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* LaterInstallmentWeirdness: ''Franchise/StarTrek'' began as a [[MinovskyPhysics semi-hard science fiction series]][[note]]Hard enough for people to [[LifeImitatesArt make much of the technology real]][[/note]] about a Human run [[MilitaryScienceFiction elite paramilitary organization]] that sent out their [[CoolStarship best Starship]] to [[BoldExplorer explore outer space]]. Many plots revolved around how the humans handled encountering the strangeness of the universe, while occasionally segueing into SpaceOpera. Since then, newer writers have incorporated many elements of contemporary and post-contemporary science-fiction, with the [[SpiritualAntithesis following installments]] sometimes resembling ''Franchise/StarWars'' outings.


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* MinovskyPhysics: In contrast to [[LaterInstallmentWeirdness later installments of the series]], a lack of techno-babble was ''specifically enforced'' in Star Trek's original Writer's Guide([[https://www.bu.edu/clarion/guides/Star_Trek_Writers_Guide.pdf linked here]]). This extended to fictional materials introduced for the plot. Even now, ''Franchise/StarTrek'' has grown to have a [[http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Materials_and_substances very long list of fictional substances and their properties:]] very rarely is any material given new abilities to fill a plot need: instead, the writers invent entirely new materials.
** [[{{Unobtainium}} Dilithium crystals]] are a fundamental aspect of the Star Trek universe, as all Federation starships use them for their FasterThanLight engines. They have basically one important property: they are able to safely interact with antimatter to produce a controlled reaction. They cannot be [[MatterReplicator replicated]] and can decay in quality, which adds to some tension in either repairing the imperfections in the existing crystal, or finding new sources of dilithium.
** Star Trek's [[AllThereInTheManual technical manuals]] all try to provide consistent explanations for the science and technology of the series.


* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: The motivation behind violating orders 90% of the time (the other 10% being ThePowerOfFriendship).

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* ScientificallyUnderstandableSorcery: While there are plenty of incidents where the Enterprise crew seems to encounter the supernatural, said supernatural thing is always shown to have a scientific basis when [[SufficientlyAnalyzedMagic sufficiently analyzed]] by the characters. That said, sometimes the thing is ''[[SufficientlyAdvancedAlien too advanced]]'' to analyze with the Enterprise's technology, and thus remains indecipherable.
* ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight: The motivation behind violating orders 90% of Whenever Kirk violates given orders, it's specifically to avoid the time (the other 10% being ThePowerOfFriendship).loss of his ship and crew, or to avoid making a situation worse by not seeing it through to the end.



** Trelane, the Squire of Gothos... at least until Kirk breaks whatever it is he has behind that mirror. In the episode "Catspaw", Sylvia and Korob... until Kirk shatters the power transmuter wand tied to the illusions to themselves and the planet. You may notice a theme.

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** Trelane, the Squire of Gothos... at least until Kirk breaks whatever it is he has behind that mirror. In the episode "Catspaw", Sylvia and Korob... until Kirk shatters the power transmuter wand tied to the illusions to themselves and the planet. [[SufficientlyAnalyzedMagic You may notice a theme.theme]].



%%* SendInTheSearchTeam: "Patterns of Force", "Bread and Circuses", "Return of the Archons"

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%%* * SendInTheSearchTeam: "Patterns of Force", "Bread and Circuses", "Return of Whenever the Archons"Enterprise loses track of important personnel on a planet, they send in the RedshirtArmy to find them. This occurs in several episodes.



* SpaceMines: In the episode "Balance of Terror", the Romulan ship uses one of its self-destruct devices as an impromptu mine in an attempt to destroy the ''Enterprise''.

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* SpaceMines: In the episode "Balance of Terror", the Romulan ship uses one of its self-destruct devices as an impromptu mine in an attempt to destroy the ''Enterprise''. It's also noted in the Writer's Guide that the Enterprise's photon torpedoes can be used as mines, but this is never actually done in any episode.


** Clever wordplay in "The Naked Time", when Sulu imagines himself a heroic swordsman.

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** Clever wordplay in "The Naked Time", when Sulu imagines himself a heroic swordsman.swordsman (reputedly a ThrowItIn by Nichelle Nichols).



** ''Star Trek'' did show [[http://mystartrekscrapbook.blogspot.com/2009/07/sttmp-comes-to-tv.html the first televised interracial kiss]] between Uhura and Chapel in the first season episode "What Are Little Girls Made Of", albeit as just a brief congratulatory peck on the cheek between two sisterly colleagues.

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** ''Star Trek'' did show [[http://mystartrekscrapbook.blogspot.com/2009/07/sttmp-comes-to-tv.html the first televised interracial kiss]] [[https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2015/nov/20/tv-archive-discovers-couple-who-beat-kirk-and-uhara-to-first-interracial-kiss on American television]] between Uhura and Chapel in the first season episode "What Are Little Girls Made Of", albeit as just a brief congratulatory peck on the cheek between two sisterly colleagues.


The origin of the show came when Creator/GeneRoddenberry was looking to write hard-hitting political and moral commentary and could not do so with the regular dramas of the time. He deduced that by creating a science fiction show borrowing heavily from the film ''Film/ForbiddenPlanet'', he could slip in such commentary disguised as metaphors for the various current events. As such he pitched ''Star Trek'' to the networks as a merging of the two most popular genres of the time, [[WagonTrainToTheStars science fiction anthologies and Westerns'']].[[note]]Notably, he pitched it as "Series/WagonTrain in space", not "[[BeamMeUpScotty Wagon Train To The Stars]]"[[/note]].

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The origin of the show came when Creator/GeneRoddenberry was looking to write hard-hitting political and moral commentary and could not do so with the regular dramas of the time. He deduced that by creating a science fiction show borrowing heavily from the film ''Film/ForbiddenPlanet'', he could slip in such commentary disguised as metaphors for the various current events. As such he pitched ''Star Trek'' to the networks as a merging of the two most popular genres of the time, [[WagonTrainToTheStars science fiction anthologies and Westerns'']].[[note]]Notably, he pitched it as "Series/WagonTrain [[RecycledInSpace in space", space]]", not "[[BeamMeUpScotty Wagon Train To The Stars]]"[[/note]].


In some ways the show was [[FairForItsDay way ahead of its time]]; in other ways, it is [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece a product of it's time]]. The women usually (but not always) [[StayInTheKitchen appeared in the roles of assistants and secretaries]], wearing go-go boots and miniskirts. (At least some of that was due to ExecutiveMeddling; additionally, Grace Lee Whitney has mentioned that the female regulars [[ValuesDissonance objected to initial efforts to have them wear pants]] because they ''preferred'' [[ShesGotLegs showing off their legs]]). While the visual design of the show was ambitious, the actual production quality has not aged well.

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In some ways the show was [[FairForItsDay way ahead of its time]]; in other ways, it is [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece a product of it's its time]]. The women usually (but not always) [[StayInTheKitchen appeared in the roles of assistants and secretaries]], wearing go-go boots and miniskirts. (At least some of that was due to ExecutiveMeddling; additionally, Grace Lee Whitney has mentioned that the female regulars [[ValuesDissonance objected to initial efforts to have them wear pants]] because they ''preferred'' [[ShesGotLegs showing off their legs]]). While the visual design of the show was ambitious, the actual production quality has not aged well.

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* ScienceIsGood: The show portrays a fairly utopian, post-scarcity, post-racism future for humankind, with {{Cool Starship}}s and FasterThanLightTravel. Unlike many science-focused works, the original series is fairly idealistic and romantic, showing respect for both nature/tradition and new science and medicine.


** At the end of [[Recap/StarTrekS1E24ThisSideOfParadise "This Side of Paradise"]], when the ''Enterprise'' is leaving Omicron Ceti III, McCoy, reflecting on the euphoric effect the planet's spores had on the crew, states that "Well, that's the second time [[GardenOfEden man's been thrown out of Paradise."]]

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** At the end of [[Recap/StarTrekS1E24ThisSideOfParadise "This Side of Paradise"]], when the ''Enterprise'' is leaving Omicron Ceti III, McCoy, Dr. [=McCoy=], reflecting on the euphoric effect the planet's spores had on the crew, states that "Well, that's the second time [[GardenOfEden man's been thrown out of Paradise."]]


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** Near the end of [[Recap/StarTrekS3E20TheWayToEden "The Way to Eden"]], Adam, one of Dr. Sevrin's followers, literally dies on the [[GardenOfEden planet Eden]] after eating a [[TemptingApple poisoned apple]]; Spock sardonically points this out.


** In the PilotEpisode, Captain Christopher Pike's character was subjected to an illusion of Hell when he refused to cooperate with his Talosian jailers. The illusion was stated to be made from information gotten from his own mind, implying that he was raised as a Christian.
** [[http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Angela_Martine Angela Martine,]] from the episode [[Recap/StarTrekS1E14BalanceOfTerror "Balance of Terror"]] genuflected before the altar during her marriage ceremony, implying that she is a member of either the Catholic or Episcopalian church.
** At the end of [[Recap/StarTrekS1E24ThisSideOfParadise "This Side of Paradise"]], when the ''Enterprise'' is leaving Omicron Ceti III, McCoy, reflecting on the euphoric effect the planet's spores had on the crew, states that "Well, that's the second time [[GardenOfEden man's been thrown out of Paradise."]]



** In another episode, Kirk and Crew come upon a planet dominated by a Roman Empire but with 20th century technology, where a persecuted, pacifist new religion worships a sun god. At the end of the episode, Lieutenant Uhura discovers that this new religion does not worship the Sun but the Son, clearly referencing Jesus. Kirk even considers remaining at the planet for a number of years just so they can "watch it happen all over again."
** In the PilotEpisode, Captain Christopher Pike's character was subjected to an illusion of Hell when he refused to cooperate with his Talosian jailers. The illusion was stated to be made from information gotten from his own mind, implying that he was raised as a Christian.
** [[http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Angela_Martine Angela Martine,]] from the episode ''Balance of Terror,'' genuflected before the altar during her marriage ceremony, implying that she is a member of either the Catholic or Episcopalian church.
** In [[Recap/StarTrekS2E24TheUltimateComputer "The Ultimate Computer,"]] both Dr. Richard Daystrom and, consequently, the [[ReligiousRobot sentient M-5 computer he built]] believe in God. Kirk makes the M-5 realize that in committing murder, it has sinned, and it shut itself down out of remorse.

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** In another episode, [[Recap/StarTrekS2E24TheUltimateComputer "The Ultimate Computer"]], both Dr. Richard Daystrom and, consequently, the [[ReligiousRobot sentient M-5 computer he built]] believe in God. Kirk makes the M-5 realize that in committing murder, it has sinned, and it shut itself down out of remorse.
** In [[Recap/StarTrekS2E25BreadandCircuses "Bread and Circuses"]],
Kirk and Crew come upon a planet dominated by a Roman Empire but with 20th century technology, where a persecuted, pacifist new religion worships a sun god. At the end of the episode, Lieutenant Uhura discovers that this new religion does not worship the Sun but the Son, clearly referencing Jesus. Kirk even considers remaining at the planet for a number of years just so they can "watch it happen all over again."
** In the PilotEpisode, Captain Christopher Pike's character was subjected to an illusion of Hell when he refused to cooperate with his Talosian jailers. The illusion was stated to be made from information gotten from his own mind, implying that he was raised as a Christian.
** [[http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Angela_Martine Angela Martine,]] from the episode ''Balance of Terror,'' genuflected before the altar during her marriage ceremony, implying that she is a member of either the Catholic or Episcopalian church.
** In [[Recap/StarTrekS2E24TheUltimateComputer "The Ultimate Computer,"]] both Dr. Richard Daystrom and, consequently, the [[ReligiousRobot sentient M-5 computer he built]] believe in God. Kirk makes the M-5 realize that in committing murder, it has sinned, and it shut itself down out of remorse.
"


* Kirk leads a landing party to a [[PlanetOfHats planet with a single major defining element in their culture]]. Commonly, it will be a [[CuttingCorners a society that perfectly mirrors one from Earth's history]].[[note]]No need to build new sets for an alien planet when you can just shoot a local city street and reuse props designed for the Roman Empire![[/note]] Their hosts rudely steal their communicators and phasers, [[{{Jerkass}} usually because they just can't bear to let them leave]]. Lots of running around and fistfights ensue. At the end, Kirk gives a [[KirkSummation speech to point out what's wrong with the planet's culture]]. Alternatively, the people on the planet will be a worshipping a [[PhysicalGod "god"]] [[MachineWorship who turns out to be a computer]] that [[OrderIsNotGood controls every aspect of it's citizens lives]]. Kirk will then [[KillTheGod destroy it]] to emancipate them, acknowledging that while their new life may [[BothOrderAndChaosAreDangerous may become equally dangerous]], [[LibertyOverProsperity freedom is a right that should never be sacrificed]].

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* Kirk leads a landing party to a [[PlanetOfHats planet with a single major defining element in their culture]]. Commonly, it will be a [[CuttingCorners a society that perfectly mirrors one from Earth's history]].[[note]]No need to build new sets for an alien planet when you can just shoot a local city street and reuse props designed for the Roman Empire![[/note]] Their hosts rudely steal their communicators and phasers, [[{{Jerkass}} usually because they just can't bear to let them leave]]. Lots of running around and fistfights ensue. At the end, Kirk gives a [[KirkSummation speech to point out what's wrong with the planet's culture]]. Alternatively, the people on the planet will be a worshipping a [[PhysicalGod "god"]] [[MachineWorship who turns out to be a computer]] that [[OrderIsNotGood controls every aspect of it's citizens its citizensí lives]]. Kirk will then [[KillTheGod destroy it]] to emancipate them, acknowledging that while their new life may [[BothOrderAndChaosAreDangerous may become equally dangerous]], [[LibertyOverProsperity freedom is a right that should never be sacrificed]].


* ContinuitySnarl: This series is responsible for a good 90% of the continuity problems in TheVerse. It took quite a few episodes before they settled on what year it was (sometimes as near as the 2100s, sometimes as far as ''2700''), what group the ''Enterprise'' worked for (in some episodes it's the United Earth Space Probe Agency, in some it's Starfleet, etc.), the name of Spock's race (Vulcan is settled on later, but Vulcanian was still being used up till the end of the first season), references to the past that have already happened by the time the later series were being made (Khan's starship leaves in the 1990s, something plainly impossible today), and so on. Some of these have been {{handwaved}} or attempted to be explained away, but a lot of them still cause big problems that fans prefer to overlook.


* TechnoBabble: Interestingly for a Star Trek show, outside of a few rare occurrences, this trope is ''[[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness almost never used]]''. Instead, any technological devices are merely referred to by their explicit functions whenever they are used by the plot. (So, a Photon Torpedo is a [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin torpedo that releases photons]], as opposed to a "[[ExpospeakGag 10 isoton thermolytic warhead encased in a rectified multiphasic matrix]]") It wouldn't be until Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration that Techno-babble became a major trope in Star Trek.

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* TechnoBabble: Interestingly for a Star Trek show, outside of a few rare occurrences, this trope is ''[[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness almost never used]]''. Instead, any technological devices are merely referred to by their explicit functions whenever they are used by the plot. (So, a Photon Torpedo is a [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin torpedo that releases photons]], as opposed to a "[[ExpospeakGag 10 isoton thermolytic warhead encased in a rectified multiphasic matrix]]") It wouldn't be until Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration that Techno-babble became a major trope in Star Trek. As it turns out, a lack of techno-babble was ''specifically enforced'' in the Writer's Guide. ([[https://www.bu.edu/clarion/guides/Star_Trek_Writers_Guide.pdf linked here]]):
--> "The writer must know what he means when he uses science or projected science terminology. A scattergun confusion of meaningless phrases only detracts from believability." - Gene Roddenberry


* AggressiveNegotiations:This can happen quite easily. The Federation's Starfleet [[GunboatDiplomacy often flexes their muscle]], and they [[AppealToForce almost never bluff]]. In fact, their official policy regarding diplomatic contacts with hostile forces extends to potentially [[FinalSolution killing everything on the planet]][[note]]As per [[https://www.trekbbs.com/threads/general-order-24-were-kir-kand-scotty-bluffing.224323/ Starfleet General Order 24]][[/note]], which is frighteningly easy to do because all large starship weapons are essentially [[WeaponOfMassDestruction weapons of mass destruction]].
* AIIsACrapshoot: "The Changeling", in which one of Earth's probes attempts to go to Earth and "sterilize it", "The Ultimate Computer" in which M-5, designed by Dr. Daystrom, goes rogue and mistakes a wargame for the real thing, "The Return of the Archons", in which a computer has stagnated a planet's entire culture, and "For The World Is Hollow And I Have Touched The Sky", in which a computer keeps the people on an asteroid ship ignorant that they're on an asteroid and punishes those who try to find the truth, just to name a few.

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* AggressiveNegotiations:This AggressiveNegotiations: This can happen quite easily. The Federation's Starfleet [[GunboatDiplomacy often flexes their muscle]], and they [[AppealToForce almost never bluff]]. In fact, their official policy regarding diplomatic contacts with hostile forces extends to potentially ''potentially [[FinalSolution killing everything on the planet]][[note]]As planet]]''[[note]]As per [[https://www.trekbbs.com/threads/general-order-24-were-kir-kand-scotty-bluffing.224323/ Starfleet General Order 24]][[/note]], which is frighteningly easy to do because all large starship weapons are essentially [[WeaponOfMassDestruction weapons of mass destruction]].
* AIIsACrapshoot: "The Changeling", in which one of Earth's probes attempts to go to Earth Star Trek is all about technology and "sterilize it", "The Ultimate Computer" in which M-5, designed by Dr. Daystrom, goes rogue how it can be used to further human civilization. However, the show also takes the stance that relying too much automation is unhealthy, and mistakes a wargame for the real thing, use of any technology without understanding the implications is ''actively dangerous''.
** In
"The Return of the Archons", in which a computer has effectively stagnated a planet's entire culture, and culture into an ongoing, meaningless cycle of merely existing.
** In
"For The World Is Hollow And I Have Touched The Sky", in which a computer keeps the people on an asteroid ship generational refugees under it's watch ignorant of the fact that they're on living in an asteroid asteroid, and punishes those who try to find the truth, just truth.
** In "The Changeling", one of Earth's probes - programmed
to name seek out life - collided with and damaged an alien probe that was programmed to sterilize soil samples from other planets. The alien probe used parts of Earth's probe to repair itself, resulting in their programs merging to "[[CrushKillDestroy seek out life and sterilize it]]".
** In "The Ultimate Computer" the M-5 unit, designed by Dr. Daystrom, goes rogue after it mistakes
a few.wargame for the real thing.



* AlwaysChaoticEvil:
** [[AIIsACrapshoot Computers]] besides the ''Enterprise's'', androids, and for the most part the alien races called Romulans and Klingons [[spoiler:except in [[Film/StarTrekVTheFinalFrontier the fifth film]], which has one good Klingon, and [[Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry the sixth film]], which portrays Klingons as more varied]]. As originally written, the Klingons were AlwaysChaoticEvil to the Romulans' LawfulEvil: both Romulan commanders are shown as {{Worthy Opponent}}s who just happen to be on the other side, and it's commented that if not for their allegiances, they and the ''Enterprise'' crew would probably get along just fine. This is changed in the movies, where the Romulans are relegated to the background and the Klingons given more development. Gene Roddenberry probably included an android and a Klingon as main characters in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' to subvert this trope.
** The series also had several subversions, among them the Horta, who is initially presented and believed to be (as the episode title states) a "Devil in the Dark", but turns out to be a mother protecting her eggs, and the Romulans, who are introduced by launching an unprovoked sneak attack--but in the same episode the two main Romulan characters are examples of MyCountryRightOrWrong and WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife. Even the ''Klingons'' get a minor subversion in "Errand of Mercy", when the Organians predict that [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration at some future time]] the Klingons and the Federation will become fast friends, working together.
** There's also "Day of the Dove", when after learning they are being manipulated by an EnergyBeing into a senseless, endless war with Kirk's crew, the Klingons team up in an EnemyMine.

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* AlwaysChaoticEvil:
** [[AIIsACrapshoot Computers]] besides
AlwaysChaoticEvil: This trope is continually subverted. The enemies of the ''Enterprise's'', androids, Federation - including the [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Klingons]] - are definitely dangerous and for the most part the alien races called Romulans and Klingons [[spoiler:except in [[Film/StarTrekVTheFinalFrontier the fifth film]], which has one good Klingon, and [[Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry the sixth film]], which portrays Klingons as more varied]]. As originally written, the Klingons were AlwaysChaoticEvil to the Romulans' LawfulEvil: both Romulan commanders hostile, but they are always shown as {{Worthy Opponent}}s who just happen to be on the other side, individuals with varying opinions and it's commented that if not rationales for their allegiances, they and the ''Enterprise'' crew would probably get along just fine. This is changed in the movies, where the Romulans are relegated to the background and the Klingons given more development. Gene Roddenberry probably included an android and actions that exist outside of a Klingon as main characters in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' to subvert this trope.
simple "good/evil" dichotomy.
** The series also had several subversions, among them the Horta, who Horta is initially presented and believed to be (as the episode title states) a "Devil in the Dark", but turns out to be a mother protecting her eggs, and eggs.
** ''Balance of Terror'' is the first episode to feature
the Romulans, who are introduced by launching an unprovoked sneak attack--but in attack. In the same selfsame episode the two main Romulan characters are examples of MyCountryRightOrWrong and WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife. Even WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife, and it is made very clear that if it weren't for their being on opposite sides of battle, Kirk and the ''Klingons'' get a minor subversion Romulan Commander could have easily been friends.
** The episode ''Errand of Mercy'' marks the first appearance of the Klingons, and
in "Errand of Mercy", when that very episode the Organians - a more enlightened species than Humans ''or' Klingons - predict that at some [[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration at some future time]] future]] [[Series/StarTrekDeepspaceNine date]], the Klingons and the Federation will become fast friends, allies, working together.
**
together. There's also "Day of the Dove", when after learning that they are being manipulated by an EnergyBeing into a senseless, endless war with Kirk's crew, the Klingons team up in an EnemyMine.



** [[http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Angela_Martine Angela Martine,]] from the episode ''Balance of Terror,'' genuflected before the altar during her marriage ceremony, implying that she is a member of the Catholic Church. (Note, however, that this is not exclusively a Roman Catholic practice. Some Episcopalians, for example, also genuflect in front of the altar.)
** In [[Recap/StarTrekS2E24TheUltimateComputer "The Ultimate Computer,"]] both Dr. Richard Daystrom and, consequently, the [[ReligiousRobot sentient M-5 computer he built]] believe in God. Kirk makes the M-5 realize that in committing murder, it has sinned, and it cut its own power out of remorse.
* AmnesiaDanger: In "The Paradise Syndrome", the danger was that the amnesiac character (Kirk) had forgotten that there was a danger. Hilariously, the main thing he knew that (once remembered) saved the day was learned literally second before he lost his memory.

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** [[http://memory-alpha.wikia.com/wiki/Angela_Martine Angela Martine,]] from the episode ''Balance of Terror,'' genuflected before the altar during her marriage ceremony, implying that she is a member of either the Catholic Church. (Note, however, that this is not exclusively a Roman Catholic practice. Some Episcopalians, for example, also genuflect in front of the altar.)
or Episcopalian church.
** In [[Recap/StarTrekS2E24TheUltimateComputer "The Ultimate Computer,"]] both Dr. Richard Daystrom and, consequently, the [[ReligiousRobot sentient M-5 computer he built]] believe in God. Kirk makes the M-5 realize that in committing murder, it has sinned, and it cut its own power shut itself down out of remorse.
* AmnesiaDanger: In "The Paradise Syndrome", the danger was that the amnesiac character (Kirk) had forgotten that there was a danger. Hilariously, the main thing he knew that (once remembered) saved the day was learned literally second before he lost his memory.



** The unfortunate fate that Captain Pike is ultimately reduced to. They fix it in "The Menagerie".

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** The unfortunate fate that Captain Pike is ultimately reduced to. They fix it in "The Menagerie".



** "The Ultimate Computer": M-5, the computer, is a typical AIIsACrapshoot.

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** "The Ultimate Computer": M-5, the computer, is a typical AIIsACrapshoot.



* AttackReflector: PlayedWith in the episode "The Corbomite Maneuver". Kirk threatens to use the eponymous strategy with a device embedded in the ''Enterprise''. If any destructive energy hits it, the corbomite creates a reverse reaction of equal strength that destroys the attacker. He was bluffing: there was actually no such device and no such maneuver.

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* AttackReflector: PlayedWith in the episode "The Corbomite Maneuver". Kirk threatens to use the eponymous strategy with a device embedded in the ''Enterprise''. If any destructive energy hits it, the corbomite creates a reverse reaction of equal strength that destroys the attacker. [[spoiler: He was bluffing: there was actually no such device and no such maneuver.]]



%%* BatmanGambit: Kirk can pull these off in ways that would make Franchise/{{Batman}} himself proud. The "corbomite" bluff, for one thing. GIVE MORE ACTUAL EXAMPLES

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%%* * BatmanGambit: Kirk is ''very good'' at reading his opponents in battle, and thus can pull these off in ways that would make Franchise/{{Batman}} himself proud. The "corbomite" bluff, for one thing. GIVE MORE ACTUAL EXAMPLES''The Corbomite Maneuver'' is a distinct example, and the entirety of ''Balance of Terror'' has Kirk ''continuously'' doing this to the commander of a Romulan ship, estimating his every action and intention based on the maneuvers he makes:
--> (Enterprise fires on the still [[StealthInSpace cloaked]] Romulan ship, scoring a near-miss)
--> '''Romulan Sub-Commander:''' "How, commander? HOW?!"
--> '''Romulan Commander:''' "He is a ''sorcerer'' that one, he reads the thoughts of me!"



** Not precisely "battle," but the [[SpaceAmish space hippies]] in "The Way To Eden" have "Herbert! Herbert!"



** The "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCamCYip2t4 Theme From Amok Time]]", an example of OrchestralBombing which has been appropriated by so many homages and parodies it's practically an UndeadHorseTrope at this point.

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** The "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCamCYip2t4 Theme From Amok Time]]", an example of OrchestralBombing which has been appropriated by so many homages and parodies it's parodies. It's practically an UndeadHorseTrope at this point.



* BlackAndWhiteMorality: [[AvertedTrope Averted]]. The Federation may be a {{Utopia}}, but they only remain as one through military power. [[WhatTheHellHero They get called out on this more than once]].
* BlackComedy: "A Piece of the Action", "The Trouble With Tribbles". Also dialogue moments in other episodes, such as this exchange in "This Side of Paradise" where Kirk and Spock ([[ItMakesSenseInContext the only crew remaining on the Enterprise]]) are going to build a transmitter utilising the communicators' emergency channel, but first Kirk has to fight Spock to free him of the spores:

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* BlackAndWhiteMorality: [[AvertedTrope Averted]]. The Federation may be a {{Utopia}}, near-{{Utopia}}, but they only remain as one through military power. [[WhatTheHellHero They get called out on this more than once]].
* BlackComedy: "A Piece of the Action", and "The Trouble With Tribbles". Also Tribbles" both thrive on this trope. It can also be seen dialogue moments in other episodes, such as this exchange in "This Side of Paradise" where Kirk and Spock ([[ItMakesSenseInContext the only crew remaining on the Enterprise]]) are going to build a transmitter utilising the communicators' emergency channel, but first Kirk has to fight Spock to free him of the spores:



* BluffingTheAuthorities: The episode "City on the Edge of Forever". After Kirk and Spock go back in time to 1930's New York City they're about to steal some clothing to replace their Enterprise uniforms but meet a police officer and have to explain Spock's pointed Vulcan ears. They come up with a story that Spock is Chinese and had a childhood accident involving a mechanical rice picker and plastic surgery, but the cop doesn't buy it.
* BluffTheEavesdropper: In "The Deadly Years", due to having been rapidly aged by mysterious radiation and gone senile, Kirk has stepped down from command. His incompetent replacement has led the ship through the Romulan Neutral Zone, and the Romulans are about to destroy them. Suddenly a cure is found, a restored Kirk appears on the bridge and gives an order to relay a message to Starfleet--using a code previously established as having been broken by the Romulans, which briefly causes the crew to wonder if he's still senile. Nevertheless, they open the channels and Kirk sends a message that the ''Enterprise'' will self destruct via the [[CallBack Corbomite Device]] and destroy any ship in a huge radius. The Romulans intercept the message and leave.
%% * BluntMetaphorsTrauma: Spock.
* BoldlyComing: Kirk is the TropeMaker. That said,[[UnbuiltTrope Kirk's reputation for sleeping his way across the galaxy has been greatly exaggerated in the public mind]]; while he makes out with many a GirlOfTheWeek, [[HoneyTrap 9 times out of 10 it's specifically to manipulate them]], and sex is only implied in a few instances: once when he marries a native girl while amnesiac, and gets her pregnant; once when the show returns from commercial to find a woman brushing her hair in his room while he puts his boots back on; a SexyDiscretionShot to an overhead lamp as Kirk kisses a SexSlave girl who's been "ordered to please" him[[note]]A line that was cut had Kirk drinking wine and saying "good," eating something and saying "excellent," and then -- "And you?" and the woman says "Superb, I'm told."[[/note]]; and Kirk sitting up in bed taking a call from the bridge, the woman lying next to him, she rolls over and sits up.

to:

* BluffingTheAuthorities: The episode "City on the Edge of Forever". After Kirk and Spock go back in time to 1930's New York City they're about to steal some clothing to replace their Enterprise uniforms but meet a police officer and have to explain Spock's pointed Vulcan ears. They come up with a story that Spock is Chinese and had a childhood accident involving a mechanical rice picker and plastic surgery, [[NoSell but the cop doesn't buy it.
it]].
* BluffTheEavesdropper: In "The Deadly Years", due to having been rapidly aged by mysterious radiation and gone senile, Kirk has stepped down from command. His incompetent replacement has led the ship through the Romulan Neutral Zone, and the Romulans are about to destroy them. Suddenly a cure is found, a restored Kirk appears on the bridge and gives an order to relay a message to Starfleet--using a code previously established as having been broken by the Romulans, which briefly causes the crew to wonder if he's still senile. Nevertheless, they open the channels and Kirk sends a message that the ''Enterprise'' will self destruct via the [[CallBack Corbomite Device]] and destroy any ship in a huge radius. The Romulans intercept the message and leave.
%%
[[ScrewThisImOuttaHere leave in a hurry]].
* BluntMetaphorsTrauma: Spock.
Thank's to his incredibly rationalist thinking, Spock has notable difficulty with understanding human euphemisms and metaphors.
* BoldlyComing: Kirk is the TropeMaker. TropeCodifier. That said,[[UnbuiltTrope Kirk's reputation for sleeping his way across the galaxy has been greatly exaggerated in the public mind]]; while he makes out with many a GirlOfTheWeek, [[HoneyTrap 9 times out of 10 it's specifically to manipulate them]], and sex is only implied in a few rare instances: once when he marries a native girl while amnesiac, and gets her pregnant; once when the show returns from commercial to find a woman brushing her hair in his room while he puts his boots back on; a SexyDiscretionShot to an overhead lamp as Kirk kisses a SexSlave girl who's been "ordered to please" him[[note]]A line that was cut had Kirk drinking wine and saying "good," eating something and saying "excellent," and then -- "And you?" and the woman says "Superb, I'm told."[[/note]]; and Kirk sitting up in bed taking a call from the bridge, the woman lying next to him, she rolls over and sits up.



* BrainwashedAndCrazy: Numerous episodes.

to:

* BrainwashedAndCrazy: Numerous This happens in numerous episodes.



* BreakoutCharacter: Spock became the fan favorite almost instantly, and the only way to keep Creator/WilliamShatner from raising a stink and leaving the series was for the writers to emphasize his [[TrueCompanions close co-worker/friend relationship with Kirk]] [[note]]this was actually suggested by Creator/IsaacAsimov in [[http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/06/getting-star-trek-on-air-was-impossible.html this letter to Roddenberry]][[/note]]; later, the PowerTrio of Spock, Kirk and [=McCoy=].

to:

* BreakoutCharacter: Spock became the fan favorite almost instantly, and the only way to keep Creator/WilliamShatner from raising a stink and leaving the series focus on the captain was for the writers to emphasize his [[TrueCompanions close co-worker/friend relationship with Kirk]] [[note]]this was actually suggested by Creator/IsaacAsimov in [[http://www.lettersofnote.com/2012/06/getting-star-trek-on-air-was-impossible.html this letter to Roddenberry]][[/note]]; later, this dynamic evolved into the PowerTrio of Spock, Kirk [[TheSpock Spock]], [[TheKirk Kirk]] and [=McCoy=].[[TheMcCoy McCoy]].



** Chekov does more screaming-in-pain than the rest of the crew combined. He even has a [[ColdBloodedTorture torture]] scene in the episode "Mirror, Mirror". This was explained as a convenient way to show there was mortal peril. Apparently, Kirk, Spock and [=McCoy=] all being older, dignified men would have made it improper for them to scream, but Chekov is in his early twenties and still very boyish, so it's all right for him. Doesn't make it any easier on the poor guy, though. In a nice inversion, he's the only one who ''doesn't'' get hit with the aging disease in "The Deadly Years". He still ends up getting subjected to a thousand and one medical checks, though.

to:

** Chekov does more screaming-in-pain than the rest of the crew combined. He even has a [[ColdBloodedTorture torture]] scene in the episode "Mirror, Mirror". This was explained as a convenient way to show there was mortal peril. Apparently, Kirk, Spock and [=McCoy=] all being older, dignified men would have made it improper for them to scream, but Chekov is in his early twenties and still very boyish, so it's all right for him. Doesn't make it any easier on the poor guy, though. In a nice inversion, he's the only one who ''doesn't'' get hit with the aging disease in "The Deadly Years". He still ends up getting subjected to a thousand and one medical checks, though.



** Sometimes Scotty, whenever he's left in charge of the ''Enterprise.''



** The Saurians were later established in ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'' to be lizard people; there were a couple of them on the Big E.

to:

** The Saurians were later established in ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'' to be lizard people; there were a couple of them on the Big E.''Enterprise''.



* ClothingDamage: Kirk must have a pretty steep uniform allowance to cover all of those shirts that get torn up (or completely torn off of him). An unintended case can be seen in "The Savage Curtain" when Kirk's pants split open in the back for a [[IncrediblyLamePun brief moment]].
* CloudCuckoolander: Chekov and his constant references to GloriousMotherRussia, which appear to only make sense in his mind. To a lesser extent, Sulu and his FleetingPassionateHobbies, which the rest of the crew regard as [[FanOfThePast unusual for the time period.]]

to:

* ClothingDamage: Kirk must have a pretty steep uniform allowance to cover all of those shirts that get torn up (or completely torn off of him). An unintended case can be seen in "The Savage Curtain" when Kirk's pants split open in the back for a [[IncrediblyLamePun brief moment]].
* CloudCuckoolander: Chekov and his constant references to GloriousMotherRussia, which appear to only make sense in his mind. To a lesser extent, Sulu and his FleetingPassionateHobbies, which the rest of the crew regard as [[FanOfThePast unusual for the time period.]]
brief]] moment.



* FanOfThePast: Sulu and his FleetingPassionateHobbies, which the rest of the crew regard as unusual for the time period.



* TheGadfly: Chekov and his constant, [[InsaneTrollLogic deliberately erroneous]] references to GloriousMotherRussia. It's made very clear that he only does it to mess with people's heads.



* TheMainCharactersDoEverything: Kirk and his highest bridge officers beam into danger in every episode, despite the presence of [[RedShirt specialists]] on board for that purpose. At least when [=McCoy=] is in the landing party, Dr. M'Benga covers in Sickbay as acting CMO.

to:

* TheMainCharactersDoEverything: Kirk and his highest bridge officers often beam into danger in every episode, despite the presence of [[RedShirt [[TalentedButTrained specialists]] on board for that purpose. At least when [=McCoy=] is in the landing party, Dr. M'Benga covers in Sickbay as acting CMO.purpose.


** "'''What''' the hell did he just say?": ''Franchise/StarTrek'' damn near invented {{Technobabble}}.


* TechnoBabble: Although not as bad as later series, there is still a lot. Remember, this is the show that invented the PolarityReversal.

to:

* TechnicolorDeath: Anyone killed by a phaser weapon set to "disrupt" [[https://youtu.be/EvI_FYarYIY?t=60 will experience this]].
* TechnoBabble: Although not as bad as later series, there is still Interestingly for a lot. Remember, Star Trek show, outside of a few rare occurrences, this trope is ''[[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness almost never used]]''. Instead, any technological devices are merely referred to by their explicit functions whenever they are used by the show plot. (So, a Photon Torpedo is a [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin torpedo that invented the PolarityReversal.releases photons]], as opposed to a "[[ExpospeakGag 10 isoton thermolytic warhead encased in a rectified multiphasic matrix]]") It wouldn't be until Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration that Techno-babble became a major trope in Star Trek.



* TeensAreMonsters: Charlie in "Charlie X." Being a juvenile RealityWarper with boundary issues doesn't help, though he does turn out to have a serious FreudianExcuse.

to:

* TeensAreMonsters: Charlie in "Charlie X." Being a juvenile RealityWarper with boundary issues doesn't help, though he does turn out to have a serious FreudianExcuse.FreudianExcuse for his actions.

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