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* ''ComicBook/FrankMillersRoboCop'', based on Creator/FrankMiller's original ''Film/RoboCop2'' script, not only features ''Mediabreak'' but also the talk shows ''The Luke Spindle Show'' and ''Lilac'', the respective eponymous hosts being a homophobic and misogynistic SmarmyHost and a transgendered woman. The latter show is also used to introduce Margaret Love, the character who'd become ''2'''s Juliette Faxx.

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* ''ComicBook/FrankMillersRoboCop'', based on Creator/FrankMiller's original ''Film/RoboCop2'' script, not only features ''Mediabreak'' ''[=MediaBreak=]'' but also the talk shows ''The Luke Spindle Show'' and ''Lilac'', the respective eponymous hosts being a homophobic and misogynistic SmarmyHost and a transgendered woman. The latter show is also used to introduce Margaret Love, the character who'd become ''2'''s Juliette Faxx.


* ''ComicBook/FrankMillersRoboCop, based on Creator/FrankMiller's original ''Film/RoboCop2'' script, not only features ''Mediabreak'' but also the talk shows ''The Luke Spindle Show'' and ''Lilac'', the respective eponymous hosts being a homophobic and misogynistic SmarmyHost and a transgendered woman. The latter show is also used to introduce Margaret Love, the character who'd become ''2'''s Juliette Faxx.

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* ''ComicBook/FrankMillersRoboCop, ''ComicBook/FrankMillersRoboCop'', based on Creator/FrankMiller's original ''Film/RoboCop2'' script, not only features ''Mediabreak'' but also the talk shows ''The Luke Spindle Show'' and ''Lilac'', the respective eponymous hosts being a homophobic and misogynistic SmarmyHost and a transgendered woman. The latter show is also used to introduce Margaret Love, the character who'd become ''2'''s Juliette Faxx.

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* ''ComicBook/FrankMillersRoboCop, based on Creator/FrankMiller's original ''Film/RoboCop2'' script, not only features ''Mediabreak'' but also the talk shows ''The Luke Spindle Show'' and ''Lilac'', the respective eponymous hosts being a homophobic and misogynistic SmarmyHost and a transgendered woman. The latter show is also used to introduce Margaret Love, the character who'd become ''2'''s Juliette Faxx.


* SpiderMan's former wife Mary Jane was an actress in a soap opera called ''Secret Hospital'' for a while. (Her character's name was "Sybil Shane" and from what we saw of the show - which was very little - her character seemed to be a vixen of sorts, and the show pretty much had every soap opera stereotype included.)

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* SpiderMan's ComicBook/SpiderMan's former wife Mary Jane was an actress in a soap opera called ''Secret Hospital'' for a while. (Her character's name was "Sybil Shane" and from what we saw of the show - which was very little - her character seemed to be a vixen of sorts, and the show pretty much had every soap opera stereotype included.)



** While some heroes, like the aforementioned She-Hulk and Fantastic Four, are public figures in the Marvel Universe, others, like Franchise/SpiderMan or ComicBook/{{Daredevil}}, aren't about to spill their secret identities on newsstands, so their comics-within-a-comic are only accurate as far as the superheroics go, and make up the heroes' personal lives and origin stories out of whole cloth.

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** While some heroes, like the aforementioned She-Hulk and Fantastic Four, are public figures in the Marvel Universe, others, like Franchise/SpiderMan ComicBook/SpiderMan or ComicBook/{{Daredevil}}, aren't about to spill their secret identities on newsstands, so their comics-within-a-comic are only accurate as far as the superheroics go, and make up the heroes' personal lives and origin stories out of whole cloth.


* Johnny C., the crazy main character of ''ComicBook/JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'', draws a comic book that is the next "level" of insanity: ''[[TalkativeLoons Happy Noodle Boy]]''.

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* Johnny C., the crazy main character of ''ComicBook/JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'', draws a comic book that is the next "level" of insanity: ''[[TalkativeLoons ''[[TalkativeLoon Happy Noodle Boy]]''.


* ''{{ComicBook/Transmetropolitan}} contains three examples of TV-shows about the protagonist, gonzo journalist Spider Jerusalem: {{Animesque}} edutainment show ''[[AdjectiveNounFred Magical Truthsaying Bastard Spidey]]'', a nameless overblown action-thriller showing a hilariously Hollywood-ized version of the events of the first album, and a PornParody titled "I Hump It Here". It is worth mentioning that while Spider (or rather, a in various ways heavily Flanderized version of Spider) is the protagonist of all these shows, he was not actually involved in the production, and is distraught at the idea of "becoming television".

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* ''{{ComicBook/Transmetropolitan}} ''{{ComicBook/Transmetropolitan}}'' contains three examples of TV-shows about the protagonist, gonzo journalist Spider Jerusalem: {{Animesque}} edutainment show ''[[AdjectiveNounFred Magical Truthsaying Bastard Spidey]]'', a nameless overblown action-thriller showing a hilariously Hollywood-ized version of the events of the first album, and a PornParody titled "I Hump It Here". It is worth mentioning that while Spider (or rather, a in various ways heavily Flanderized version of Spider) is the protagonist of all these shows, he was not actually involved in the production, and is distraught at the idea of "becoming television".


* ''{{ComicBook/Transmetropolitan}} contains no less than three examples: {{Animesque}} edutainment show ''[[AdjectiveNounFred Magical Truthsaying Bastard Spidey]]'', a nameless overblown action-thriller showing a hilariously Flanderized version of the events of the first album, and a PornParody titled "I Hump It Here". Spider is distraught at the idea of "becoming television".

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* ''{{ComicBook/Transmetropolitan}} contains no less than three examples: examples of TV-shows about the protagonist, gonzo journalist Spider Jerusalem: {{Animesque}} edutainment show ''[[AdjectiveNounFred Magical Truthsaying Bastard Spidey]]'', a nameless overblown action-thriller showing a hilariously Flanderized Hollywood-ized version of the events of the first album, and a PornParody titled "I Hump It Here". It is worth mentioning that while Spider (or rather, a in various ways heavily Flanderized version of Spider) is the protagonist of all these shows, he was not actually involved in the production, and is distraught at the idea of "becoming television".



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* ''{{ComicBook/Transmetropolitan}} contains no less than three examples: {{Animesque}} edutainment show ''[[AdjectiveNounFred Magical Truthsaying Bastard Spidey]]'', a nameless overblown action-thriller showing a hilariously Flanderized version of the events of the first album, and a PornParody titled "I Hump It Here". Spider is distraught at the idea of "becoming television".


* As part of his ''ComicBook/UltimateIronMan'' mini-series for Marvel Comics' Main/UltimateUniverse, Orson Scott Card had Tony Stark's entire flesh mutated into neural tissue while in womb due to an accident, which also granted him regenerative abilities. This reimagining of the character was considered so off-the-wall that it was retconned out of the Ultimate Universe's continuity, establishing instead that the events from ''Ultimate Iron Man'' were part of a pseudobiographical cartoon of the same name produced by Tony Stark himself. The cartoon was extremely successful, being sold in eighty-seven territories and getting tons of merchandise.

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* As part of his ''ComicBook/UltimateIronMan'' mini-series for Marvel Comics' Main/UltimateUniverse, Orson Scott Card Creator/OrsonScottCard had Tony Stark's entire flesh mutated into neural tissue while in womb due to an accident, which also granted him regenerative abilities. This reimagining of the character was considered so off-the-wall that all other Iron Man stories in the Ultimate universe resolved to ignore it was entirely, and eventually Creator/MarkMillar officially retconned it out of the Ultimate Universe's continuity, establishing instead that the events from ''Ultimate Iron Man'' were part of a pseudobiographical cartoon of the same name produced by Tony Stark himself. The cartoon was extremely successful, being sold in eighty-seven territories and getting tons of merchandise.


* In the ''COmicBook/SuperMarioBros'' comic books, Mario is a huge fan of comic-book-within-a-comic-book ''Dirk Drain-Head'', which is hated by the other good guys (including Luigi, who ironically looks exactly like Dirk), but loved also by Bowser's minions.

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* In the ''COmicBook/SuperMarioBros'' ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' comic books, Mario is a huge fan of comic-book-within-a-comic-book ''Dirk Drain-Head'', which is hated by the other good guys (including Luigi, who ironically looks exactly like Dirk), but loved also by Bowser's minions.


* In the comic book ''ComicBook/YoungJustice'', the characters watched a TV show called ''Wendy the Werewolf Stalker'', a parody of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''. This eventually became a Type 3 for a couple of issues when Cissie King-Jones (Arrowette) guest-starred in an episode after becoming famous during the [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Sydney Summer Games]]. This show is also brought up in 'ComicBook/{{Superboy|1994}}'' and ''ComicBook/{{Robin|Series}}'' since Kon, Tim and Stephanie are fans.

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* In the comic book ''ComicBook/YoungJustice'', the characters watched a TV show called ''Wendy the Werewolf Stalker'', a parody of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''. This eventually became a Type 3 for a couple of issues when Cissie King-Jones (Arrowette) guest-starred in an episode after becoming famous during the [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Sydney Summer Games]]. This show is also brought up in 'ComicBook/{{Superboy|1994}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Superboy|1994}}'' and ''ComicBook/{{Robin|Series}}'' since Kon, Tim and Stephanie are fans.



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* ''ComicBook/Superboy1994'': Superboy, Dubbilex, Tana, Roxy and Rex watch the pilot of a Superboy cartoon Rex Leech had made. Tana correctly predicts that no-one will pick it up for syndication and Superboy and the rest make a few snide comments about the fact that the show made Rex the main character, and made him much more upright, better looking and likeable than the real Rex.



* In the comic book ''ComicBook/YoungJustice'', the characters watched a TV show called ''Wendy the Werewolf Stalker'', a parody of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''. This eventually became a Type 3 for a couple of issues when Cissie King-Jones (Arrowette) guest-starred in an episode after becoming famous during the [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Sydney Summer Games]].

to:

* In the comic book ''ComicBook/YoungJustice'', the characters watched a TV show called ''Wendy the Werewolf Stalker'', a parody of ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''. This eventually became a Type 3 for a couple of issues when Cissie King-Jones (Arrowette) guest-starred in an episode after becoming famous during the [[UsefulNotes/OlympicGames Sydney Summer Games]]. This show is also brought up in 'ComicBook/{{Superboy|1994}}'' and ''ComicBook/{{Robin|Series}}'' since Kon, Tim and Stephanie are fans.


* As of the latest volume of her series (Mighty Captain Marvel 2017), [[ComicBook/MsMarvel Carol Danvers]] has been saddled with one of these. In a disbelief-straining setup, she's been told that the production of the loathsome fictionalized TV show about her, "Cap'n Marvel," is vitally important to funding her Alpha Flight team. Thus she's forced to be a technical advisor and even allow the show to film on her space station. This concept seems to be a CreatorsPet for author Margaret Stohl, who vastly overestimates both the novelty of the premise and the quality of the humor she mines out of it.

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* As of the latest volume of her series (Mighty (''Mighty Captain Marvel Marvel'', from 2017), [[ComicBook/MsMarvel Carol Danvers]] has been saddled with one of these. In a disbelief-straining setup, she's been told that the production of the loathsome fictionalized TV show about her, "Cap'n Marvel," "''Cap'n Marvel''," is vitally important to funding her Alpha Flight team. Thus she's forced to be a technical advisor and even allow the show to film on her space station. This concept seems to be a CreatorsPet for author Margaret Stohl, who vastly overestimates both the novelty of the premise and the quality of the humor she mines out of it.it.
* As part of his ''ComicBook/UltimateIronMan'' mini-series for Marvel Comics' Main/UltimateUniverse, Orson Scott Card had Tony Stark's entire flesh mutated into neural tissue while in womb due to an accident, which also granted him regenerative abilities. This reimagining of the character was considered so off-the-wall that it was retconned out of the Ultimate Universe's continuity, establishing instead that the events from ''Ultimate Iron Man'' were part of a pseudobiographical cartoon of the same name produced by Tony Stark himself. The cartoon was extremely successful, being sold in eighty-seven territories and getting tons of merchandise.

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* One issue of ''ComicBook/{{Xombi}}'' opens with the cast discussing a film they just saw - which, based on the plot and cast details mentioned, is 'Habeas Corpus', the film within a film from ''Film/ThePlayer''.

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* As of the latest volume of her series (Mighty Captain Marvel 2017), [[ComicBook/MsMarvel Carol Danvers]] has been saddled with one of these. In a disbelief-straining setup, she's been told that the production of the loathsome fictionalized TV show about her, "Cap'n Marvel," is vitally important to funding her Alpha Flight team. Thus she's forced to be a technical advisor and even allow the show to film on her space station. This concept seems to be a CreatorsPet for author Margaret Stohl, who vastly overestimates both the novelty of the premise and the quality of the humor she mines out of it.

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