his peak abilities (i.e., Nurture). In addition, Superman has traditionally no need for physical weapons, instead using his aforementioned Kryptonian powers, while Captain America's WeaponOfChoice is his [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe trademark shield]]. While Superman is an alien who often feels alone on Earth as the LastOfHisKind, Captain America sometimes feels out of his time, being a World War II veteran in modern society. Superman's {{Archenemy}} ComicBook/LexLuthor is often portrayed as an American capitalist who uses his [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney wealth]] and [[VillainWithGoodPublicity influence]], while Captain America's {{Archenemy}} the ComicBook/RedSkull is a literal Nazi reviled by [[EvenEvilHasStandards reviled by all but like-minded individuals]].
** Superman and the ComicBook/FantasticFour are polar opposites in almost every way. Superman is traditionally portrayed as a borderline-demigod with a vast array of powerful abilities, but he has to cope with the inherent heartbreak of being [[TheLastOfHisKind [[LastOfHisKind the last member of a dying alien race]]; as such, [[IWorkAlone he typically fights alone]] when he's not with the ComicBook/JusticeLeague, Franchise/{{Justice League|OfAmerica}}, and he lost most of his family when he was too young to remember them. He's also famous for [[ClarkKenting keeping his secret identity so well-hidden]] that not even his love interest and his nemesis know who he really is. In contrast, the ComicBook/FantasticFour have worked as a group since the beginning, they each have one specific superpower, they're a lovably {{dysfunctional family}} in addition to a superhero team, and they don't have secret identities at all; in fact, they're all world-renowned celebrities. Interestingly, their origin stories are also mirror images of one another: Superman's story begins with him crashing to Earth in a rocket ship and getting superpowers from Earth's sun, while the Four's story begins with them flying into space in a rocket ship and getting superpowers from cosmic radiation.
** Superman and ComicBook/SpiderMan Franchise/SpiderMan are both iconic urban superheroes known for their distinctive [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue costumes]], and for wearing glasses and working at newspapers in their civilian identities; both of them also have [[CorruptCorporateExecutive evil corporate CEOs]] as their archenemies. But Superman is known for his raw strength and his brawny physique, and he's often thematically associated with the heavens due to his [[FlyingBrick flight powers]] and [[HumanAlien [[HumanAliens alien heritage]]. Spider-Man, on the other hand, is known for his agility and his wiry physique, and most depictions emphasize his closeness to the Earth due to his [[WorkingClassHero humble background]] and [[AnimalThemedSuperBeing insect motif]]. The Daily Planet is also traditionally portrayed sympathetically, with its reporters being crusading idealists driven to protect the truth, while the Daily Bugle is cast in a more morally ambiguous light, with J. Jonah Jameson's editorials [[HeroWithBadPublicity ruining Spidey's reputation]]. Superman's nemesis ComicBook/LexLuthor is also typically portrayed as a humanist scientific genius [[BadassNormal who can hold his own against superheroes with nothing but wits and gadgetry]]; by contrast, Spider-Man's nemesis ComicBook/NormanOsborn is usually portrayed as just a shrewd businessman who attempts to use science to transcend his human limitations, and ends up adopting a monstrous alter ego cloaked in supernatural trappings.



** ''ComicBook/LeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'' are both [[GenreThrowback Genre Throwbacks]] to old PulpMagazine stories, but League is a DeconstructionCrossover that makes heavy use of [[PublicDomainCharacter Public Domain Characters]] and features lots of sex and violence while Strong is more of a loving {{Homage}} and {{Reconstruction}} that mainly stars original characters and is on the whole much more LighterAndSofter than the former.
** After some CreatorBacklash following ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', more wrote ''ComicBook/NineteenSixtyThree'' as a {{Reconstruction}} of the superhero archetypes from ''Watchmen'', especially contrasting them with the Tomorrow Syndicate: Rorschach is a paranoid, rude nutjob, while the N-Man is, if still [[{{Pun}} thick-skinned]] and conservative, friendly enough to work on a team. The Hypernaut is, much like Ozymandias, an erudite transhumanist witha genetically modified pet (he even uses the same array of screens to maximize content absorbion as Ozzy), but lacks Adrian Veidt's AntiVillain tendencies. Infra-Man and his wife Infra-Girl mirror Night Owl and Silk Specter, a geeky scientist and a flirty, beautiful woman, who are, unlike their ''Watchmen'' counterparts, completely satisfied with their lives. Horus is a Doctor Manhattan analog: Immensely powerful and focused on inevitable death...except he's willing to avoid destruction at all costs. And the USA is, even in appearance, similar to the Comedian: An [[OldSuperhero aging]] patriotic secret agent and war veteran who works closely with the president. But USA isn't an AntiHero at all - as you can tell from how the JFK assassination plays out in both books - The Comedian is implied to have pulled the trigger, while the USA ''saves'' JFK by using his bulletproof body as a decoy.
* ''ComicBook/AllNewWolverine'' is this to previous ComicBook/{{X23}} and ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} stories with Laura doing everything she can to both overcome her own past and issues stemming from it and avoid pitfalls Logan often stumbles on, like his tendency to be a deadbeat parent. ''Enemy of the State II'' and ''Old Woman Laura'' in particular are exact opposite of Creator/MarkMillar stories ''Enemy of the State'' and ''ComicBook/OldManLogan''.
** In turn, the book has an antithesis in a series that was running at the same time, ''ComicBook/TotallyAwesomeHulk'', which is about another instance character from TurnOfTheMillennium becoming of AffirmativeActionLegacy to classic Marvel AntiHero, determined to not repeat his predecessor's mistakes. Except here Amadeus insistence to be better Hulk than Bruce Banner is portrayed as naivety and hubris and, especially as book changes titles to back to ''TheIncredibleHulk'' [[spoiler: he fails, spectacurally]].

to:

** ''ComicBook/LeagueOfExtraordinaryGentlemen'' and ''ComicBook/TomStrong'' are both [[GenreThrowback Genre Throwbacks]] {{Genre Throwback}}s to old PulpMagazine stories, but League is a DeconstructionCrossover that makes heavy use of [[PublicDomainCharacter Public {{Public Domain Characters]] Character}}s and features lots of sex and violence while Strong is more of a loving {{Homage}} and {{Reconstruction}} that mainly stars original characters and is on the whole much more LighterAndSofter than the former.
** After some CreatorBacklash following ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', more Moore wrote ''ComicBook/NineteenSixtyThree'' as a {{Reconstruction}} of the superhero archetypes from ''Watchmen'', especially contrasting them with the Tomorrow Syndicate: Rorschach is a paranoid, rude nutjob, while the N-Man is, if still [[{{Pun}} thick-skinned]] and conservative, friendly enough to work on a team. The Hypernaut is, much like Ozymandias, an erudite transhumanist witha with a genetically modified pet (he even uses the same array of screens to maximize content absorbion as Ozzy), but lacks Adrian Veidt's AntiVillain tendencies. Infra-Man and his wife Infra-Girl mirror Night Owl and Silk Specter, a geeky scientist and a flirty, beautiful woman, who are, unlike their ''Watchmen'' counterparts, completely satisfied with their lives. Horus is a Doctor Manhattan analog: Immensely powerful and focused on inevitable death...except he's willing to avoid destruction at all costs. And the USA is, even in appearance, similar to the Comedian: An [[OldSuperhero aging]] patriotic secret agent and war veteran who works closely with the president. But USA isn't an AntiHero at all - as you can tell from how the JFK assassination plays out in both books - The Comedian is implied to have pulled the trigger, while the USA ''saves'' JFK by using his bulletproof body as a decoy.
* ''ComicBook/AllNewWolverine'' is this to previous ComicBook/{{X23}} ComicBook/{{X 23}} and ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} Franchise/{{Wolverine}} stories with Laura doing everything she can to both overcome her own past and issues stemming from it and avoid pitfalls Logan often stumbles on, like his tendency to be a deadbeat parent. ''Enemy of the State II'' and ''Old Woman Laura'' in particular are the exact opposite of Creator/MarkMillar stories ''Enemy of the State'' and ''ComicBook/OldManLogan''.
** In turn, the book has an antithesis in a series that was running at the same time, ''ComicBook/TotallyAwesomeHulk'', which is about another instance character from the TurnOfTheMillennium becoming of AffirmativeActionLegacy to a classic Marvel AntiHero, determined to not repeat his predecessor's mistakes. Except here Amadeus insistence to be better Hulk than Bruce Banner is portrayed as naivety and hubris and, especially as book changes titles to back to ''TheIncredibleHulk'' ''ComicBook/IncredibleHulk'' [[spoiler: he fails, spectacurally]].spectacularly]].



* For Creator/GeoffJohns ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock'' is this for his earlier work, ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis''. ''Crisis'' was a huge, action-packed CrisisCrossover where DC heroes must fight an [[PhysicalGod immensely powerful]] character formerly ExiledFromContinuity, who is mad how DarkerAndEdgier the Franchise/DCUniverse has become and wants to force it back to how it once was. Once it ended it forced all books to do a one-year TimeSkip. ''Clock'' is a self-contained, focusing more on mystery than action miniseries about the threat of an [[RealityWarper immensely powerful]] CanonImmigrant who tries to force the DC Universe to become DarkerAndEdgier and [[ComicBook/New52 something new]]. It's set a year ahead of the rest of DC books, meaning once it ends other books will catch up to it without interrupting any storylines.

to:

* For Creator/GeoffJohns ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock'' is this for his earlier work, ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis''. ''Crisis'' was a huge, action-packed CrisisCrossover where DC heroes must fight an [[PhysicalGod immensely powerful]] character formerly ExiledFromContinuity, who is mad how DarkerAndEdgier the Franchise/DCUniverse Franchise/TheDCU has become and wants to force it back to how it once was. Once it ended it forced all books to do a one-year TimeSkip. ''Clock'' is a self-contained, focusing more on mystery than action miniseries about the threat of an [[RealityWarper immensely powerful]] CanonImmigrant who tries to force the DC Universe to become DarkerAndEdgier and [[ComicBook/New52 something new]]. It's set a year ahead of the rest of DC books, meaning once it ends other books will catch up to it without interrupting any storylines.



* Rob Liefeld's ''ComicBook/HeroesReborn'' was a DarkerAndEdgier revamp of the Avengers that epitomized the Dark Age of Comics. It was immediately followed by Kurt Busiek's epic run on the Avengers, which was a LighterAndSofter reconstruction of superheroes that helped bring an end to the Dark Age.

to:

* Rob Liefeld's Creator/RobLiefeld's ''ComicBook/HeroesReborn'' was a DarkerAndEdgier revamp of the Avengers that epitomized the Dark Age of Comics. It was immediately followed by Kurt Busiek's epic run on the Avengers, which was a LighterAndSofter reconstruction of superheroes that helped bring an end to the Dark Age.



** Creator/JackKirby's ''ComicBook/NewGods'' is one for his run on ''ComicBook/TheMightyThor''. While they both are a SpaceOpera that has powerful gods living among humans and fighting epic cosmic battles. But Thor is based on ''Myth/NorseMythology'' and contains more tropes you might find in {{Fantasy}} genre and presents a [[BlackAndWhiteMorality rather clear conflict]] between good and evil with epic battles, New Gods take most inspirations from works of Erich von Däniken, steers more towards ScienceFiction, presents a conflict of OrderVsChaos with LawfulEvil BigBad who, while mighty, preffers to work in more insidious ways and the story questions whether he can be beaten without his enemy becoming as bad as him.

to:

** Creator/JackKirby's ''ComicBook/NewGods'' is one for his run on ''ComicBook/TheMightyThor''. While they both are a SpaceOpera that has powerful gods living among humans and fighting epic cosmic battles. But Thor is based on ''Myth/NorseMythology'' and contains more tropes you might find in {{Fantasy}} genre and presents a [[BlackAndWhiteMorality rather clear conflict]] between good and evil with epic battles, New Gods take most inspirations from works of Erich von Däniken, steers more towards ScienceFiction, presents a conflict of OrderVsChaos OrderVersusChaos with LawfulEvil BigBad who, while mighty, preffers to work in more insidious ways and the story questions whether he can be beaten without his enemy becoming as bad as him.



* Grant Morrison's ''ComicBook/NewXMen'' is a deconstruction of the ''Franchise/XMen'' franchise that deliberately moved it into general sci-fi, involving the X-Men dealing with small-scale, mutant based crimes and conflicts. Joss Whedon's ''ComicBook/AstonishingXMen'', which came shortly after Morrison's, is a reconstruction that returns the characters to their superhero roots, involving the X-Men battling supervillains and working to prevent a cosmic threat from devastating Earth.

to:

* Grant Morrison's ''ComicBook/NewXMen'' is a deconstruction of the ''Franchise/XMen'' franchise that deliberately moved it into general sci-fi, involving the X-Men dealing with small-scale, mutant based crimes and conflicts. Joss Whedon's Creator/JossWhedon's ''ComicBook/AstonishingXMen'', which came shortly after Morrison's, is a reconstruction that returns the characters to their superhero roots, involving the X-Men battling supervillains and working to prevent a cosmic threat from devastating Earth.



* ''[[{{ComicBook/Legacy}} Star Wars Legacy]]'' is this to ''[[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords Knights Of The Old Republic II]]''. Whereas KOTRII is an unrelenting and ruthless deconstruction that simply tears apart and criticizes the ''Star Wars'' universe, ''Legacy'' deconstructs the setting only to then examine the positive aspects of it (as opposed to bringing strong focus on the negative) and [[{{Reconstruction}} puts it back together]].

to:

* ''[[{{ComicBook/Legacy}} Star Wars Legacy]]'' is this to ''[[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords Knights Of The ''VideoGame/{{Knights of the Old Republic II]]''.II|TheSithLords}}''. Whereas KOTRII is an unrelenting and ruthless deconstruction that simply tears apart and criticizes the ''Star Wars'' universe, ''Legacy'' deconstructs the setting only to then examine the positive aspects of it (as opposed to bringing strong focus on the negative) and [[{{Reconstruction}} puts it back together]].



* ComicBook/MarvelNoir and ComicBook/Marvel1602 can be considered this to ComicBook/Marvel2099, Marvel 1602 especially. Marvel 2099 thrust the heroes of the Marvel universe into the far future, treated the present-day stories as canonical and important to the overarching metanarrative, and had a cyberpunk motif and themes. The Noir and 1602 [[TheVerse Verses]] are both set in a distant past (around Prohibition era and the age of exploration, respectively). They have more of a Steampunk (or perhaps noir) feel to them, and don't treat the current-day stories as canon (except in the case of 1602... [[StableTimeLoop it's complicated.]] Marvel Noir shares 2099's pessimistic atmosphere, but unlike it, doesn't have the heroes sharing a single, cohesive world, whereas Marvel 1602 is set in a single [[TheVerse 'verse]] and is much more optimistic.

to:

* ComicBook/MarvelNoir and ComicBook/Marvel1602 can be considered this to ComicBook/Marvel2099, Marvel 1602 especially. Marvel 2099 thrust the heroes of the Marvel universe into the far future, treated the present-day stories as canonical and important to the overarching metanarrative, and had a cyberpunk motif and themes. The Noir and 1602 [[TheVerse Verses]] are both set in a distant past (around Prohibition era and the age of exploration, respectively). They have more of a Steampunk (or perhaps noir) feel to them, and don't treat the current-day stories as canon (except in the case of 1602... [[StableTimeLoop it's complicated.]] )]] Marvel Noir shares 2099's pessimistic atmosphere, but unlike it, doesn't have the heroes sharing a single, cohesive world, whereas Marvel 1602 is set in a single [[TheVerse 'verse]] and is much more optimistic.



** Ellis must love this trope -- when Creator/KurtBusiek and Creator/AlexRoss created ''ComicBook/{{Marvels}}'', a [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructing]] but still idealistic portrayal of MarvelUniverse, Ellis wrote ''Ruins'' -- a depressing AlternateUniverse where everything that could go wrong did, worse than you can imagine -- that is generally seen as [[FanNickname Marvels' Evil Twin]]. When Busiek made a sequel to ''Marvels'', Ellis responded with ''Ghost Boxes'' -- a compilation of alternate Universes where the ComicBook/XMen failed to stop the threat from his ''Astonishing X-Men'' series, each more depressing than the previous one.

to:

** Ellis must love this trope -- when Creator/KurtBusiek and Creator/AlexRoss created ''ComicBook/{{Marvels}}'', a [[{{Deconstruction}} deconstructing]] but still idealistic portrayal of MarvelUniverse, the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, Ellis wrote ''Ruins'' -- a depressing AlternateUniverse where everything that could go wrong did, worse than you can imagine -- that is generally seen as [[FanNickname Marvels' Evil Twin]]. When Busiek made a sequel to ''Marvels'', Ellis responded with ''Ghost Boxes'' -- a compilation of alternate Universes where the ComicBook/XMen failed to stop the threat from his ''Astonishing X-Men'' series, each more depressing than the previous one.


* ''[[{{ComicBook/Legacy}} Star Wars Legacy]]'' is this to ''[[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords Knights Of The Old Republic II]]''. Whereas KOTRII is an unrelenting and ruthless deconstruction that simply tears apart and criticizes the ''Star Wars'' universe, ''Legacy'' deconstructs the setting only to than examine the positive aspects of it (as opposed to bringing strong focus on the negative) and [[{{Reconstruction}} puts it back together]].

to:

* ''[[{{ComicBook/Legacy}} Star Wars Legacy]]'' is this to ''[[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords Knights Of The Old Republic II]]''. Whereas KOTRII is an unrelenting and ruthless deconstruction that simply tears apart and criticizes the ''Star Wars'' universe, ''Legacy'' deconstructs the setting only to than then examine the positive aspects of it (as opposed to bringing strong focus on the negative) and [[{{Reconstruction}} puts it back together]].


** In turn, the book has an antithesis in a series that was running at the same time, ''ComicBook/TotallyAwesomeHulk'', which is about another instance character from TurnOfTheMillennium becoming of AffirmativeActionLegacy to classic Marvel AntiHero, determined to not repeat his predecessor's mistakes. Except here Amadeus insistence to be better Hulk than Bruce Banner is portrayed as naivety and hubris and, especially as book changes titles to back to ''TheIncredibleHulk'' [[spoiler: He fails, spectacurally]]

to:

** In turn, the book has an antithesis in a series that was running at the same time, ''ComicBook/TotallyAwesomeHulk'', which is about another instance character from TurnOfTheMillennium becoming of AffirmativeActionLegacy to classic Marvel AntiHero, determined to not repeat his predecessor's mistakes. Except here Amadeus insistence to be better Hulk than Bruce Banner is portrayed as naivety and hubris and, especially as book changes titles to back to ''TheIncredibleHulk'' [[spoiler: He he fails, spectacurally]] spectacurally]].


Added DiffLines:

* Creator/GarthEnnis wrote ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'' as an episodic story with a theme that despite all the ridiculousness and horribleness the book showcases America and its people have good in them and villains who in the end all bring their own downfall by either incompetence or by creating monsters they cannot truly control. ''ComicBook/TheBoys'' on the other hand has a larger ongoing intrigue and shows America as deeply rotten, with very few actually good people in it ''on top'' of all the ridiculousness and horribleness, while the villains are still incompetent and creating monsters they cannot truly control, but are also too big to fall. To put it simply, ''Preacher'' is written by Ennis who, for all his trademark cynicism, still believes in American Dream, while ''The Boys'' is written by Ennis who no longer does.


*** ''ComicBook/{{Aquaman}}'' in turn is this to Namor - he takes the basic idea and cuts out lingering similarities to Superman like flying, but portrays the main character as purely heroic. In fact, when Namor was known for his HeelFaceRevolvingDoor attitude even back then, as often fighting the Axis forces as the Allies, the first thing we see Aquaman do is to attack a Nazi ship to leave no doubt whose side he is on.



** After some CreatorBacklash following ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', more wrote ''ComicBook/NineteenSixtyThree'' as a {{Reconstruction}} of the superhero archetypes from ''Watchmen'', especially contrasting them with the Tomorrow Syndicate: Rorschach is a paranoid, rude nutjob, while the N-Man is, if still [[{{Pun}} thick-skinned]] and conservative, friendly enough to work on a team. The Hypernaut is, much like Ozymandias, an erudite transhumanist witha genetically modified pet (he even uses the same array of screens to maximize content absorbion as Ozzy), but lacks Adrian Veidt's AntiVillain tendencies. Infra-Man and his wife Infra-Girl mirror Night Owl and Silk Specter, a geeky scientist and a flirty, beautiful woman, who are, unlike their ''Watchmen'' counterparts, completely satisfied with their lives. Horus is a Doctor Manhattan analogue: Immensively powerful and focused on inevitable death...except he's willing to avoid destruction at all costs. And the USA is, even in appearance, similar to the Comedian: An [[OldSuperhero aging]] patriotic secret agent and war veteran who works closely with the president. But USA isn't an AntiHero at all - as you can tell from how the JFK assassination plays out in both books - The Comedian is implied to have pulled the trigger, while the USA ''saves'' JFK by using his bulletproof body as a decoy.
* ''ComicBook/AllNewWolverine'' is this to previous ComicBook/X23 and ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} stories with Laura doing everything she can to both overcome her own past and issues stemming from it and avoid pitfalls Logan often stumbles on, like his tendency to be a deadbeat parent. ''Enemy of the State II'' and ''Old Woman Laura'' in particular are exact opposite of Creator/MarkMillar stories ''Enemy of the State'' and ''ComicBook/OldManLogan''.

to:

** After some CreatorBacklash following ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', more wrote ''ComicBook/NineteenSixtyThree'' as a {{Reconstruction}} of the superhero archetypes from ''Watchmen'', especially contrasting them with the Tomorrow Syndicate: Rorschach is a paranoid, rude nutjob, while the N-Man is, if still [[{{Pun}} thick-skinned]] and conservative, friendly enough to work on a team. The Hypernaut is, much like Ozymandias, an erudite transhumanist witha genetically modified pet (he even uses the same array of screens to maximize content absorbion as Ozzy), but lacks Adrian Veidt's AntiVillain tendencies. Infra-Man and his wife Infra-Girl mirror Night Owl and Silk Specter, a geeky scientist and a flirty, beautiful woman, who are, unlike their ''Watchmen'' counterparts, completely satisfied with their lives. Horus is a Doctor Manhattan analogue: Immensively analog: Immensely powerful and focused on inevitable death...except he's willing to avoid destruction at all costs. And the USA is, even in appearance, similar to the Comedian: An [[OldSuperhero aging]] patriotic secret agent and war veteran who works closely with the president. But USA isn't an AntiHero at all - as you can tell from how the JFK assassination plays out in both books - The Comedian is implied to have pulled the trigger, while the USA ''saves'' JFK by using his bulletproof body as a decoy.
* ''ComicBook/AllNewWolverine'' is this to previous ComicBook/X23 ComicBook/{{X23}} and ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} stories with Laura doing everything she can to both overcome her own past and issues stemming from it and avoid pitfalls Logan often stumbles on, like his tendency to be a deadbeat parent. ''Enemy of the State II'' and ''Old Woman Laura'' in particular are exact opposite of Creator/MarkMillar stories ''Enemy of the State'' and ''ComicBook/OldManLogan''.



* ''ComicBook/DCeased'' is this to both ''ComicBook/MarvelZombies'' and to ''ComicBook/InjusticeGodsAmongUs''

to:

* ''ComicBook/DCeased'' ''ComicBook/{{DCeased}}'' is this to both ''ComicBook/MarvelZombies'' and to ''ComicBook/InjusticeGodsAmongUs''


* ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' villain Superboy Prime is one in the titular protagonist of ''ComicBook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool''. Both share origin stories of being teenage fans of superhero comics from our world who [[AscendedFanboy enters their favorite Universe and gets superpowers]], only to be disappointed that things do not work out as they imagined. The difference lies on how they react and what kinds of fans they represent. Prime represents lifelong fans who become bitter with how much the Franchise/DCUniverse has changed. He wants to brutally force it back to the way it once was and as he goes along, he stops caring how many he kills since he doesn't consider them real anyway. On the other hand, Gwen represents news fans who are aware of the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's mamy problems and love the franchise despite them. While she starts thinking she can do whatever she wants since none of it is real, she is quickly humbled and comes to care for others like real people. Prime embraces villainy as a alternative of being forgotten, while a FaceHeelTurn is the only things that terrifies Gwen more than ComicBookLimbo. Finally, Prime was a huge fan of Superman before coming to hate him, while Gwen named herself after Deadpool JustForPun and doesn't event read his comics.

to:

* ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' villain Superboy Prime is has one in the titular protagonist of ''ComicBook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool''. Both share origin stories of being teenage fans of superhero comics from our world who [[AscendedFanboy enters their favorite Universe and gets superpowers]], only to be disappointed that things do not work out as they imagined. The difference lies on how they react and what kinds of fans they represent. Prime represents lifelong fans who become bitter with how much the Franchise/DCUniverse has changed. He wants to brutally force it back to the way it once was and as he goes along, he stops caring how many he kills since he doesn't consider them real anyway. On the other hand, Gwen represents news fans who are aware of the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's mamy problems and love the franchise despite them. While she starts thinking she can do whatever she wants since none of it is real, she is quickly humbled and comes to care for others like real people. Prime embraces villainy as a alternative of being forgotten, while a FaceHeelTurn is the only things that terrifies Gwen more than ComicBookLimbo. Finally, Prime was a huge fan of Superman before coming to hate him, while Gwen named herself after Deadpool JustForPun and doesn't event read his comics.



** After some CreatorBacklash following ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', more wrote ''ComicBook/NineteenSixtyThree'' as a {{Reconstruction}} of the superhero archetypes from ''Watchmen'', especially contrasting them with the Tomorrow Syndicate: Rorschach is a paranoid, rude nutjob, while the N-Man is, if still [[{{Pun}} thick-skinned]] and conservative, friendly enough to work on a team. The Hypernaut is, much like Ozymandias, an erudite transhumanist witha genetically modified pet (he even uses the same array of screens to maximize content absorbion as Ozzy), but lacks Adrian Veidt's AntiVillain tendencies. Infra-Man and his wife Infra-Girl mirror Night Owl and Silk Specter, a geeky scientist and a flirty, beautiful woman, who are, unlike their ''Watchmen'' counterparts, completely satisfied with their lives. Horus is a Doctor Manhattan analogue: Immensively powerful and focused on inevitable death...except he's willing to avoid destruction at all costs. And the USA is, even in appearance, similar to the Comedian: An [[OldSuperhero aging]] patriotic secret agent and war veteran who works closely with the president. But USA isn't an AntiHero at all - as you can tell from how the JFK assassination plays oun in both books - The Comedian is implied to have pulled the trigger, while the USA ''saves'' JFK by uing his bulletproof body as a decoy.
* Creator/SaladinAhmed admitted that his runs on ''[[ComicBook/MilesMorales Miles Morales: Spider-Man]]'' and ''[[ComicBook/MsMarvel2014 The Magnificent Ms. Marvel]]'' are this both to his predecessors' runs on the characters and each other. Miles under Creator/BrianBendis constantly had to deal with high stakes but at the consequence of his supporting cast and corner of the world remaining underdeveloped. Under Creator/GWillowWilson Kamala was allowed room for character development of her and her supporting cast as well as a lot of worldbuilding but stakes most of the time were pretty low. So with Miles Ahmed wants to focus on the supporting cast and worldbuilding while for Kamala he is raising the stakes.

to:

** After some CreatorBacklash following ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', more wrote ''ComicBook/NineteenSixtyThree'' as a {{Reconstruction}} of the superhero archetypes from ''Watchmen'', especially contrasting them with the Tomorrow Syndicate: Rorschach is a paranoid, rude nutjob, while the N-Man is, if still [[{{Pun}} thick-skinned]] and conservative, friendly enough to work on a team. The Hypernaut is, much like Ozymandias, an erudite transhumanist witha genetically modified pet (he even uses the same array of screens to maximize content absorbion as Ozzy), but lacks Adrian Veidt's AntiVillain tendencies. Infra-Man and his wife Infra-Girl mirror Night Owl and Silk Specter, a geeky scientist and a flirty, beautiful woman, who are, unlike their ''Watchmen'' counterparts, completely satisfied with their lives. Horus is a Doctor Manhattan analogue: Immensively powerful and focused on inevitable death...except he's willing to avoid destruction at all costs. And the USA is, even in appearance, similar to the Comedian: An [[OldSuperhero aging]] patriotic secret agent and war veteran who works closely with the president. But USA isn't an AntiHero at all - as you can tell from how the JFK assassination plays oun out in both books - The Comedian is implied to have pulled the trigger, while the USA ''saves'' JFK by uing using his bulletproof body as a decoy.
* Creator/SaladinAhmed admitted ''ComicBook/AllNewWolverine'' is this to previous ComicBook/X23 and ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} stories with Laura doing everything she can to both overcome her own past and issues stemming from it and avoid pitfalls Logan often stumbles on, like his tendency to be a deadbeat parent. ''Enemy of the State II'' and ''Old Woman Laura'' in particular are exact opposite of Creator/MarkMillar stories ''Enemy of the State'' and ''ComicBook/OldManLogan''.
** In turn, the book has an antithesis in a series
that his runs on ''[[ComicBook/MilesMorales Miles Morales: Spider-Man]]'' and ''[[ComicBook/MsMarvel2014 The Magnificent Ms. Marvel]]'' are this both to his predecessors' runs on the characters and each other. Miles under Creator/BrianBendis constantly had to deal with high stakes but was running at the consequence of his supporting cast and corner of the world remaining underdeveloped. Under Creator/GWillowWilson Kamala was allowed room for same time, ''ComicBook/TotallyAwesomeHulk'', which is about another instance character development from TurnOfTheMillennium becoming of her AffirmativeActionLegacy to classic Marvel AntiHero, determined to not repeat his predecessor's mistakes. Except here Amadeus insistence to be better Hulk than Bruce Banner is portrayed as naivety and her supporting cast hubris and, especially as well as a lot book changes titles to back to ''TheIncredibleHulk'' [[spoiler: He fails, spectacurally]]
* The creators
of worldbuilding but stakes most of ''ComicBook/{{Cerebus}}'' and ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}'' got into an infamous feud during the time were pretty low. So books' runs. It makes sense, then, that their books can be considered antithesis to each other - both are black and white fantasy stories, incredibly long-running, and feature a title character that [[GenreRefugee he'd belong in a much more lighthearted book]]. But, ''Bone'' is a wholesome comic, with Miles Ahmed wants to focus on the supporting cast hero being a goofy, kind-hearted guy, and worldbuilding the fantasy world is a classic HighFantasy culture, while Cerebus features a SociopathicHero, living in a violent dystopia full of corruption, and is known for Kamala he is raising the stakes. its [[CerebusSyndrome descent into seriousness]].



* For Creator/GeoffJohns ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock'' is this for his earlier work, ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis''. ''Crisis'' was a huge, action-packed CrisisCrossover where DC heroes must fight an [[PhysicalGod immensely powerful]] character formerly ExiledFromContinuity, who is mad how DarkerAndEdgier the Franchise/DCUniverse has become and wants to force it back to how it once was. Once it ended it forced all books to do a one year TimeSkip. ''Clock'' is a self-contained, focusing more on mystery than action miniseries about threat of an [[RealityWarper immensly powerful]] CanonImmigrant who tries to force the DC Universe to become DarkerAndEdgier and [[ComicBook/New52 something new]]. It's set a year ahead of the rest of DC books, meaning once it ends other books will catch up to it without interrupting any storylines.

to:

* ''ComicBook/DCeased'' is this to both ''ComicBook/MarvelZombies'' and to ''ComicBook/InjusticeGodsAmongUs''
** Just as ''Marvel Zombies'' it is an ExpendableAlternateUniverse story of superheroes dealing with a ZombieApocalypse. But instead of being a BlackComedy where zombifications make people amoral cannibals but let them retain their intelligence like ''Marvel Zombies'', it plays off more like a traditional zombie story, with mindless hordes of undead and things being played for drama, not laughs.
** When compared to ''Injustice'' it has a tendency to give heroic roles to characters who are evil or dead in that story, like Superman or Damian Wayne, while quickly killing of those who were crucial for ''Injustice'' storyline [[spoiler: including Joker, Catwoman and even Batman himself]].
* For Creator/GeoffJohns ''ComicBook/DoomsdayClock'' is this for his earlier work, ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis''. ''Crisis'' was a huge, action-packed CrisisCrossover where DC heroes must fight an [[PhysicalGod immensely powerful]] character formerly ExiledFromContinuity, who is mad how DarkerAndEdgier the Franchise/DCUniverse has become and wants to force it back to how it once was. Once it ended it forced all books to do a one year one-year TimeSkip. ''Clock'' is a self-contained, focusing more on mystery than action miniseries about the threat of an [[RealityWarper immensly immensely powerful]] CanonImmigrant who tries to force the DC Universe to become DarkerAndEdgier and [[ComicBook/New52 something new]]. It's set a year ahead of the rest of DC books, meaning once it ends other books will catch up to it without interrupting any storylines.



* Creator/BrianKVaughan's ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}'' has Allan Heinberg's ''ComicBook/YoungAvengers''. In the '00s (2003 and 2005 respectively) the two of them were introduced as Marvel's primary teenage super teams, in an effort to appeal to young adult readers and capture the market DC had with the ''ComicBook/TeenTitans''. They were highly successful on that front, being acclaimed and award-winning comics with large followings to this day. While both teams consist of young heroes that combines FantasyKitchenSink origins in one setting, they also greatly diverge in terms of execution. The Runaways are from Los Angeles, away from much of the superhero action, and are not a traditional superhero team, as they don't have costumes or codenames, and they openly mock superhero tropes commonly associated with the genre, nor do they think of themselves as superheroes. They also always have more female members than male, another inversion of the norm. In contrast, the Young Avengers are from New York City, the core of the superhero culture, and are very much a traditional superhero team that are more in line with the ''Teen Titans'', complete with costumes, codenames, and they embrace superhero traditions up to the point of considering themselves as superheroes. Fittingly, they always have more male members than female, adhering to TwoGirlsToATeam. Going further, the Runaways each have [[ArchnemesisDad evil parents]] that led to them becoming heroes by force, while the Young Avengers all take on [[LegacyCharacter heroic legacies]]. Lastly, the Runaways (being the non-traditional team) aren't really active as part of the superhero community outside of company-wide crossovers that happen to get to them, and the Young Avengers (being the traditional one) are much more involved in the universe as a whole.

to:

* Creator/BrianKVaughan's ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}'' has Allan Heinberg's ''ComicBook/YoungAvengers''. In the '00s (2003 and 2005 respectively) the two of them were introduced as Marvel's primary teenage super teams, in an effort to appeal to young adult readers and capture the market DC had with the ''ComicBook/TeenTitans''. They were highly successful on that front, being acclaimed and award-winning comics with large followings to this day. While both teams consist of young heroes that combines FantasyKitchenSink origins in one setting, they also greatly diverge in terms of execution. The Runaways are from Los Angeles, away from much of the superhero action, and are not a traditional superhero team, as they don't have costumes or codenames, and they openly mock superhero tropes commonly associated with the genre, nor do they think of themselves as superheroes. They also always have more female members than male, another inversion of the norm. In contrast, the Young Avengers are from New York City, the core of the superhero culture, and are very much a traditional superhero team that are more in line with the ''Teen Titans'', complete with costumes, codenames, and they embrace superhero traditions up to the point of considering themselves as superheroes. Fittingly, they always have more male members than female, adhering to TwoGirlsToATeam. Going further, the Runaways each have [[ArchnemesisDad evil parents]] that led to them becoming heroes by force, while the Young Avengers all take on [[LegacyCharacter heroic legacies]]. Lastly, the Runaways (being the non-traditional team) aren't really active as part of the superhero community outside of company-wide crossovers that happen to get to them, and the Young Avengers (being the traditional one) are much more involved in the universe as a whole. Ironically, the two titles are known for their FriendlyFandoms.
* Creator/SaladinAhmed admitted that his runs on ''[[ComicBook/MilesMorales Miles Morales: Spider-Man]]'' and ''[[ComicBook/MsMarvel2014 The Magnificent Ms. Marvel]]'' are this both to his predecessors' runs on the characters and each other. Miles under Creator/BrianBendis constantly had to deal with high stakes but at the consequence of his supporting cast and corner of the world remaining underdeveloped. Under Creator/GWillowWilson Kamala was allowed room for character development of her and her supporting cast as well as a lot of worldbuilding but stakes most of the time were pretty low. So with Miles Ahmed wants to focus on the supporting cast and worldbuilding while for Kamala he is raising the stakes.



* The creators of ''ComicBook/{{Cerebus}}'' and ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}'' got into an infamous feud during the books' runs. It makes sense, then, that their books can be considered antithesis to each other - both are black and white fantasy stories, incredibly long-running, and feature a title character that [[GenreRefugee he'd belong in a much more lighthearted book]]. But, ''Bone'' is a wholesome comic, with the hero being a goofy, kind-hearted guy, and the fantasy world is a classic HighFantasy culture, while Cerebus features a SociopathicHero, living in a violent dystopia full of corruption, and is known for its [[CerebusSyndrome descent into seriousness]].


* ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' villain Superboy Prime ias one in the titular protagonist of ''ComicBook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool''. Both share the origin od a teenage fan od superhero comics from our world who [[AscendedFanboy enters their favorite Universe and gets superpowers]], only to be disappointed things do not work out as they imagined. The difference lies on how they react and what kind od fan they represent. Prime represents lifelong fans who become bitter with how much DCU has changed. He wants to brute force it info the way it once was and as he goes along he stops caring how mamy he kills since he doesn't consider them real anyway. Gwen represents news fans who are aware of Marvel Universe's mamy problems and love it despite them. While she starts thinking she can do whatever she wants since none of it is real, she is quickly humbled and comes to care for others like of real people. Prime embraces villainy as a alternative of being forgotten, while FaceHeelTurn is the only things that terrifies Gwen more than ComicBookLimbo. Finally, Prime was a huge fan od Superman before coming to hate him, while Gwen named herself after Deadpool JustForPun and doesn't event read his comics.

to:

* ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' villain Superboy Prime ias is one in the titular protagonist of ''ComicBook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool''. Both share the origin od a stories of being teenage fan od fans of superhero comics from our world who [[AscendedFanboy enters their favorite Universe and gets superpowers]], only to be disappointed that things do not work out as they imagined. The difference lies on how they react and what kind od fan kinds of fans they represent. Prime represents lifelong fans who become bitter with how much DCU the Franchise/DCUniverse has changed. He wants to brute brutally force it info back to the way it once was and as he goes along along, he stops caring how mamy many he kills since he doesn't consider them real anyway. On the other hand, Gwen represents news fans who are aware of Marvel Universe's the Franchise/MarvelUniverse's mamy problems and love it the franchise despite them. While she starts thinking she can do whatever she wants since none of it is real, she is quickly humbled and comes to care for others like of real people. Prime embraces villainy as a alternative of being forgotten, while a FaceHeelTurn is the only things that terrifies Gwen more than ComicBookLimbo. Finally, Prime was a huge fan od of Superman before coming to hate him, while Gwen named herself after Deadpool JustForPun and doesn't event read his comics.

Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis'' villain Superboy Prime ias one in the titular protagonist of ''ComicBook/TheUnbelievableGwenpool''. Both share the origin od a teenage fan od superhero comics from our world who [[AscendedFanboy enters their favorite Universe and gets superpowers]], only to be disappointed things do not work out as they imagined. The difference lies on how they react and what kind od fan they represent. Prime represents lifelong fans who become bitter with how much DCU has changed. He wants to brute force it info the way it once was and as he goes along he stops caring how mamy he kills since he doesn't consider them real anyway. Gwen represents news fans who are aware of Marvel Universe's mamy problems and love it despite them. While she starts thinking she can do whatever she wants since none of it is real, she is quickly humbled and comes to care for others like of real people. Prime embraces villainy as a alternative of being forgotten, while FaceHeelTurn is the only things that terrifies Gwen more than ComicBookLimbo. Finally, Prime was a huge fan od Superman before coming to hate him, while Gwen named herself after Deadpool JustForPun and doesn't event read his comics.


*** Following this vein of logic, compare and contrast Batman and Spider-Man's respective [[{{Archenemy}} Archenemies]], ComicBook/TheJoker and ComicBook/NormanOsborn. Aside from their aforementioned similar purple and green color schemes and propensity for insanity, both frequently harm the hero's loved ones, often times ForTheEvulz (The Joker [[ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily killing Jason Todd]] and [[ComicBook/TheKillingJoke crippling Barbara Gordon]], The Green Goblin [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied killing Gwen Stacy]]). In addition, both of their origin stories involve exposure to dangerous chemicals (the Joker falling into a vat of chemicals, the Green Goblin being exposed to an PsychoSerum of his own creation). But here's the fluke: Whereas the Joker's true name and life ''before'' his accident has been [[ThatManIsDead lost to history]], with [[MultipleChoicePast various theories being postulated]], the Green Goblin has had a consistent secret identity - Norman Osborn, a corrupt industrialist. In addition, the Joker persona has consumed the man before the accident, while Osborn and the Goblin [[JekyllAndHyde are portrayed as two different personalities]], often times at conflict with each other. There's also an inversion in status befitting of the heroes -- The Joker is a crimelord who doesn't have [[VillainousUnderdog nearly as many resources as Batman]] and gets by through his wits and insanity, while Osborn is a multi-millionaire industrialist with vast resources and connections, making him an overdog to the working-class Spider-Man. Furthermore, DC has traditionally left it ambiguous on whether the Joker knows Batman's identity, while Marvel has made it clear that the Goblin knows that Peter Parker is Spider-Man.

to:

*** Following this vein of logic, compare and contrast Batman and Spider-Man's respective [[{{Archenemy}} Archenemies]], ComicBook/TheJoker and ComicBook/NormanOsborn. Aside from their aforementioned similar purple and green color schemes and propensity for insanity, both frequently harm the hero's loved ones, often times ForTheEvulz (The Joker [[ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily killing Jason Todd]] and [[ComicBook/TheKillingJoke crippling Barbara Gordon]], The Green Goblin [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied killing Gwen Stacy]]). In addition, both of their origin stories involve exposure to dangerous chemicals (the Joker falling into a vat of chemicals, the Green Goblin being exposed to an PsychoSerum of his own creation). But here's the fluke: Whereas the Joker's true name and life ''before'' his accident has been [[ThatManIsDead lost to history]], with [[MultipleChoicePast various theories being postulated]], the Green Goblin has had a consistent secret identity - Norman Osborn, a corrupt industrialist.industrialist[[note]]Interestingly, Osborn's Green Goblin persona was derived from the monster from his childhood nightmares. [[Franchise/{{Batman}} Sound familiar]]? [[/note]]. In addition, the Joker persona has consumed the man before the accident, while Osborn and the Goblin [[JekyllAndHyde are portrayed as two different personalities]], often times at conflict with each other. There's also an inversion in status befitting of the heroes -- The Joker is a crimelord who doesn't have [[VillainousUnderdog nearly as many resources as Batman]] and gets by through his wits and insanity, while Osborn is a multi-millionaire industrialist with vast resources and connections, making him an overdog to the working-class Spider-Man. Furthermore, DC has traditionally left it ambiguous on whether the Joker knows Batman's identity, while Marvel has made it clear that the Goblin knows that Peter Parker is Spider-Man.


*** Following this vein of logic, compare and contrast Batman and Spider-Man's respective [[{{Archenemy}} Archenemies]], ComicBook/TheJoker and ComicBook/NormanOsborn. Aside from their aforementioned similar purple and green color schemes and propensity for insanity, both frequently harm the hero's loved ones, often times ForTheEvulz (The Joker [[ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily killing Jason Todd]] and [[ComicBook/TheKillingJoke crippling Barbara Gordon]], The Green Goblin [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied killing Gwen Stacy]]). In addition, both of their origin stories involve exposure to dangerous chemicals (the Joker falling into a vat of chemicals, the Green Goblin being exposed to an PsychoSerum of his own creation). But here's the fluke: Whereas the Joker's true name and life ''before'' his accident has been [[ThatManIsDead lost to history]], with [[MultipleChoicePast various theories being postulated]], the Green Goblin has had a consistent secret identity - Norman Osborn, a corrupt industrialist. In addition, the Joker persona has consumed the man before the accident, while Osborn and the Goblin [[JekyllAndHyde are portrayed as two different personalities]], often times at conflict with each other. Furthermore, DC has traditionally left it ambiguous on whether the Joker knows Batman's identity, while Marvel has made it clear that the Goblin knows that Peter Parker is Spider-Man.

to:

*** Following this vein of logic, compare and contrast Batman and Spider-Man's respective [[{{Archenemy}} Archenemies]], ComicBook/TheJoker and ComicBook/NormanOsborn. Aside from their aforementioned similar purple and green color schemes and propensity for insanity, both frequently harm the hero's loved ones, often times ForTheEvulz (The Joker [[ComicBook/ADeathInTheFamily killing Jason Todd]] and [[ComicBook/TheKillingJoke crippling Barbara Gordon]], The Green Goblin [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied killing Gwen Stacy]]). In addition, both of their origin stories involve exposure to dangerous chemicals (the Joker falling into a vat of chemicals, the Green Goblin being exposed to an PsychoSerum of his own creation). But here's the fluke: Whereas the Joker's true name and life ''before'' his accident has been [[ThatManIsDead lost to history]], with [[MultipleChoicePast various theories being postulated]], the Green Goblin has had a consistent secret identity - Norman Osborn, a corrupt industrialist. In addition, the Joker persona has consumed the man before the accident, while Osborn and the Goblin [[JekyllAndHyde are portrayed as two different personalities]], often times at conflict with each other. There's also an inversion in status befitting of the heroes -- The Joker is a crimelord who doesn't have [[VillainousUnderdog nearly as many resources as Batman]] and gets by through his wits and insanity, while Osborn is a multi-millionaire industrialist with vast resources and connections, making him an overdog to the working-class Spider-Man. Furthermore, DC has traditionally left it ambiguous on whether the Joker knows Batman's identity, while Marvel has made it clear that the Goblin knows that Peter Parker is Spider-Man.


* ComicBook/MarvelNoir and ComicBook/Marvel1602 can be considered this to ComicBook/Marvel2099, Marvel 1602 especially. Marvel 2099 thrust the heroes of the Marvel universe into the far future, treated the present-day stories as canonical and important to the overarching metanarrative, and had a cyberpunk motif and themes. The Noir and 1602 [[TheVerse Verses]] are both set in a distant past (around Prohibition era and the age of exploration, respectively). They have more of a Steampunk (or perhaps [[CaptainObvious noir]]) feel to them, and don't treat the current-day stories as canon (except in the case of 1602... [[StableTimeLoop it's complicated.]] Marvel Noir shares 2099's pessimistic atmosphere, but unlike it, doesn't have the heroes sharing a single, cohesive world, whereas Marvel 1602 is set in a single [[TheVerse 'verse]] and is much more optimistic.

to:

* ComicBook/MarvelNoir and ComicBook/Marvel1602 can be considered this to ComicBook/Marvel2099, Marvel 1602 especially. Marvel 2099 thrust the heroes of the Marvel universe into the far future, treated the present-day stories as canonical and important to the overarching metanarrative, and had a cyberpunk motif and themes. The Noir and 1602 [[TheVerse Verses]] are both set in a distant past (around Prohibition era and the age of exploration, respectively). They have more of a Steampunk (or perhaps [[CaptainObvious noir]]) noir) feel to them, and don't treat the current-day stories as canon (except in the case of 1602... [[StableTimeLoop it's complicated.]] Marvel Noir shares 2099's pessimistic atmosphere, but unlike it, doesn't have the heroes sharing a single, cohesive world, whereas Marvel 1602 is set in a single [[TheVerse 'verse]] and is much more optimistic.


** Another [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] antithesis to Superman is ComicBook/CaptainAmerica. Both are [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue-wearing]] superheroes with [[TheCape idealistic]] [[{{Eagleland}} attitudes of America]] who grew up in poverty and grew up to serve as the traditional {{BigGood}}s of their respective universes. However, whereas Superman is an extraterrestrial whose abilities were innate and manifested themselves when he arrived on Earth (i.e., Nature), Captain America was born an ordinary human who, as an adult, was given a SuperSerum by the U.S. military that enhanced his peak abilities (i.e., Nurture). In addition, Superman has traditionally no need for physical weapons, instead using his aforementioned Kryptonian powers, while Cap's WeaponOfChoice is his [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe trademark shield]]. While Superman is an alien who often feels alone on Earth as the LastOfHisKind, Captain America sometimes feels out of his time, being a World War II veteran in modern society.

to:

** Another [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] antithesis to Superman is ComicBook/CaptainAmerica. Both are [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue-wearing]] superheroes with [[TheCape idealistic]] [[{{Eagleland}} attitudes of America]] who grew up in poverty and grew up to serve as the traditional {{BigGood}}s {{Big Good}}s of their respective universes. In addition, both heroes' {{ArchEnemies}} are [[BaldOfEvil bald villains]] who seek to TakeOverTheWorld (ComicBook/LexLuthor for Supes, The ComicBook/RedSkull for Cap). However, one interesting contrast is how they embody opposite sides of the NatureVersusNurture debate: whereas Superman is an extraterrestrial whose abilities were innate and manifested themselves when he arrived on Earth (i.e., Nature), Captain America was born an ordinary human who, as an adult, was given a SuperSerum by the U.S. military that enhanced his peak abilities (i.e., Nurture). In addition, Superman has traditionally no need for physical weapons, instead using his aforementioned Kryptonian powers, while Cap's Captain America's WeaponOfChoice is his [[LuckilyMyShieldWillProtectMe trademark shield]]. While Superman is an alien who often feels alone on Earth as the LastOfHisKind, Captain America sometimes feels out of his time, being a World War II veteran in modern society. Superman's {{Archenemy}} ComicBook/LexLuthor is often portrayed as an American capitalist who uses his [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney wealth]] and [[VillainWithGoodPublicity influence]], while Captain America's {{Archenemy}} the ComicBook/RedSkull is a literal Nazi reviled by [[EvenEvilHasStandards all but like-minded individuals]].



** Superman and ComicBook/SpiderMan are both iconic urban superheroes known for their distinctive [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue costumes]], and for wearing glasses and working at newspapers in their civilian identities; both of them also have [[CorruptCorporateExecutive evil corporate CEOs]] as their archenemies. But Superman is known for his raw strength and his brawny physique, and he's often thematically associated with the heavens due to his [[FlyingBrick flight powers]] and [[HumanAlien alien heritage]]. Spider-Man, on the other hand, is known for his agility and his wiry physique, and most depictions emphasize his closeness to the Earth due to his [[WorkingClassHero humble background]] and [[AnimalThemedSuperBeing insect motif]]. The Daily Planet is also traditionally portrayed sympathetically, with its reporters being crusading idealists driven to protect the truth, while the Daily Bugle is cast in a more morally ambiguous light, with J. Jonah Jameson's editorials [[HeroWithBadPublicity ruining Spidey's reputation]]. Superman's nemesis Lex Luthor is also typically portrayed as a humanist scientific genius [[BadassNormal who can hold his own against superheroes with nothing but wits and gadgetry]]; by contrast, Spider-Man's nemesis ComicBook/NormanOsborn is usually portrayed as just a shrewd businessman who attempts to use science to transcend his human limitations, and ends up adopting a monstrous alter ego cloaked in supernatural trappings.

to:

** Superman and ComicBook/SpiderMan are both iconic urban superheroes known for their distinctive [[PrimaryColorChampion red and blue costumes]], and for wearing glasses and working at newspapers in their civilian identities; both of them also have [[CorruptCorporateExecutive evil corporate CEOs]] as their archenemies. But Superman is known for his raw strength and his brawny physique, and he's often thematically associated with the heavens due to his [[FlyingBrick flight powers]] and [[HumanAlien alien heritage]]. Spider-Man, on the other hand, is known for his agility and his wiry physique, and most depictions emphasize his closeness to the Earth due to his [[WorkingClassHero humble background]] and [[AnimalThemedSuperBeing insect motif]]. The Daily Planet is also traditionally portrayed sympathetically, with its reporters being crusading idealists driven to protect the truth, while the Daily Bugle is cast in a more morally ambiguous light, with J. Jonah Jameson's editorials [[HeroWithBadPublicity ruining Spidey's reputation]]. Superman's nemesis Lex Luthor ComicBook/LexLuthor is also typically portrayed as a humanist scientific genius [[BadassNormal who can hold his own against superheroes with nothing but wits and gadgetry]]; by contrast, Spider-Man's nemesis ComicBook/NormanOsborn is usually portrayed as just a shrewd businessman who attempts to use science to transcend his human limitations, and ends up adopting a monstrous alter ego cloaked in supernatural trappings.

Added DiffLines:

* ComicBook/MarvelNoir and ComicBook/Marvel1602 can be considered this to ComicBook/Marvel2099, Marvel 1602 especially. Marvel 2099 thrust the heroes of the Marvel universe into the far future, treated the present-day stories as canonical and important to the overarching metanarrative, and had a cyberpunk motif and themes. The Noir and 1602 [[TheVerse Verses]] are both set in a distant past (around Prohibition era and the age of exploration, respectively). They have more of a Steampunk (or perhaps [[CaptainObvious noir]]) feel to them, and don't treat the current-day stories as canon (except in the case of 1602... [[StableTimeLoop it's complicated.]] Marvel Noir shares 2099's pessimistic atmosphere, but unlike it, doesn't have the heroes sharing a single, cohesive world, whereas Marvel 1602 is set in a single [[TheVerse 'verse]] and is much more optimistic.


* Robert Kirkman's two most well-known and acclaimed creator-owned works are ''ComicBook/{{Invincible}}'' and ''ComicBook/TheWalkingDead'', both stand in stark contrast to each other outside the use of {{Gorn}}. The former is a colorful, LighterAndSofter story about larger-than-life superheroes, and served to be a {{Reconstruction}} of the superhero genre for Creator/ImageComics (in the past known for Dark Age excess). The latter is a grim, DarkerAndEdgier tale set AfterTheEnd, and tells its story of a ZombieApocalypse with unnerving realism, which served to break Image ''away'' from being exclusively about superheroes. Notably, this contrast is highlighted by color scheme. While the former is very bright and vibrant, as befitting of American superheroes, the latter is entirely in black and white, reflecting the nature of the story.

to:

* Robert Kirkman's two most well-known and acclaimed creator-owned works are ''ComicBook/{{Invincible}}'' and ''ComicBook/TheWalkingDead'', both stand in stark contrast to each other outside the use of {{Gorn}}. The former ''Invincible'' is a colorful, LighterAndSofter story about larger-than-life superheroes, and served to be a {{Reconstruction}} of the superhero genre for Creator/ImageComics (in the past known for Dark Age excess). The latter ''The Walking Dead'' is a grim, DarkerAndEdgier tale set AfterTheEnd, and tells its story of a ZombieApocalypse with unnerving realism, which served to break Image ''away'' from being exclusively about superheroes. Notably, this contrast is highlighted by color scheme. While the former is very bright and vibrant, as befitting of American superheroes, the latter is entirely in black and white, reflecting the nature of the story.

Added DiffLines:

* Robert Kirkman's two most well-known and acclaimed creator-owned works are ''ComicBook/{{Invincible}}'' and ''ComicBook/TheWalkingDead'', both stand in stark contrast to each other outside the use of {{Gorn}}. The former is a colorful, LighterAndSofter story about larger-than-life superheroes, and served to be a {{Reconstruction}} of the superhero genre for Creator/ImageComics (in the past known for Dark Age excess). The latter is a grim, DarkerAndEdgier tale set AfterTheEnd, and tells its story of a ZombieApocalypse with unnerving realism, which served to break Image ''away'' from being exclusively about superheroes. Notably, this contrast is highlighted by color scheme. While the former is very bright and vibrant, as befitting of American superheroes, the latter is entirely in black and white, reflecting the nature of the story.


* The creators of ''ComicBook/{{Cerebus}}'' and ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}'' got into an infamous feud during the books' runs. It makes sense, then, that their books can be considered antithesis to each other - both are black and white fantasy stories, incredibly long-running, and feature a title character that [[GenreREfugee he'd belong in a much more lighthearted book]]. But, ''Bone'' is a wholesome comic, with the hero being a goofy, kind-hearted guy, and the fantasy world is a classic HighFantasy culture, while Cerebus features a HeroicSociopath, living in a violent dystopia full of corruption, and is known for its [[CerebusSyndrome descent into seriousness]].

to:

* The creators of ''ComicBook/{{Cerebus}}'' and ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}'' got into an infamous feud during the books' runs. It makes sense, then, that their books can be considered antithesis to each other - both are black and white fantasy stories, incredibly long-running, and feature a title character that [[GenreREfugee [[GenreRefugee he'd belong in a much more lighthearted book]]. But, ''Bone'' is a wholesome comic, with the hero being a goofy, kind-hearted guy, and the fantasy world is a classic HighFantasy culture, while Cerebus features a HeroicSociopath, SociopathicHero, living in a violent dystopia full of corruption, and is known for its [[CerebusSyndrome descent into seriousness]].

Showing 15 edit(s) of 30

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report