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''Y'all come back now, y'hear?''

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''Y'all come back now, y'hear?''y'hear?''
----
''This has been a Filmways Preeee-sen-tay-shun!''

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* HistoricalCharactersFictionalRelative: In the film, at a wedding someone wonders "Do you think Cousin Bill got the invitation?" Cut to: [[UsefulNotes/BillClinton exterior shot of the White House, and a voice wondering where he left the invite]].

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* CastingGag: [[Film/NineToFive Dabney Coleman plays Mr. Drysdale and Lily Tomlin plays Miss Hathaway]] in TheFilmOfTheSeries. And Music/DollyParton's even thrown in for good measure.


* RealSongThemeTune: ''The Ballad of Jed Clampett'' recorded by legendary Bluegrass duo Flatt & Scruggs.


%%* XRaySparks

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%%* XRaySparks* XRaySparks: It happens to Jethro when he connects the telephone wire to the high-voltage electrical wire in "The Party Line".

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* PersonalSeals: In "Jed, Incorporated", a running gag has Miss Hathaway use her notary seal to "mistakenly crinkle" corporate documents (or, so saith the hillbillies).


%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.

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%% ZeroContextExample Administrivia/ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.

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* ArmorPiercingResponse: Occasionally delivered by Jed, revealing his [[HiddenDepths abiding wisdom]] among the chaos.
-->'''Pearl:''' That historical lady found out that your ancestors come here before the ''Mayflower''.
-->'''Jed:''' But what's that got to do with me?
-->'''Pearl:''' That's the way society works, Jed. The earlier your kinfolk got here, the higher up that puts ya.
-->'''Jed:''' Then I reckon the highest society folks is the Indians.


* GeorgeJetsonJobSecurity: In the 1993 film, Mr. Drysdale briefly fires Miss Hathaway for [[MistakenIdentity falsely]] [[PoorCommunicationKills sending the Clampetts to jail]], only to be rehired when Jed wants her to keep her employment.

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* GeorgeJetsonJobSecurity: GeorgeJetsonJobSecurity:
**
In the 1993 film, Mr. Drysdale briefly fires Miss Hathaway for [[MistakenIdentity falsely]] [[PoorCommunicationKills sending the Clampetts to jail]], only to be rehired when Jed wants her to keep her employment.employment.
*** This also happens in the second episode of the original series, "Getting Settled".


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* KnowNothingKnowItAll: In later seasons, Jethro becomes insufferably conceited and believes he's an expert on everything. This is by virtue of his sixth-grade education and his "giant brain". Some of his low-lights include his attempt at being a talent agent, his belief he can speak Japanese and any number of claims that he's a Hollywood playboy.


A 1960s SitCom produced by Creator/{{Filmways}} about a family of Ozark-mountain folks who, when oil prospectors discover oil in their swamp, [[RagsToRiches become fantastically rich and move to a mansion in Beverly Hills]], where a greedy banker tries desperately to keep their money in his bank, which means keeping them happy in the foreign environment of Beverly Hills, while simultaneously keeping the city's residents from driving the Clampetts away. A great cast is aided by deceptively smart writing from creator Paul Henning, in a show which, contrary to popular perception, actually had great respect for the mountain people whom it portrayed. (Paul Henning was from Missouri and knew such simple yet honorable and proud people in his youth.) Incredibly successful, the show was eventually a victim of the so-called "Rural Purge" that eliminated shows from CBS' schedule that had a "country" or southern flavor. The series was canceled despite high ratings because they were the wrong ratings (though, considering that Irene Ryan ended up dying only two years after cancellation, it likely would have ended on its own after that point anyway). It lasted from September 1962 to March 1971. A total of 274 episodes in nine seasons aired.

The earlier seasons, in black and white, subvert the dumb hick stereotype to good comic effect by portraying the patriarch, Jed Clampett[[note]]No relation to [[Creator/BobClampett that other Clampett]][[/note]] (played in a typically low-key performance by Buddy Ebsen) as being obviously a lot smarter than city-dwellers assumed, always getting the better of conmen. Milburn Drysdale (Raymond Bailey chews the scenery gleefully in most of his scenes) was actually a friend of the Clampetts, whom he genuinely liked, and did not attempt to swindle them besides his greedy persona. With the exception of Jethro, the Clampetts were never portrayed as stupid, only unfamiliar with their Beverly Hills environment.

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A 1960s Creator/{{CBS}} SitCom produced by Creator/{{Filmways}} about a family of Ozark-mountain folks who, when oil prospectors discover oil in their swamp, [[RagsToRiches become fantastically rich and move to a mansion in Beverly Hills]], where a greedy banker tries desperately to keep their money in his bank, which means keeping them happy in the foreign environment of Beverly Hills, while simultaneously keeping the city's residents from driving the Clampetts away. A great cast is aided by deceptively smart writing from creator Paul Henning, in a show which, contrary to popular perception, actually had great respect for the mountain people whom it portrayed. (Paul Henning was from Missouri and knew such simple yet honorable and proud people in his youth.) Incredibly successful, the show was eventually a victim of the so-called "Rural Purge" that eliminated shows from CBS' schedule that had a "country" or southern flavor. The series was canceled despite high ratings because they were the wrong ratings (though, considering that Irene Ryan ended up dying only two years after cancellation, it likely would have ended on its own after that point anyway). It lasted from September 1962 to March 1971. A total of 274 episodes in nine seasons aired.

The earlier seasons, in black and white, subvert the dumb hick stereotype to good comic effect by portraying the patriarch, Jed Clampett[[note]]No relation to [[Creator/BobClampett that other Clampett]][[/note]] (played in a typically low-key performance by Buddy Ebsen) as being obviously a lot smarter than city-dwellers assumed, always getting the better of conmen.con men. Milburn Drysdale (Raymond Bailey chews the scenery gleefully in most of his scenes) was actually a friend of the Clampetts, whom he genuinely liked, and did not attempt to swindle them besides his greedy persona. With the exception of Jethro, the Clampetts were never portrayed as stupid, only unfamiliar with their Beverly Hills environment.


TheFilmOfTheSeries was made in 1993 to mixed reviews. It focuses on the attempt of new characters Woodrow Tyler (Rob Schneider) and Laura Jackson (Lea Thompson) to con the Clampetts out of their money. The film was directed by Penelope Spheeris, previously known for such films as ''Hollywood Vice Squad'' (1986) and ''Film/WaynesWorld'' (1992).

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TheFilmOfTheSeries was made in 1993 to mixed reviews. It focuses on the attempt of new characters Woodrow Tyler (Rob Schneider) and Laura Jackson (Lea Thompson) (Creator/LeaThompson) to con the Clampetts out of their money. The film was directed by Penelope Spheeris, previously known for such films as ''Hollywood Vice Squad'' ''Film/HollywoodViceSquad'' (1986) and ''Film/WaynesWorld'' (1992).


* WateringDown: Granny, a moonshiner, usually make strong liquor. But she usually waters it down for the city folks who couldn't handle it at full strength.

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* WateringDown: Granny, a moonshiner, usually make makes strong liquor. But liquor, but she usually waters it down does this for the city folks who couldn't handle it at full strength.


** The movie did likewise with her and, to greater extent but in in fewer clips, Laura Jackson and a young brunette relative the Clampetts left behind.

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** The movie did likewise with her and, her, and to greater extent but in in fewer clips, Laura Jackson and a young brunette relative the Clampetts left behind.


* ObfuscatingStupidity: Played straight with Jed Clampett in that he isn't as simple as his speech and general appearance implies. [[SubvertedTrope Also subverted]] in one episode where officials believe that Jethro must be [[ObfuscatingStupidity obfuscating stupidity]] in an attempt to get out of been conscripted as they cannot believe that anyone could be as stupid as Jethro seems to be.

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* ObfuscatingStupidity: Played straight with Jed Clampett in that he isn't as simple as his speech and general appearance implies. [[SubvertedTrope Also subverted]] in one episode where officials believe that Jethro must be [[ObfuscatingStupidity obfuscating stupidity]] doing exactly this in an attempt to get out of been conscripted as they cannot believe that anyone could be as stupid as Jethro seems to be.


** The trope makes its appearance in the series. In the first couple seasons, Cousin Peal, Jethro and Jethrine Bodine are plainly said have originally lived in Oxford, Tennessee. This leads to a gag in the second episode, "Getting Settled", where Mr. Drysdale and Miss Hathaway believe that Jethro goes to school at ''the'' Oxford.

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** The trope makes its appearance in the series. In the first couple seasons, Cousin Peal, Pearl, Jethro and Jethrine Bodine are plainly said have originally lived in Oxford, Tennessee. This leads to a gag in the second episode, "Getting Settled", where Mr. Drysdale and Miss Hathaway believe that Jethro goes to school at ''the'' Oxford.

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