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** LovelyAssistant: The secondary co-hosts who only reviewed movies & albums, or provided the V&A Updates, though they were generally billed equally as part of the "V&A Crew"

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** LovelyAssistant: The secondary co-hosts who only reviewed movies & albums, or provided the V&A Updates, though they were generally billed equally as part of the "V&A Crew"Crew." Nicholas Picholas started off here in season 1, doing the music reviews.


* CarriedByTheHost: Nicholas Picholas and V&A Top 10 go hand in hand for many 1990s kids in Canada, especially as he lasted the show's entire 15 year run. None of his co-hosts came anywhere close to that.

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* CarriedByTheHost: Nicholas Picholas and V&A Top 10 go hand in hand for many 1990s kids in Canada, especially as he lasted the show's entire 15 year run.run, 14 of those years as it's main host. None of his co-hosts came anywhere close to that.



** GameShowHost: Nicholas Picholas ([[StageNames is that his real name?]]) and the various co-hosts that rarely lasted more than a couple of seasons

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** GameShowHost: Gordon Michael Woolvett (a.k.a. Gord the PJ Man) in season 1, Nicholas Picholas ([[StageNames is that his real name?]]) thereafter, and the various co-hosts that rarely lasted more than a couple of seasons


Added DiffLines:

* AscendedExtra: Nicholas Picholas was just the music review host in the first season. When Gordon left, he was promoted to hosting duties, and is far more recognized for his involvement with ''V&A Top 10'' today.


Added DiffLines:

* LighterAndSofter: In a 2016 interview with Vice, Nicholas admitted that games featured in later seasons were intentionally E-rated, child-geared titles that were "less stabby", as new mainstream video games became more violent and the internet became more widespread.


* TransAtlanticEquivalent: ''Series/NickArcade'', which began taping in the fall of 1991, shortly after ''V&A'' debuted. While ''Nick Arcade'' was only on the air on Nickelodeon in the United Stares for two seasons (and didn't air in Canada at all), it was formatted more like a full game show, themed entirely around video games save for the trivia, and featured running commentary during video game play itself.

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* TransAtlanticEquivalent: ''Series/NickArcade'', which began taping in the fall of 1991, shortly after ''V&A'' debuted. While ''Nick Arcade'' was only on the air on Nickelodeon in the United Stares States for two seasons (and didn't air in Canada at all), it was formatted more like a full game show, themed entirely around video games save for the trivia, and featured running commentary during video game play itself.

Added DiffLines:

* TransAtlanticEquivalent: ''Series/NickArcade'', which began taping in the fall of 1991, shortly after ''V&A'' debuted. While ''Nick Arcade'' was only on the air on Nickelodeon in the United Stares for two seasons (and didn't air in Canada at all), it was formatted more like a full game show, themed entirely around video games save for the trivia, and featured running commentary during video game play itself.


* ConsolationPrize: In the later seasons, passes to the Medieval Times restaurant in Toronto for second place contestants, and Video & Arcade Top 10 t-shirts for the third & fourth place contestants
* GameShowWinningsCap: While V&A Top 10 (like most kids game shows) didn't have returning champions, there have been contestants who have been on the show on multiple separate occasions. For example, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3r0ffe17qcc this kid]] was on the show three times, winning twice.

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* ConsolationPrize: In the later seasons, passes to the Medieval Times restaurant in Toronto for second place contestants, and Video ''Video & Arcade Top 10 10'' t-shirts for the third & fourth place contestants
* GameShowWinningsCap: While V&A ''V&A Top 10 10'' (like most kids game shows) didn't have returning champions, there have been contestants who have been on the show on multiple separate occasions. For example, [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3r0ffe17qcc this kid]] was on the show three times, winning twice.



* LongRunners: In terms of both Canadian game shows and children's game shows, V&A Top 10's 15 year run definitely counts. You could probably count on one hand examples of each that lasted 15 consecutive years without being cancelled in between. Though unheralded as such at the time of it's cancellation, V&A was YTV's longest running original series (and it still is, if you don't count YTV's ''The Zone'' programming block as a show.)



* QuietlyPerformingSisterShow: Clips, another Robert Essery Organization-produced kids game show that aired on YTV from 1993-1996. It featured similar prizes and home viewer contests as V&A (along with sharing some co-hosts from that era), but it's format was based around trivia questions culled from video clips.
* RevolvingDoorCasting: Nicholas aside, V&A Top 10 swapped out co-hosts very frequently, with few lasting more than a couple of seasons.

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* QuietlyPerformingSisterShow: Clips, ''Clips'', another Robert Essery Organization-produced kids game show that aired on YTV from 1993-1996. It featured similar prizes and home viewer contests as V&A ''V&A'' (along with sharing some co-hosts from that era), but it's format was based around trivia questions culled from video clips.
* RevolvingDoorCasting: Nicholas aside, V&A ''V&A'' Top 10 swapped out co-hosts very frequently, with few lasting more than a couple of seasons.



* StatusQuoIsGod: Aside from the co-hosts, on-screen graphics, and newer games, very little changed about Video & Arcade Top 10 from season to season, and the set basically looked the same in 1991 as it did in 2006.
** Even with upgrades to what games were played over time, V&A Top 10 episodes tended to feature games that weren't newly released at the time of filming, and it was common in later seasons for contestants to play games a few years old without trying to stay current to newer game releases. In fact, the last game played on air ([=X2=]: Wolverine's Revenge for the Game Boy Advance) came out in ''2003''.

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* StatusQuoIsGod: Aside from the co-hosts, on-screen graphics, and newer games, very little changed about Video ''Video & Arcade Top 10 10'' from season to season, and the set basically looked the same in 1991 as it did in 2006.
** Even with upgrades to what games were played over time, V&A ''V&A Top 10 10'' episodes tended to feature games that weren't newly released at the time of filming, and it was common in later seasons for contestants to play games a few years old without trying to stay current to newer game releases. In fact, the last game played on air ([=X2=]: Wolverine's Revenge for the Game Boy Advance) came out in ''2003''.


Children's GameShow on Creator/{{YTV}} that lasted from 1991-2006. Two groups of four contestants played against each other at simultaneous single player modes of a video game (generally from Creator/{{Nintendo}} consoles, {{Sony}} on occasion), with the highest scoring one moving on to the Top 10 Bonus Wall, where they would pull a ball out of a drum to randomly pick a grand prize. Additional segments aired each week that profiled other video games and new home movies & [=CDs=], with a heavy dose of home viewer giveaways and contests for good measure. A fond memory for many 1990s kids in Canada, it's one of the very few English-language Canadian game shows to last 15 years on the air in first run. Reruns have aired on the Canadian cable channel [=GameTV=] in the early 2010s.

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Children's GameShow on Creator/{{YTV}} that lasted from 1991-2006. Two groups of four contestants played against each other at simultaneous single player modes of a video game (generally from Creator/{{Nintendo}} consoles, {{Sony}} Creator/{{Sony}} on occasion), with the highest scoring one moving on to the Top 10 Bonus Wall, where they would pull a ball out of a drum to randomly pick a grand prize. Additional segments aired each week that profiled other video games and new home movies & [=CDs=], with a heavy dose of home viewer giveaways and contests for good measure. A fond memory for many 1990s kids in Canada, it's one of the very few English-language Canadian game shows to last 15 years on the air in first run. Reruns have aired on the Canadian cable channel [=GameTV=] in the early 2010s.


Children's [[GameShow game show]] on Creator/{{YTV}} that lasted from 1991-2006. Two groups of four contestants played against each other at simultaneous single player modes of a video game (generally from Creator/{{Nintendo}} consoles, {{Sony}} on occasion), with the highest scoring one moving on to the Top 10 Bonus Wall, where they would pull a ball out of a drum to randomly pick a grand prize. Additional segments aired each week that profiled other video games and new home movies & [=CDs=], with a heavy dose of home viewer giveaways and contests for good measure. A fond memory for many 1990s kids in Canada, it's one of the very few English-language Canadian game shows to last 15 years on the air in first run. Reruns have aired on the Canadian cable channel [=GameTV=] in the early 2010s.

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Children's [[GameShow game show]] GameShow on Creator/{{YTV}} that lasted from 1991-2006. Two groups of four contestants played against each other at simultaneous single player modes of a video game (generally from Creator/{{Nintendo}} consoles, {{Sony}} on occasion), with the highest scoring one moving on to the Top 10 Bonus Wall, where they would pull a ball out of a drum to randomly pick a grand prize. Additional segments aired each week that profiled other video games and new home movies & [=CDs=], with a heavy dose of home viewer giveaways and contests for good measure. A fond memory for many 1990s kids in Canada, it's one of the very few English-language Canadian game shows to last 15 years on the air in first run. Reruns have aired on the Canadian cable channel [=GameTV=] in the early 2010s.



!!GameShow Tropes in use:

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!!GameShow Tropes !!GameShowTropes in use:


* TechnologyMarchesOn: It's hard to believe that the same show launched with {{Super Nintendo}} games in it's gameplay rounds, and ended with {{Nintendo Gamecube}} & {{Game Boy Advance}} games, all without a major change to the show's format.


Children's [[GameShow game show]] on {{YTV}} that lasted from 1991-2006. Two groups of four contestants played against each other at simultaneous single player modes of a video game (generally from Creator/{{Nintendo}} consoles, {{Sony}} on occasion), with the highest scoring one moving on to the Top 10 Bonus Wall, where they would pull a ball out of a drum to randomly pick a grand prize. Additional segments aired each week that profiled other video games and new home movies & [=CDs=], with a heavy dose of home viewer giveaways and contests for good measure. A fond memory for many 1990s kids in Canada, it's one of the very few English-language Canadian game shows to last 15 years on the air in first run. Reruns have aired on the Canadian cable channel [=GameTV=] in the early 2010s.

to:

Children's [[GameShow game show]] on {{YTV}} Creator/{{YTV}} that lasted from 1991-2006. Two groups of four contestants played against each other at simultaneous single player modes of a video game (generally from Creator/{{Nintendo}} consoles, {{Sony}} on occasion), with the highest scoring one moving on to the Top 10 Bonus Wall, where they would pull a ball out of a drum to randomly pick a grand prize. Additional segments aired each week that profiled other video games and new home movies & [=CDs=], with a heavy dose of home viewer giveaways and contests for good measure. A fond memory for many 1990s kids in Canada, it's one of the very few English-language Canadian game shows to last 15 years on the air in first run. Reruns have aired on the Canadian cable channel [=GameTV=] in the early 2010s.


* HeyItsThatGuy: Though it'd be easy to bypass or forget about Nicholas' array of co-hosts over V&A Top 10's run, a few turned up in more prominent later roles. Notably, both Gordon Michael Woolvett & Lexa Doig had roles on Gene Roddenberry's {{Andromeda}}, and Liza Fromer now co-hosts The Morning Show on the {{Global Television Network}}
** Some V&A Top 10 co-hosts also served as YTV PJs ("program jockeys") featured on other original programs in the early seasons, but by the end of it's run, co-hosts didn't tend to pop up on other YTV shows.
* HeyItsThatVoice: Regional example, as Toronto-area viewers and fans may recognize Nicholas Picholas as a radio DJ and morning show host on Kiss 98.5 FM out of nearby Buffalo, New York. [[http://kiss985.com/Hosts/5673303#Nicholas In fact, he's still there!]] Outside of the Toronto area though, fans will likely know him first from V&A.



* KeepCirculatingTheTapes: V&A Top 10 has never had a home video release, likely due to the use of licensed video games, music videos, and movies from other companies (though to be fair, few YTV original series have been put out on DVD.) With [=GameTV=] no longer airing repeats, your best bet to watch episodes is either on {{YouTube}} or through tape trading.



* NoBudget: The prize budget alone is proof of this (sponsored or not), as individual prizes were only rarely more expensive than a game being played that week (They did give away a ton of small prizes through home viewer contests though.)



* OfficialFanSubmittedContent: Letter Time, where Nicholas Picholas read one letter a week from a fan (usually with their name, age, and favourite games & consoles), and a game played that week was sent to them as a prize. Past letters read during Letter Time were stuck on the wall behind where Nicholas taped this segment



* WhatCouldHaveBeen: Had V&A Top 10 lasted into the 2006-2007 season, it would have been airing new episodes during the timeframe of the {{Wii}}'s launch, but it was cancelled before we could see contestants compete against each other at Wii games.
** The show never featured {{Virtual Boy}} or {{Nintendo DS}} games on air either (even though both were launched during the show's run), likely because neither had a TV peripheral like the Super Game Boy or the Wide Boy 64 to facilitate them.


* LongRunners: In terms of both Canadian game shows and children's game shows, V&A Top 10's 15 year run definitely counts. You could probably count on one hand examples of each that lasted 15 consecutive years without being cancelled in between. At the time of it's cancellation, it was YTV's longest running current original series.

to:

* LongRunners: In terms of both Canadian game shows and children's game shows, V&A Top 10's 15 year run definitely counts. You could probably count on one hand examples of each that lasted 15 consecutive years without being cancelled in between. At Though unheralded as such at the time of it's cancellation, it V&A was YTV's longest running current original series.series (and it still is, if you don't count YTV's ''The Zone'' programming block as a show.)


* LongRunners: In terms of both Canadian game shows and children's game shows, V&A Top 10's 15 year run definitely counts. You could probably count on one hand examples of each that lasted 15 consecutive years without being cancelled in between. At the time of it's cancellation, it was YTV's longest running original series.

to:

* LongRunners: In terms of both Canadian game shows and children's game shows, V&A Top 10's 15 year run definitely counts. You could probably count on one hand examples of each that lasted 15 consecutive years without being cancelled in between. At the time of it's cancellation, it was YTV's longest running current original series.


* AnnouncerChatter: Sort of, as Nicholas Picholas and his primary co-host spent the entirety of each round explaining ''how to play the game'' rather than commentate the action or remark on who's winning. As a device to help sell the game and explain the instructions to viewers, it works, but it didn't add anything to the game show aspect of this ''game show''.

to:

* AnnouncerChatter: Sort of, as Nicholas Picholas and his primary co-host spent the entirety of each round explaining ''how to play the game'' rather than commentate the action or remark on who's winning. As This worked as a device to help sell the game and explain the instructions to viewers, it works, but it didn't add anything to was atypical of the running commentary that might be expected for a game show aspect of this ''game show''.based around video games.


Added DiffLines:

* RevolvingDoorCasting: Nicholas aside, V&A Top 10 swapped out co-hosts very frequently, with few lasting more than a couple of seasons.


Children's [[GameShow game show]] on {{YTV}} that lasted from 1991-2006. Two groups of four contestants played against each other at simultaneous single player modes of a video game (generally from {{Nintendo}} consoles, {{Sony}} on occasion), with the highest scoring one moving on to the Top 10 Bonus Wall, where they would pull a ball out of a drum to randomly pick a grand prize. Additional segments aired each week that profiled other video games and new home movies & [=CDs=], with a heavy dose of home viewer giveaways and contests for good measure. A fond memory for many 1990s kids in Canada, it's one of the very few English-language Canadian game shows to last 15 years on the air in first run. Reruns have aired on the Canadian cable channel [=GameTV=] in the early 2010s.

to:

Children's [[GameShow game show]] on {{YTV}} that lasted from 1991-2006. Two groups of four contestants played against each other at simultaneous single player modes of a video game (generally from {{Nintendo}} Creator/{{Nintendo}} consoles, {{Sony}} on occasion), with the highest scoring one moving on to the Top 10 Bonus Wall, where they would pull a ball out of a drum to randomly pick a grand prize. Additional segments aired each week that profiled other video games and new home movies & [=CDs=], with a heavy dose of home viewer giveaways and contests for good measure. A fond memory for many 1990s kids in Canada, it's one of the very few English-language Canadian game shows to last 15 years on the air in first run. Reruns have aired on the Canadian cable channel [=GameTV=] in the early 2010s.


** The show never featured {{{Virtual Boy}} or {{Nintendo DS}} games on air either (even though both were launched during the show's run), likely because neither had a TV peripheral like the Super Game Boy or the Wide Boy 64 to facilitate it.

to:

** The show never featured {{{Virtual {{Virtual Boy}} or {{Nintendo DS}} games on air either (even though both were launched during the show's run), likely because neither had a TV peripheral like the Super Game Boy or the Wide Boy 64 to facilitate it.them.

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