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* SidelinedProtagonistCrossover: In one episode, Fonzie needs some help defeating a gang so he [[RequiredSpinOffCrossover calls on his good friend]] Carmine Ragusa, the Golden Gloves boxing champion and a character introduced in the SpinOff ''Series/LaverneAndShirley''.


* BreakoutCharacter: This trope used to be ''CALLED'' "The Fonzie", and Fonz remains the yardstick by which applicability of this trope to a character is measured. He went from an occasionally glimpsed greaser character to a centerpiece of the show thanks to his tough persona and catchprases, to finally the ''main'' character of the show. The network even wanted to rename the show ''Fonzie's Happy Days'' in the later seasons, and only didn't because Creator/HenryWinkler objected -- he felt that Ron Howard was the real star.

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* BreakoutCharacter: This trope used to be ''CALLED'' "The Fonzie", and Fonz remains the yardstick by which applicability of this trope to a character is measured. He went from an occasionally glimpsed greaser character to a centerpiece of the show thanks to his tough persona and catchprases, to finally the ''main'' character of the show. The network even wanted to rename the show ''Fonzie's Happy Days'' in the later seasons, and only didn't because Creator/HenryWinkler objected -- he felt (probably correctly) that Ron Howard was the real star.



** Fonzie appeared far less often or was less essential to the plots. The show was more focused on the Cunninghams, Richie in particular. Fonzie early on was also much more of a jerk than most people know him to be, when he became the all around good guy after becoming a major character. Possibly explained/retconned in a later episode detailing how Richie met him.
** In many of the first season episodes, perhaps due to ABC's demands, Fonzie wore a greyish windbreaker instead of his black leather jacket.

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** Fonzie appeared far less often or was less essential to the plots. The show was more focused on the Cunninghams, Richie in particular. Fonzie early on was also much more of a jerk than most people know him to be, when he became the all around good guy after becoming a major character.character; for example, in "Fonzie Drops In", Fonzie goes back to high school and attempts to cheat on a test. A plot like this wouldn't happen later on, when Fonzie would become a role model. Possibly explained/retconned in a later episode detailing how Richie met him.
** In many of the first season episodes, perhaps due to ABC's demands, Fonzie wore a greyish windbreaker instead of his black leather jacket.



** TheFifties nostalgia was crucial to most of the first two seasons; notable examples include ''The Not Making of a President'' in which the conflict centered on the Eisenhower/Stevenson presidential race, and ''The Series/HowdyDoody Show'' which centered on Joanie's appearance on the titular children's show. Roughly concurrently with the move to multi-camera production, the nostalgia factor began to wane. By the last seasons, it was as much a surprise as an expectation when the original era was referenced.



** In "Fonzie Drops In", Fonzie goes back to high school and attempts to cheat on a test. A plot like this wouldn't happen later on, when Fonzie would become a role model.

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* ParentalFashionVeto: In the episode "The Fonz is Allergic to Girls" (the title MakesSenseInContext), Joanie Cunningham is going to a party with a towel wrapped around her but she's actually wearing clothes underneath it. Howard, her father, tells her not to go to the party like that but lets her go when she reveals that she's wearing clothes under the towel.


* DemotedToExtra:
** Potsie, initially one of the major characters as Richie's best friend, was even featured in the original ''Love, American Style'' precursor to the show. As Fonzie took on the role of Richie's brotherly figure, Potsie became less important to storylines, and instead was paired alongside Ralph Malph as ThoseTwoGuys. He stuck around when Richie and Ralph left the series to join the Army, in various different roles, before joining Howard's Leopard Lodge and getting a job at Cunningham Hardware. Unfortunately, he all but vanished by the last season, in which he only appeared in six episodes, not including the finale, and no explanation was given for his absence. Despite these sporadic guest appearances in Season 11, he was only demoted to co-star status in the opening credits.
** Lori-Beth became Richie's steady girl in one of the opening episodes of Season 5. When Richie left to join the Army in Greenland, she stuck around, getting married to him over the phone, and giving birth to Richie's son when he was away. Eventually, she pretty much just stopped appearing entirely unless it was a special occasion, having little way to play off the others. Finally, in one of the episodes of the final season, she was given the chance to properly leave the show by joining Richie and Richie, Jr. in moving to California, so that Richie could pursue his dream of becoming a screenwriter.



* TheHerosBirthday: "The Second Anniversary Show", "The Sixth Sense", "Hi-Yo Fonzie, Away!" all focused on his birthday.

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* %%* TheHerosBirthday: "The Second Anniversary Show", "The Sixth Sense", "Hi-Yo Fonzie, Away!" all focused on his birthday.


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* OutOfFocus:
** Potsie, initially one of the major characters as Richie's best friend, was even featured in the original ''Love, American Style'' precursor to the show. As Fonzie took on the role of Richie's brotherly figure, Potsie became less important to storylines, and instead was paired alongside Ralph Malph as ThoseTwoGuys. He stuck around when Richie and Ralph left the series to join the Army, in various different roles, before joining Howard's Leopard Lodge and getting a job at Cunningham Hardware. Unfortunately, he all but vanished by the last season, in which he only appeared in six episodes, not including the finale, and no explanation was given for his absence. Despite these sporadic guest appearances in Season 11, he was only demoted to co-star status in the opening credits.
** Lori-Beth became Richie's steady girl in one of the opening episodes of Season 5. When Richie left to join the Army in Greenland, she stuck around, getting married to him over the phone, and giving birth to Richie's son when he was away. Eventually, she pretty much just stopped appearing entirely unless it was a special occasion, having little way to play off the others. Finally, in one of the episodes of the final season, she was given the chance to properly leave the show by joining Richie and Richie, Jr. in moving to California, so that Richie could pursue his dream of becoming a screenwriter.


* BoundAndGagged: Potsie and Ralph in "Fonzie's Funeral Part 2".

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* %%* BoundAndGagged: Potsie and Ralph in "Fonzie's Funeral Part 2".

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* BoundAndGagged: Potsie and Ralph in "Fonzie's Funeral Part 2".


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* DoubleDate: Fonzie and Richie with Series/LaverneAndShirley in "A Date with Fonzie."


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* TheHerosBirthday: "The Second Anniversary Show", "The Sixth Sense", "Hi-Yo Fonzie, Away!" all focused on his birthday.


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* AHouseDivided: Richie with Ralph and Potsie in "The Apartment", when he finds their increasingly outrageous antics difficult to live with.


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* PottyEmergency: Implied at the end of "The Motorcycle", when Fonzie says that he "has to go" after being tied up for six hours.


* ''Happy Days: The Musical'', a 2008 [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin musical]] written by Garry Marshall himself, with music by Music/PaulWilliams. It takes place somewhere around Season 4 and follows Richie and Fonzie as they try to save Arnold's from being torn down to create space for a shopping mall. The show has the same light, affectionate tone as the show with a little bit of the edge of similar nostalgic musicals like ''Theatre/{{Grease}}'' and ''Theatre/{{Hairspray}}''.

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* ''Happy Days: The A New Musical'', a 2008 [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin musical]] written by Garry Marshall himself, with music by Music/PaulWilliams. It takes place somewhere around Season 4 and follows Richie and Fonzie as they try to save Arnold's from being torn down to create space for a shopping mall. The show has the same light, affectionate tone as the show with a little bit of the edge of similar nostalgic musicals like ''Theatre/{{Grease}}'' and ''Theatre/{{Hairspray}}''.


* ''Happy Days: The Arena Spectacular'', which toured Australia during the late-1990s, and featured native pop group Human Nature as a '50s rock band. The show saw a former girlfriend of Fonzie's, Miss Frost, wanting to buy Arnold's and develop the property. Notably, Tom Bosley (the series' Mr. C) presented an introduction live on-stage before every performance.

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* ''Happy Days: The Arena Spectacular'', which toured Australia during the late-1990s, and featured native pop group Human Nature as a '50s rock band. The show saw a former girlfriend one of Fonzie's, Fonzie's ex-girlfriends, Miss Frost, wanting to buy tear down Arnold's and develop redevelop the property. Notably, Tom Bosley (the series' Mr. C) presented an introduction live on-stage before every performance.


In 2010, a stage musical based on the show was first produced, written by Garry Marshall himself with music by Music/PaulWilliams. It takes place somewhere around Season 4 and follows Richie and Fonzie as they try to save Arnold's from being torn down to create space for a shopping mall. The show has the same light, affectionate tone as the show with a little bit of the edge of similar nostalgic musicals like ''Theatre/{{Grease}}'' and ''Theatre/{{Hairspray}}''.

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In 2010, a stage musical Two stageshows based on the series have been produced:
* ''Happy Days: The Arena Spectacular'', which toured Australia during the late-1990s, and featured native pop group Human Nature as a '50s rock band. The
show was first produced, saw a former girlfriend of Fonzie's, Miss Frost, wanting to buy Arnold's and develop the property. Notably, Tom Bosley (the series' Mr. C) presented an introduction live on-stage before every performance.
*''Happy Days: The Musical'', a 2008 [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin musical]]
written by Garry Marshall himself himself, with music by Music/PaulWilliams. It takes place somewhere around Season 4 and follows Richie and Fonzie as they try to save Arnold's from being torn down to create space for a shopping mall. The show has the same light, affectionate tone as the show with a little bit of the edge of similar nostalgic musicals like ''Theatre/{{Grease}}'' and ''Theatre/{{Hairspray}}''.


In 2010, a stage musical based on the show was first produced, written by Garry Marshall himself with music by Music/Paul Williams. It takes place somewhere around Season 4 and follows Richie and Fonzie as they try to save Arnold's from being torn down to create space for a shopping mall. The show has the same light, affectionate tone as the show with a little bit of the edge of similar nostalgic musicals like ''Theatre/{{Grease}}'' and ''Theatre/{{Hairspray}}''.

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In 2010, a stage musical based on the show was first produced, written by Garry Marshall himself with music by Music/Paul Williams.Music/PaulWilliams. It takes place somewhere around Season 4 and follows Richie and Fonzie as they try to save Arnold's from being torn down to create space for a shopping mall. The show has the same light, affectionate tone as the show with a little bit of the edge of similar nostalgic musicals like ''Theatre/{{Grease}}'' and ''Theatre/{{Hairspray}}''.

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In 2010, a stage musical based on the show was first produced, written by Garry Marshall himself with music by Music/Paul Williams. It takes place somewhere around Season 4 and follows Richie and Fonzie as they try to save Arnold's from being torn down to create space for a shopping mall. The show has the same light, affectionate tone as the show with a little bit of the edge of similar nostalgic musicals like ''Theatre/{{Grease}}'' and ''Theatre/{{Hairspray}}''.


** ReplacedTheThemeTune: ... after which came a new recording of an eponymous ThematicThemeTune that had originally been used for the show's closing credits. This theme, performed by Pratt & [=McClain=], was issued as a single in 1976 and became a Top 5 ''Billboard'' hit...

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** ReplacedTheThemeTune: ... after which came a new recording of an eponymous [[TitleThemeTune eponymous]] ThematicThemeTune that had originally been used for the show's closing credits. This theme, performed by Pratt & [=McClain=], was issued as a single in 1976 and became a Top 5 ''Billboard'' hit...

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* BirdPoopGag: In "Fonzie Drops In", a bird poops on Fonzie's documents.


Is a synopsis of ''Happy Days'' really necessary? America. 1955. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 565 North Clinton Drive. Hardware store owner and [[StandardFiftiesFather cardigan enthusiast]] Howard Cunningham (Tom Bosley) and his wife Marion (Marion Ross). [[ButtMonkey Gee-whiz]] college sophomore Richie (Creator/RonHoward). [[{{Tsundere}} Sweet-and-sour]] little sister Joanie (Erin Moran). And most importantly: Cunningham boarder, auto mechanic, philosopher, epitome of '50s greaser cool, a sensitive soul underneath all that burly leather, with a supernatural gift for starting up any machine with [[PercussiveMaintenance a tap of his fist]] or shagging a parade of ladies with [[BadassFingerSnap a simple snap of his fingers]], descended god, Arthur A.K.'''''AYYYYYYY!''''' "Fonzie/The Fonz" Fonzarelli (Creator/HenryWinkler).

The early seasons were centered on squeaky-clean Richie who constantly gets into trouble through circumstance, but is usually bailed out by his parents or the super-cool Fonz. Fonzie was a former street hoodlum (a pastiche of '50s greasers) who mentored Richie and his pals Ralph Malph (Don Most) and Potsie Webber (Anson Williams) whenever he could, while trying not to lose his tough-guy edge. Of course, later seasons would see Fonzie approach [[InvincibleHero Kryptonian-like status]] and increasingly be used to promote [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle social good]] -- a change made out of necessity by Winkler and the producers, who fretted over the hood's popularity with children.

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Is The show started out as a synopsis of ''Happy Days'' really necessary? America. 1955. nostalgic look at 1950s America, centered largely on [[ButtMonkey gee-whiz]] high school student Richie Cunningham (Creator/RonHoward) and his friends, family, and overall daily life in 1955 Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 565 North Clinton Drive. Hardware Said family included Richie's parents -- his father, hardware store owner and [[StandardFiftiesFather cardigan enthusiast]] Howard Cunningham (Tom Bosley) Bosley), and his wife mother, housewife extraordinaire Marion (Marion Ross). [[ButtMonkey Gee-whiz]] college sophomore Richie (Creator/RonHoward). Ross) -- plus his [[{{Tsundere}} Sweet-and-sour]] sweet-and-sour]] little sister Joanie (Erin Moran). And most importantly: Cunningham boarder, auto mechanic, philosopher, epitome of '50s greaser cool, a sensitive soul underneath all that burly leather, with a supernatural gift Moran) and, [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome initially]], his basketball-playing slacker older brother Chuck (Gavan O'Herlihy[[note]]in season one[[/note]] and Randolph Roberts[[note]]in season two[[/note]]). But the show ended up becoming incredibly popular for starting up any machine with [[PercussiveMaintenance a tap of his fist]] or shagging a parade of ladies with [[BadassFingerSnap a simple snap of his fingers]], descended god, [[BreakoutCharacter being the home of]] Arthur A.K.'''''AYYYYYYY!''''' "Fonzie/The Fonz" Fonzarelli (Creator/HenryWinkler).

(Creator/HenryWinkler), initially a soft-spoken greaser side character who eventually became the Cunninghams' boarder, an auto mechanic, ''the'' ladies man, and more or less a descended god -- in short, the epitome of '50s cool.

The early seasons were centered on squeaky-clean Richie who constantly gets into trouble through circumstance, but is usually bailed out by his parents or the super-cool Fonz. Fonzie was a former street hoodlum (a pastiche of '50s greasers) who mentored Richie and his pals Ralph Malph (Don Most) and Potsie Webber Weber (Anson Williams) whenever he could, while trying not to lose his tough-guy edge. Of course, later seasons would see Fonzie approach [[InvincibleHero Kryptonian-like status]] and increasingly be used to promote [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle social good]] -- a change made out of necessity by Winkler and the producers, who fretted over the hood's popularity with children.

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*** Not just a different look, a different name: In the first episode, it's called Arthur's.

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