Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Series / TheUltimateFighter

Go To



* {{Kayfabe}}: In ''TUF Brazil 3'', Chael gets openly annoyed that Wanderlei refuses to realize that Chael is just playing a heel and handing him the role of face. Wanderlei refuses to play along and tries to brawl with his perceived nemesis for real.



** Ken Shamrock accused the UFC of editing the show specifically to make him look bad. {{Genre Savvy}}
** Forrest Griffin attempted an interesting subversion of this by altering his look every few days so any manipulative editing would be more apparent. In the commentary on Season 1, he pointed out several instances where this is apparent just by him being in the background with different colored hair in the same sequence.
** In Season 12, some very suspicious editing was done with the confrontation between Josh Koscheck and the medic. On the show, Koscheck looked especially inconsiderate in his war of words that ended in him getting physical with the medic. However, the unedited version of the event on the UFC webpage showed that the medic had made some pretty low comments about one of Koscheck's fighters, including making fun of his English among other things. While it does not excuse Koscheck, it does paint him in a little better light, but given that he was being made out to be the bad guy of the show (not that he needed much help)...

to:

** Ken Shamrock accused the UFC of editing the show specifically to make him look bad.
**
{{Genre Savvy}}
**
Savvy}} Forrest Griffin attempted an interesting subversion of this by altering his look every few days so any manipulative editing would be more apparent. In the commentary on Season 1, he pointed out several instances where this is apparent just by him being in the background with different colored hair in the same sequence.
** In Season 12, some very suspicious editing was done with the confrontation between Josh Koscheck and the medic. On the show, Koscheck looked especially inconsiderate in his war of words that ended in him getting physical with the medic. However, the unedited version of the event on the UFC webpage showed that the medic had made some pretty low comments about one of Koscheck's fighters, including making fun of his English among other things. While it does not excuse Koscheck, it does paint him in a little better light, but given that he was being at least provide some insight into what is made out to be the bad guy of the show (not that he needed much help)...look like a completely unmotivated attack.



* MenDontCry:
** Many instances averted, but most famously Andy Wang, who bawled like a baby after losing his match, prompting his own coach, B.J. Penn, to make fun of him on national TV... and in fact, the episode title was "Waaaah!" This was, of course, after Penn yelled at the BJJ blackbelt the entire fight to go to the ground; Wang instead choosing to stand, bang, and lose. Penn later kicked Wang off his team, the first time this has ever happened.

to:

* MenDontCry:
**
MenDontCry: Many instances averted, but most fighters end up crying on the show. While this is sometimes played for drama, other times it becomes the subject of ridicule:
** Most
famously Andy Wang, who bawled like a baby after losing his match, prompting his own coach, B.J. Penn, to make fun of him on national TV... and in fact, the episode title was "Waaaah!" This was, of course, after Penn yelled at the BJJ blackbelt the entire fight to go to the ground; Wang instead choosing to stand, bang, and lose. Penn later kicked Wang off his team, the first time this has ever happened.



* MistakenForRacist: Matt Hughes claims this, after the uproar on the online forums when he made fun of Din Thomas' "big lips" in Season 4. Thomas is African American, and many found the comment racist. Matt insists it was just good-natured ribbing between friends.
** This is compounded with his singling out African American fighter Rashad Evans for showboating (See StopHavingFunGuys on YMMV) for no apparent reason in Season 2, and has made several public remarks over the years about his dislike for half-Mexican Tito Ortiz, who does not even fight in his weight class (although to be fair, it's ''Ortiz'' we are talking about, and Evans rubs a lot of people the wrong way), and recently culminated with pictures of him holding white supremacist paraphernalia (he claims he had no knowledge of the meanings of the symbols). Hughes is retired now and works for the UFC in Talent Relations, and this could jeapordize his job.

to:

* MistakenForRacist: MistakenForRacist:

**
Matt Hughes claims this, after the uproar on the online forums when he made fun of Din Thomas' "big lips" in Season 4. Thomas is African American, and many found the comment racist. Matt insists it was just good-natured ribbing between friends.
**
friends. This is compounded with his singling out African American fighter Rashad Evans for showboating (See StopHavingFunGuys on YMMV) for no apparent reason in Season 2, and has made several public remarks over the years about his dislike for half-Mexican Tito Ortiz, who does not even fight in his weight class (although to be fair, it's ''Ortiz'' we are talking about, and Evans rubs a lot of people the wrong way), and recently culminated with pictures of him holding white supremacist paraphernalia (he claims he had no knowledge 2. A few other questionable incidents outside of the meanings of the symbols). Hughes is retired now and works for the UFC in Talent Relations, and this could jeapordize his job.show have not helped matters.



* MyGreatestSecondChance: Season 25 revolved around bringing former TUF competitors back for another shot at making it to the UFC. In the end, Jesse Taylor, infamous for his Season 7 meltdown that cost him his spot in that season's finale, would defeat Dhiego Lima to finally earn his contract (though thanks to a drug test failure afterwards and unrelated to the fight, it remains to be seen whether he will truly be able to capitalize).

to:

* MyGreatestSecondChance: Season 25 revolved around bringing former TUF competitors back for another shot at making it to the UFC. In the end, Jesse Taylor, infamous for his Season 7 meltdown that cost him his spot in that season's finale, would defeat Dhiego Lima to finally earn his contract (though thanks contract. Unfortunately, he was never able to capitalize, as he was again booted from the promotion for failing a drug test failure afterwards and unrelated prior to the fight, it remains to be seen whether he will truly be able to capitalize). his very next bout.


* BrooklynRage: Matt Serra, sporting a thick Long Island accent, is very outgoing, opinionated and emotional. He's quick to get angry when his Gracie heroes are disparaged or when someone is being bullied. His feud with Matt Hughes was quite acrimonious.



** Jason Thacker during his brief time on Season 1.

to:

** Jason Thacker during his brief time on Season 1. He had his pillow urinated on by Chris Leben, who also saddled him with the mocking nickname "Film/StrangeBrew." He was kicked off the show before even being given the opportunity to fight, and later lost his one and only professional MMA fight against Leben in the show's finale.



** Gabe Ruediger in Season 5, for not taking the training seriously and B.J. Penn called him out in front of everyone for that. Later, Ruediger's butt monkey status elevates when he tried to cut weight, failed, and eventually passed out. White was not happy and Ruediger was completely out cast, literally.

to:

** Gabe Ruediger in Season 5, for not taking the training seriously and B.J. Penn called him out in front of everyone for that. Later, Ruediger's butt monkey status elevates when he tried to cut weight, failed, and eventually passed out. White was not happy and Ruediger was completely out cast, literally.kicked off the show.



* TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires: Subverted in Season 8, where during the coach's challenge we find out Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira is possibly the ''only'' Brazilian that doesn't know how to play soccer.

to:

* TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires: Subverted in Season 8, where during the coach's challenge we find out Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira is possibly the ''only'' Brazilian that who doesn't know how to play soccer.



** Rashad Evans, who fought at heavyweight, even through he is still undersized as a light heavyweight. He won the championship, won the LHW belt, and is widely considered the best fighter to ever come out of the show.

to:

** Rashad Evans, who fought at heavyweight, even through he is still undersized as a light heavyweight. He won the championship, won the LHW belt, and is widely considered one of the best fighter fighters to ever come out of the show.



** Amir Sadollah won Season 7 with an professional record of 0-0 and a very explicit inferiority complex. Most of his victories were come-from-behind submissions. He stated at the end of the show that if you had lined up all the men he fought on the show and told him to beat them all, he would have refused to fight.

to:

** Amir Sadollah won Season 7 with an professional record of 0-0 and a very explicit inferiority complex. Most of his victories were come-from-behind submissions. He stated at the end of the show that if you had lined up all the men he he'd fought on the show and told him to beat them all, he would have refused to fight.



** In Season 4, Jeremy Jackson was expelled from the house for hopping the fence at night (violating the show's rules) to meet a lifeguard.

to:

** In Season 4, Jeremy Jackson was expelled from the house for hopping the fence at night (violating the show's rules) to meet a lifeguard.woman.



* HairTriggerTemper: Matt Serra, who looks, sounds and acts like this trope's former name.
** Season 14's Diego Brandao, among other things, threatened to [[OffWithHisHead decapitate]] Marcus Brimage. After winning the season, he pledged to [[EvenBadMenLoveTheirMommas buy his mother a house]].

to:

* HairTriggerTemper: Matt Serra, who looks, sounds and acts like this trope's former name.
**
Season 14's Diego Brandao, among other things, threatened to [[OffWithHisHead decapitate]] Marcus Brimage. After winning the season, he pledged to [[EvenBadMenLoveTheirMommas buy his mother a house]].



** To some extent Kimbo Slice, who was hated by many hardcore MMA fans and most expected to come off bad on the show; however Slice was shown to be very humble and eager to learn, earning him a lot of respect for even doing the show.

to:

** To some extent Kimbo Slice, who was hated by many hardcore MMA fans fans, and most expected him to come off bad on the show; however Slice was shown to be very humble and eager to learn, earning him a lot of respect for even doing the show.



* InsurmountableWaistHeightFence: Fighters are forbidden to leave the house grounds. The only cast member who hopped the fence (for a midnight rendezvous) has been caught. He was immediately ejected from the show and blacklisted from the UFC. Hope it was worth it!
** Technically, Chris Leben did also in the first season. Soon after the famous incident with him destroying the house after being sprayed with a hose, he walked out of the house late one night to make a phone call from a pay phone. Inexplicably, he was never punished for it, and it was never addressed again after showing him walking out. One can only assume the producers were begging Dana to keep him on the show at this point (being the most exciting part of the show so far), plus the confusion of what to do in that kind of situation (it was the first season, they were stil figuring out what they were doing). Ever since then Dana has been firmly adamant on bouncing out rulebreakers (with only maybe Junie Browning coming close).

to:

* InsurmountableWaistHeightFence: Fighters are forbidden to leave the house grounds. The Chris Leben actually managed to leave the house without consequence during the first season, taking a walk to cool off and make a phone call. He wasn't punished, most likely because the show wasn't prepared to handle rules infractions, and the drama surrounding Leben was television gold. Since then, only cast one other member who hopped has been caught hopping the fence (for a midnight rendezvous) has been caught. He rendezvous), and he was immediately ejected from the show and blacklisted from the UFC. Hope it was worth it!
** Technically, Chris Leben did also in the first season. Soon after the famous incident with him destroying the house after being sprayed with a hose, he walked out of the house late one night to make a phone call from a pay phone. Inexplicably, he was never punished for it, and it was never addressed again after showing him walking out. One can only assume the producers were begging Dana to keep him on the show at this point (being the most exciting part of the show so far), plus the confusion of what to do in that kind of situation (it was the first season, they were stil figuring out what they were doing). Ever since then Dana has been firmly adamant on bouncing out rulebreakers (with only maybe Junie Browning coming close).
it!



** Tony Ferguson in Season 13 seemed like a tough, clean guy. After a minor confrontation at the house, he mocked Charlie Rader's difficulty with child support and how the man was unable to see his son. The episode was appropriately titled, "Then It Turned Ugly."

to:

** Tony Ferguson in Season 13 seemed like a tough, clean guy. After a minor confrontation at the house, he mocked Charlie Rader's difficulty with child support and how the man was unable to see his son. The episode was appropriately titled, "Then It Turned Ugly."" In his later career, Ferguson has managed to grow out of this reputation by becoming a very successful and fan-favorite scrapper who acknowledged that he's working through legitimate mental health issues.



* PimpedOutDress: Shonie Carter would often wear pimped-out dress, including a cane and pimp cup, during fighter assemblies, and spent a lot of time in the house making crafts.



** Matt Hughes losing to Matt Serra in bowling, which neither had any real experience in.
** The ping pong match between coaches B.J. Penn and Jens Pulver in Season 5. Pulver won, and Penn's anguished scream of denial was ''hilarious''.
** Ronda flipping off Meisha and gloating after winning an indoor rock climbing competition.

to:

** Matt Hughes losing to and Matt Serra in bowling, which neither had any real experience in.
bowling. Neither seemed to have ever bowled before, and both come across looking humorously awkward. Serra received some coaching from a team member and won the bout, though Hughes did manage a strike when called upon to double the fighters' bonus.
** The ping pong match between coaches B.J. Penn and Jens Pulver in Season 5. Pulver won, and Penn's anguished scream of denial was is ''hilarious''.
** Ronda flipping flips off Meisha and gloating gloats after winning an indoor rock climbing competition. The obviously miffed Meisha just congratulates her through tight lips.



* TookALevelInBadass: Several of the contestants on the show have gone on to become coaches, including Forrest Griffin, Rashad Evans, Matt Serra, Michael Bisping, Josh Koscheck and most recently, Roy Nelson.

to:

* TookALevelInBadass: TookALevelInBadass:
**
Several of the contestants on the show have gone on to become coaches, including Forrest Griffin, Rashad Evans, Matt Serra, Michael Bisping, Josh Koscheck and most recently, Roy Nelson.



* TheUnintelligible: Pretty much any time a British fighter is on the show. Starting from Ross Pointon and Michael Bisping in Season 3, a LOT of the Brits get subtitled in the US run of the show. Bisping's English/Cypriot accent was so hard for some people to understand, that a common joke among the fans was that it was easier to understand Matt Hamill, and he was deaf. This made Season 9, US vs. UK, into a reading assignment for many. During Team UK's preliminary fights, one a UK fighter jokingly asks, "Please don't subtitle me." They had to subtitle him. It's interesting to note that the Armenian-born fighter speaking American English with a foreign accent is not subtitled, but the native English speakers using British English are.

to:

* TheUnintelligible: Pretty much any time a British fighter is on the show. Starting from Ross Pointon and Michael Bisping in Season 3, a LOT of the Brits get subtitled in the US run of the show. Bisping's English/Cypriot Manchester accent was so hard for some people to understand, that a common joke among the fans was that it was easier to understand Matt Hamill, and he was deaf. This made Season 9, US vs. UK, into a reading assignment for many. During Team UK's preliminary fights, one a UK fighter jokingly asks, "Please don't subtitle me." They had to subtitle him. It's interesting to note that the Armenian-born fighter speaking American English with a foreign accent is not subtitled, but the native English speakers using British English are.


Most of the fighters are very inexperienced (some having no MMA record at all), although the first few seasons were full of fighters who were probably UFC bound anyways (no less than seven of the sixteen competitors in the first season fought for UFC titles). Occasionally a veteran of both the international scene or the UFC itself will make it onto the show (Mac Danzig, Roy Nelson, Wes Sims) or even Kimbo Slice, who is more famous for his YouTube backyard brawls than his formal MMA record.

to:

Most of the fighters are very inexperienced (some having no MMA record at all), although the first few seasons were full of fighters who were probably UFC bound anyways (no less than seven of the sixteen competitors in the first season fought for UFC titles). Occasionally a veteran of both the international scene or the UFC itself will make it onto the show (Mac Danzig, Roy Nelson, Wes Sims) or even Kimbo Slice, who is more famous for his YouTube Website/YouTube backyard brawls than his formal MMA record.


* OneOfUs: Season 2 finalist Luke Cummo is an aspiring comic book artist. Season 5 coach Jens Pulver is an avid PC gamer, particularly in ''World of Warcraft''. Season 6 winner Mac Danzig, an animal rights activist, photographer and a vegan. Season 10's Marcus Jones, despite looking like a {{Scary Black Man}}, is a sensitive soul who enjoys gardening and ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' (though mess with his friends and you may push his {{Berserk Button}}). Season 12 coach Georges St. Pierre is very into paleontology (and history!), and Cody McKenzie seems more of a hippy than a fighter. Season 18's Roxanne Modaferri began taking Tae Kwon Do lessons at 13 after watching ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers'' and ''Manga/DragonballZ'', and readily quotes from the Jedi Code.


The show, particularly the first season, is credited with revitalizing interest in the UFC following "the dark ages" of MMA in the US post John [=McCain=]'s crusade to have it banned following its brief popularity in the mid nineties. Particularly, the drama around Chris Leben and Josh Koscheck/Bobby Southworth and more importantly, the light heavyweight finale fight between Forrest Griffin and Stephan Bonnar, which peaked at around 15 million viewers at one point. Having a time slot right after ''Wrestling/WWEMondayNightRaw'' probably helped as well[[note]]Spike TV had to ask the WWE for permission to air it right after ''Raw'' and they granted it, unknowingly helping to create one of their biggest competitors on PPV[[/note]].

The show gets tweaked on a regular basis to avoid stagnation, with varying degrees of success. Early seasons used a team challenge to decide which team chose the next fight, a concept that was dropped by season 4 in favor of the fight winner's team choosing. Later seasons had a tournament just to get into the house, which proved somewhat popular, although it was dropped for season 10, most likely due to Kimbo Slice's presence (but has returned for Season 11 and on, but dropped again for Season 13 due to the season [[ScrewedByTheNetwork]] being shorter than normal]]). It was also dropped for the 20th US season due to the championship being at stake and the 16 contestants already being considered the best in the world at their weight class (and will also be absent from the 21st due to the gym vs. gym dynamic). Season 4's experiment with veteran UFC fighters proved a miserable failure, with wily vets putting on boring fights trying to ensure they were healthy enough to continue to the next bracket. Season 17 changed the filming style considerably, with the show now resembling a serious film-shot documentary.

to:

The show, particularly the first season, is credited with revitalizing interest in the UFC following "the dark ages" of MMA in the US post John [=McCain=]'s crusade to have it banned following its brief popularity in the mid nineties. Particularly, the drama around Chris Leben and Josh Koscheck/Bobby Southworth and more importantly, the light heavyweight finale fight between Forrest Griffin and Stephan Bonnar, which peaked at around 15 million viewers at one point. Having a time slot right after ''Wrestling/WWEMondayNightRaw'' ''Wrestling/WWERaw'' probably helped as well[[note]]Spike TV had to ask the WWE for permission to air it right after ''Raw'' and they granted it, unknowingly helping to create one of their biggest competitors on PPV[[/note]].

The show gets tweaked on a regular basis to avoid stagnation, with varying degrees of success. Early seasons used a team challenge to decide which team chose the next fight, a concept that was dropped by season 4 in favor of the fight winner's team choosing. Later seasons had a tournament just to get into the house, which proved somewhat popular, although it was dropped for season 10, most likely due to Kimbo Slice's presence (but has returned for Season 11 and on, but dropped again for Season 13 due to the season [[ScrewedByTheNetwork]] [[ScrewedByTheNetwork being shorter than normal]]). It was also dropped for the 20th US season due to the championship being at stake and the 16 contestants already being considered the best in the world at their weight class (and will also be absent from the 21st due to the gym vs. gym dynamic). Season 4's experiment with veteran UFC fighters proved a miserable failure, with wily vets putting on boring fights trying to ensure they were healthy enough to continue to the next bracket. Season 17 changed the filming style considerably, with the show now resembling a serious film-shot documentary.


''The Ultimate Fighter'' is a reality show originally on Spike TV (then FX, now on FS 1), that started in 2005, pitting up-and-coming UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts fighters against one another in a tournament format for a contract(s) in the UFC. The show usually splits the contestants into two teams, each coached by a top UFC fighter. With the exception of Seasons 2 (Rich Franklin and Matt Hughes were friends and refused the bout), 4 (no head coaches), 21 (which was between rival gyms), 22 (between then-Interim Featherweight Champion Conor McGregor and perennial bantamweight fighter Urijah Faber), Latin America 2 (between Season 9 Lightweight winner Efrain Escudero and Season 17 winner Kelvin Gastelum, a welterweight) and Brazil 4 (coached by middleweight legend Anderson Silva and light heavyweight legend Mauricio "Shogun" Rua, although Silva was forced to withdraw as coach early after failing a drug test), the coaches would be scheduled to fight each other after the season was over, using the format to hype the fight. So far, the show has had 25 US seasons and a 26th currently running, one in China, four in Brazil, two in Australia, and three in Latin America. All past seasons are available on UFC.tv via Fight Pass.

to:

''The Ultimate Fighter'' is a reality show originally on Spike TV (then FX, now on FS 1), that started in 2005, pitting up-and-coming UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts fighters against one another in a tournament format for a contract(s) in the UFC. The show usually splits the contestants into two teams, each coached by a top UFC fighter. With the exception of Seasons 2 (Rich Franklin and Matt Hughes were friends and refused the bout), 4 (no head coaches), 21 (which was between rival gyms), 22 (between then-Interim Featherweight Champion Conor McGregor and perennial bantamweight fighter Urijah Faber), Latin America 2 (between Season 9 Lightweight winner Efrain Escudero and Season 17 winner Kelvin Gastelum, a welterweight) and Brazil 4 (coached by middleweight legend Anderson Silva and light heavyweight legend Mauricio "Shogun" Rua, although Silva was forced to withdraw as coach early after failing a drug test), the coaches would be scheduled to fight each other after the season was over, using the format to hype the fight. So far, the show has had 25 27 US seasons and a 26th 28th currently running, in production, one in China, four in Brazil, two in Australia, and three in Latin America. All past seasons are available on UFC.tv via Fight Pass.



The show gets tweaked on a regular basis to avoid stagnation, with varying degrees of success. Early seasons used a team challenge to decide which team chose the next fight, a concept that was dropped by season 4 in favor of the fight winner's team choosing. Later seasons had a tournament just to get into the house, which proved somewhat popular, although it was dropped for season 10, most likely due to Kimbo Slice's presence (but has returned for Season 11 and on, but dropped again for Season 13 due to the season [[ScrewedByTheNetwork being shorter than normal]]). It was also dropped for the 20th US season due to the championship being at stake and the 16 contestants already being considered the best in the world at their weight class (and will also be absent from the 21st due to the gym vs. gym dynamic). Season 4's experiment with veteran UFC fighters proved a miserable failure, with wily vets putting on boring fights trying to ensure they were healthy enough to continue to the next bracket. Season 17 changed the filming style considerably, with the show now resembling a serious film-shot documentary.

to:

The show gets tweaked on a regular basis to avoid stagnation, with varying degrees of success. Early seasons used a team challenge to decide which team chose the next fight, a concept that was dropped by season 4 in favor of the fight winner's team choosing. Later seasons had a tournament just to get into the house, which proved somewhat popular, although it was dropped for season 10, most likely due to Kimbo Slice's presence (but has returned for Season 11 and on, but dropped again for Season 13 due to the season [[ScrewedByTheNetwork [[ScrewedByTheNetwork]] being shorter than normal]]). It was also dropped for the 20th US season due to the championship being at stake and the 16 contestants already being considered the best in the world at their weight class (and will also be absent from the 21st due to the gym vs. gym dynamic). Season 4's experiment with veteran UFC fighters proved a miserable failure, with wily vets putting on boring fights trying to ensure they were healthy enough to continue to the next bracket. Season 17 changed the filming style considerably, with the show now resembling a serious film-shot documentary.


* Season 20 crowned the first ever woman's strawweight champion Carla Esparza in the finale. She is the who lost in her first title defense to Joanna Jedrzejczyk in brutal fashion.
* Season 20 finalist Rose Namajunas came up short in her title fight at the finale against Carla Esparza, but she would rebound and reel off several impressive wins before TKOing Joanna Jedrzejczyk at UFC 217 in a massive upset to win the Women's Strawweight Championship.

to:

* Season 20 crowned the first ever woman's strawweight champion Carla Esparza in the finale. She is the who lost in her first title defense to Joanna Jedrzejczyk in brutal fashion.
* Season 20 finalist Rose Namajunas came up short in her title fight at the finale against Carla Esparza, but she would rebound and reel off several impressive wins before TKOing stopping Joanna Jedrzejczyk by TKO at UFC 217 in a massive upset to win the Women's Strawweight Championship.



* Kenny Florian: TUF 1 finalist. Challenged unsuccessfully for the title 3 times, losing to Sean Sherk (decision), BJ Penn (submission), and Featherweight Champ Jose Aldo (decision).

to:

* Kenny Florian: TUF 1 finalist. Challenged unsuccessfully for the title 3 times, losing to Sean Sherk (decision), BJ Penn (submission), and Featherweight Champ Jose Aldo (decision). He went on to serve as a commentator for the UFC.


The show has spawned six champions:

to:

The show has spawned six eight champions:


''The Ultimate Fighter'' is a reality show originally on Spike TV (then FX, now on FS 1), that started in 2005, pitting up-and-coming UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts fighters against one another in a tournament format for a contract(s) in the UFC. The show usually splits the contestants into two teams, each coached by a top UFC fighter. With the exception of Seasons 2 (Rich Franklin and Matt Hughes were friends and refused the bout), 4 (no head coaches), 21 (which was between rival gyms), 22 (between then-Interim Featherweight Champion Conor McGregor and perennial bantamweight fighter Urijah Faber), Latin America 2 (between Season 9 Lightweight winner Efrain Escudero and Season 17 winner Kelvin Gastelum, a welterweight) and Brazil 4 (coached by middleweight legend Anderson Silva and light heavyweight legend Mauricio "Shogun" Rua, although Silva was forced to withdraw as coach early after failing a drug test), the coaches would be scheduled to fight each other after the season was over, using the format to hype the fight. So far, the show has had 22 US seasons and a 23rd currently running, one in China, four in Brazil, two in Australia, and two in Latin America. The 24th US and the third Latin American seasons are currently in production. All past seasons are available on UFC.tv via Fight Pass.

Though it varies by season, there are either one or two weight classes represented, resulting in either two tournaments or one big tournament for the contract. The contract originally boasted as being "six figures"; however, that angle has been downplayed over the years. The exception being season 4, "The Comeback," featuring veteran UFC fighters vying for a title shot (this season also was the only one not to have coaches, with a rotating cast of UFC fighters and champs providing training assistance, most often Randy Couture and Georges St. Pierre). The 20th US season (''A Champion Will Be Crowned'') had a twist as well, as it was a tournament to crown the first female strawweight champion, with all the contestants guaranteed a contract with the UFC to fill out its new division. The 21st season also provided a new twist, pitting two rival Florida gyms (American Top Team and The Blackzillians) against each other vice coaches. The 24th season saw Flyweight champions from other promotions in a tournament to see who will receive a title shot at the finale.

to:

''The Ultimate Fighter'' is a reality show originally on Spike TV (then FX, now on FS 1), that started in 2005, pitting up-and-coming UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts fighters against one another in a tournament format for a contract(s) in the UFC. The show usually splits the contestants into two teams, each coached by a top UFC fighter. With the exception of Seasons 2 (Rich Franklin and Matt Hughes were friends and refused the bout), 4 (no head coaches), 21 (which was between rival gyms), 22 (between then-Interim Featherweight Champion Conor McGregor and perennial bantamweight fighter Urijah Faber), Latin America 2 (between Season 9 Lightweight winner Efrain Escudero and Season 17 winner Kelvin Gastelum, a welterweight) and Brazil 4 (coached by middleweight legend Anderson Silva and light heavyweight legend Mauricio "Shogun" Rua, although Silva was forced to withdraw as coach early after failing a drug test), the coaches would be scheduled to fight each other after the season was over, using the format to hype the fight. So far, the show has had 22 25 US seasons and a 23rd 26th currently running, one in China, four in Brazil, two in Australia, and two three in Latin America. The 24th US and the third Latin American seasons are currently in production.America. All past seasons are available on UFC.tv via Fight Pass.

Though it varies by season, there are either one or two weight classes represented, resulting in either two tournaments or one big tournament for the contract. The contract originally boasted as being "six figures"; however, that angle has been downplayed over the years. The exception being season 4, "The Comeback," featuring veteran UFC fighters vying for a title shot (this season also was the only one not to have coaches, with a rotating cast of UFC fighters and champs providing training assistance, most often Randy Couture and Georges St. Pierre). The 20th US season (''A Champion Will Be Crowned'') had a twist as well, as it was a tournament to crown the first female strawweight champion, with all the contestants guaranteed a contract with the UFC to fill out its new division. The 21st season also provided a new twist, pitting two rival Florida gyms (American Top Team and The Blackzillians) against each other vice coaches. The 24th season saw Flyweight champions from other promotions in a tournament to see who will receive a title shot at the finale.
finale, while the 26th follows the same concept as the 20th, only this season will be to crown the inaugural Women's Flyweight Champion.



* Season 14 bantamweight finalist T.J. Dillashaw defeated Renan Barao via TKO at UFC 173 for the BW title. He is the first contestant to win a UFC title without winning the show.

to:

* Season 14 bantamweight finalist T.J. Dillashaw defeated Renan Barao via TKO at UFC 173 for the BW title. He is the first contestant to win a UFC title without winning the show. He also is the first to regain a title, defeating former teammate turned hated rival Cody Garbrandt by TKO at UFC 217 to reclaim the Bantamweight crown.




to:

* Season 20 finalist Rose Namajunas came up short in her title fight at the finale against Carla Esparza, but she would rebound and reel off several impressive wins before TKOing Joanna Jedrzejczyk at UFC 217 in a massive upset to win the Women's Strawweight Championship.


Added DiffLines:

* Tim Elliot: TUF 24 winner, also lost to Johnson in a competitive but clear decision.


Added DiffLines:

** Season 25: Redemption featured Cody Garbrandt, then Bantamweight Champion, and former champ TJ Dillashaw. Both men had been teammates on Team Alpha Male, but Dillashaw left the team on extremely poor terms. The tension boiled over numerous times, including an incident where Garbrandt actually grabbed Dillashaw by the throat. Dillashaw would have the last laugh, however, when he TKOed Garbrandt at UFC 217 to reclaim his championship.


Added DiffLines:

** Season 25, the Redemption season, saw Hector Urbina get booted from the competition by Dana White for failing to make weight before the show barely got off the ground.


Added DiffLines:

* MyGreatestSecondChance: Season 25 revolved around bringing former TUF competitors back for another shot at making it to the UFC. In the end, Jesse Taylor, infamous for his Season 7 meltdown that cost him his spot in that season's finale, would defeat Dhiego Lima to finally earn his contract (though thanks to a drug test failure afterwards and unrelated to the fight, it remains to be seen whether he will truly be able to capitalize).


** Season 7 had two guys sent home. The first was more sympathetic because Paul Bradley had to go because of a contagious skin disease beyond his control. The second was caused by a foolish mistake when a drunken Jesse Taylor (who had made it to the finals) kicked out a limousine window, terrorized female guests, and confronted security, screaming that he was a UFC fighter.

to:

** Season 7 had two guys sent home.disqualified. The first was more sympathetic because Paul Bradley had to go because of a contagious skin disease beyond his control. The second was caused finalist Jesse Taylor, who managed to get himself disqualified after the show had wrapped by a foolish mistake when going on a drunken Jesse Taylor (who had made it to the finals) kicked out a limousine window, terrorized female guests, and confronted security, rampage through Las Vegas while screaming that he was a UFC fighter.fighter. An impromptu elimination fight was held to replace him as finalist.



* EscalatingWar: The two teams often get into prank wars that escalate until contestants come to blows. The pranks reached a critical mass when one contestant ate sushi that another contestant had masturbated into. From that point on, later seasons of fighters GenreSavvy enough to not take their pranks too far.

to:

* EscalatingWar: The two teams often get into prank wars that escalate until contestants come to blows. The pranks reached a critical mass when one contestant ate sushi that another contestant had masturbated into. From that point on, later seasons of had fighters GenreSavvy enough to not take their pranks too far.


* Season 1 light heavyweight winner Forrest Griffin beat fellow TUF coach Rampage Jackson for the LHW title in a close decision.
* Season 2 heavyweight winner Rashad Evans. Though he dropped down to LHW immediately after the show, he was the one who beat Griffin via KO, then lost to Lyoto Machida via KO in his first title defense. He would challenge for the title again against Jon Jones and lose via decision.

to:

* Season 1 light heavyweight winner Forrest Griffin beat fellow TUF coach Rampage Jackson for the LHW title in a close decision.
decision at UFC 86.
* Season 2 heavyweight winner Rashad Evans. Though he dropped down to LHW immediately after the show, he was the one who beat Griffin via KO, KO at UFC 92, then lost to Lyoto Machida via KO in his first title defense. He would challenge for the title again against Jon Jones and lose via decision.



* Season 14 bantamweight finalist T.J. Dillashaw defeated Renan Barao via TKO for the BW title. He is the first contestant to win a UFC title without winning the show.
* Season 20 crowned the first ever woman's strawweight champion Carla Esparza in the finale, who lost in her first title defense to Joanna Jedrzejczyk in brutal fashion.

to:

* Season 14 bantamweight finalist T.J. Dillashaw defeated Renan Barao via TKO at UFC 173 for the BW title. He is the first contestant to win a UFC title without winning the show.
* Season 20 crowned the first ever woman's strawweight champion Carla Esparza in the finale, finale. She is the who lost in her first title defense to Joanna Jedrzejczyk in brutal fashion.


* Season 3 light heavyweight winner Michael Bisping would later drop to middleweight, and after years as an almost-but-not-quite-contender, he finally got his chance when he stepped in on short notice to face MW champ Luke Rockhold at UFC 199. Despite being a heavy underdog, Bisping would knock out the seemingly unstoppable Rockhold in the first round to become the new champion, the first UFC champ ever to hail from England.
* Season 4 welterweight winner Matt Serra beat Georges St. Pierre for the WW title by TKO in one of the biggest upsets in UFC history, although he would lose badly in the rematch via TKO.

to:

* Season 3 light heavyweight winner Michael Bisping would later drop to middleweight, and after years as an almost-but-not-quite-contender, he finally got his chance when he stepped for a title in on short notice to face a short-notice fight against the heavy favorite MW champ Luke Rockhold at UFC 199. Despite being a heavy underdog, Bisping would knock knocked out the seemingly unstoppable Rockhold in the first round to become the new champion, the first English UFC champ ever to hail from England.
champ.
* Season 4 welterweight winner Matt Serra beat WW champ Georges St. Pierre for the WW title by TKO at UFC 69 in one of the biggest upsets in UFC history, although he would lose badly in becoming the first ''TUF'' winner to earn a championship belt. He lost the belt in a rematch via TKO.with GSP.



* {{Adorkable}}: Roxanne Modaferri.

to:

* {{Adorkable}}: Roxanne Modaferri.Modaferri, who speaks fluent Japanese and geeks out about anime.


* Season 14 bantamweight finalist T.J. Dillashaw defeated Renan Barao via TKO for the BW title. He is the first contestant to win a UFC title without winning the show, and the only one to successfully defend his title.

to:

* Ultimate Fighter: The Smashes winner Robert Whittaker had mixed success at welterwight after winning the show and thus moved up to middleweight. He is currently unbeaten in the division and at UFC 213 won the Interim Middleweight Championship.
* Season 14 bantamweight finalist T.J. Dillashaw defeated Renan Barao via TKO for the BW title. He is the first contestant to win a UFC title without winning the show, and the only one to successfully defend his title.show.


** In season 10, obese Roy Nelson knocked out the jacked Kimbo Slice.

to:

** In season 10, obese Roy Nelson knocked out stopped the jacked Kimbo Slice.Slice with ground and pound.



** Future LW champ and TUF 19 coach Frankie Edgar applied to be a contestant on Season 5, but was ultimately rejected by the producers. He would go on to get into the UFC anyway, and beat the season's eventual winner Nate Diaz, draw once with and then beat contestant Gray Maynard, and beat season coach BJ Penn three times.

to:

** Future LW champ and TUF 19 coach Frankie Edgar applied to be a contestant on Season 5, but was ultimately rejected by the producers. He would go on to get into the UFC anyway, and beat one of the season's eventual winner Nate Diaz, coaches, BJ Penn, for tge Lightweight Championship, draw once with and then beat knocked out contestant Gray Maynard, Maynard (in two back-to-back fight of nights), and beat season coach besting BJ Penn three times.two more times. Each more impressive than the last.


** Season 15 (''Ultimate Fighter Live'') was coached by Uriah Faber and then-bantamweight champion Dominick Cruz, who had a long-standing rivalry and were tied with one win each against each other. The season seemed to cool a lot of their distaste for each other, in a bit of a twist. The fight was postponed for several years, stemming from Cruz's injuries; after a successful return to championship status, Dominic Cruz defeated Urijah Faber via a lopsided decision.

to:

** Season 15 (''Ultimate Fighter Live'') was coached by Uriah Urijah Faber and then-bantamweight champion Dominick Cruz, who had a long-standing rivalry and were tied with one win each against each other. The season seemed to cool a lot of their distaste for each other, in a bit of a twist. The fight was postponed for several years, stemming from Cruz's injuries; after a successful return to championship status, Dominic Dominick Cruz defeated Urijah Faber via a lopsided decision.



** Season 3 of ''TUF: Brazil'' features Chael Sonnen and Wanderlei Silva. Sonnen has not been shy in the past about running down Brazilian fighters or Brazil itself, as well as jabs against Wanderlei (particularly, claiming many of his fights in PRIDE were fixed). Apart from their contrasting personalities and the inherent difficulties in Sonnen coaching a team of fighters when he doesn't speak the language, Silva and Sonnen got into a scrap within days of beginning filming and one of Silva's assistants sucker-punched Sonnen. As with Silva and Belfort, both men are in trouble with the NSAC (Silva for avoiding a test, Sonnen for testing positive for banned substances twice in two weeks time); Sonnen has retired and was given a heavy fine and a two-year suspension, while Silva was initially banned from the sport for life, a decision that was later struck down. Sonnen and Silva finally faced each other in 2017, though in a different promotion, Bellator, which saw Sonnen won via decision. In a fight that saw Sonnen win after multiple takedowns and ground and pound attacks, but not before Wanderlei caught him with punches a couple of times.

to:

** Season 3 of ''TUF: Brazil'' features Chael Sonnen and Wanderlei Silva. Sonnen has not been shy in the past about running down Brazilian fighters or Brazil itself, as well as jabs against Wanderlei (particularly, claiming many of his fights in PRIDE were fixed). Apart from their contrasting personalities and the inherent difficulties in Sonnen coaching a team of fighters when he doesn't speak the language, Silva and Sonnen got into a scrap within days of beginning filming and one of Silva's assistants sucker-punched Sonnen. As with Silva and Belfort, both men are in trouble with the NSAC (Silva for avoiding a test, Sonnen for testing positive for banned substances twice in two weeks time); Sonnen has retired and was given a heavy fine and a two-year suspension, while Silva was initially banned from the sport for life, a decision that was later struck down. Sonnen and Silva finally faced each other in 2017, though in a different promotion, Bellator, which saw Sonnen won win via decision. In a fight that saw Sonnen win after multiple takedowns and ground and pound attacks, but not before Wanderlei caught him with punches a couple of times.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 42

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report