Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Series / FifteenToOne

Go To



* AuthorFilibuster: Stewart once quipped that should the first round ever eliminate twelve people, he'd fill the time that would otherwise have been used for the second round by speaking about the Elgin Marbles. In 1996, he got the chance to use the programme as a device to deliver an hour-long lecture, complete with fifteen replicas of the Marbles at the podia in the place of contestants.

to:

* AuthorFilibuster: Stewart once quipped that should the first round ever eliminate twelve people, he'd fill the time that would otherwise have been used for the second round by speaking about the Elgin Marbles. In 1996, he got the chance to use the programme as a device to deliver an hour-long lecture, complete with fifteen replicas of the Marbles at the podia in the place of contestants.contestants (although this resulted in Channel 4 getting slapped down by the Independent Television Commission, the precursor to Ofcom, as the speech -- which made the case for the Marbles to be returned to Greece -- was not impartial and no alternative point of view was offered).


* '''Round 3''' (also known as '''The Final'''): The remaining three players were given one point for every life they had left and were restored to three lives. The round had 40 questions. A wrong answer cost one life (losing three lives eliminated you, regardless of your score), while correct answers scored 10 points. The questions were played on the buzzers until one player gave three correct answers. After that, the player had a choice to take the next question themselves or nominate someone else to take it. Taking a question and giving a wrong answer put the game back on the buzzer, while nominating someone else and them giving a right answer would give them control. The last player left, or the one with the highest score after the 40 questions were exhausted, was the winner. They were given 10 bonus points for any lives they had left to determine their position on the Finals Board. (In the Grand Final it was much simpler: All 40 questions were on the buzzer.)

to:

* '''Round 3''' (also known as '''The Final'''): The remaining three players were given one point for every life they had left and were restored to three lives. The round had 40 questions. A wrong answer cost one life (losing three lives eliminated you, regardless of your score), while correct answers scored 10 points. The questions were played on the buzzers until one player gave three correct answers. After that, the player had a choice to take the next question themselves or nominate someone else to take it. Taking a question and giving a wrong answer put the game back on the buzzer, while nominating someone else and them giving a right answer would give them control. The last player left, or the one with the highest score after the 40 questions were exhausted, was the winner. They were given winner; in the first case, that player could keep answering questions at 10 points a pop until they either lost all their lives or went through all the questions. In either case, the winner received 10 bonus points for any lives every life they had left to determine their position on the Finals Board. (In the Grand Final it was much simpler: All 40 questions were on the buzzer.)


* '''Round 3''' (also known as '''The Final'''): The remaining three players were given one point for every life they had left and were restored to three lives. The round had 40 questions. A wrong answer cost one life (losing three lives eliminated you, regardless of your score), while correct answers scored 10 points. The questions were played on the buzzers until one player gave three correct answers. After that, the player had a choice to take the next question themselves or nominate someone else to take it. Taking a question and giving a wrong answer put the game back on the buzzer, while nominating someone else and them giving a right answer would give them control. The last player left, or the one with the highest score after the 40 questions were exhausted, was the winner. (In the Grand Final it was much simpler: All 40 questions were on the buzzer.)

to:

* '''Round 3''' (also known as '''The Final'''): The remaining three players were given one point for every life they had left and were restored to three lives. The round had 40 questions. A wrong answer cost one life (losing three lives eliminated you, regardless of your score), while correct answers scored 10 points. The questions were played on the buzzers until one player gave three correct answers. After that, the player had a choice to take the next question themselves or nominate someone else to take it. Taking a question and giving a wrong answer put the game back on the buzzer, while nominating someone else and them giving a right answer would give them control. The last player left, or the one with the highest score after the 40 questions were exhausted, was the winner. They were given 10 bonus points for any lives they had left to determine their position on the Finals Board. (In the Grand Final it was much simpler: All 40 questions were on the buzzer.)

Added DiffLines:

** The "Millennium Quiz" special on Christmas Day 1999 invited back 25 past contestants to compete in a four-round contest. As in the Schools edition, scores determined who advanced or dropped, and lives were only used once the field had been narrowed to three for the final. The winner received a silver trophy.


* [[AndYourRewardIsClothes And Your Reward Is Pottery]]: The prize for winning a Grand Final in the original run was a piece of ancient pottery. Finishing the series with the highest score on the Finals Board netted some glassware.

to:

* [[AndYourRewardIsClothes And Your Reward Is Pottery]]: The prize for winning a Grand Final in the original run was a piece of ancient pottery. Finishing the series with the highest score on the Finals Board netted some glassware.a trophy.



** Averted in the revival; the Grand Final winner takes home £40,000 in cash.

to:

** The prize in the "Millennium Quiz" special (December 25, 1999) was a silver trophy.
** Averted in the revival; individual episode winners get a trophy, and the Grand Final winner takes home £40,000 in cash.

Added DiffLines:


Hosted by William G. Stewart during its original run, then revived for a special celebrity episode in 2013 hosted by Adam Hills. This in turn led to a revival of the regular series, which began airing in 2014 and is hosted by Sandi Toksvig.


* [[AndYourRewardIsClothes And Your Reward Is Pottery]]: The prize for winning the Grand Final was a piece of ancient pottery. Finishing the series with the highest score on the Finals Board netted some glassware.

to:

* [[AndYourRewardIsClothes And Your Reward Is Pottery]]: The prize for winning the a Grand Final in the original run was a piece of ancient pottery. Finishing the series with the highest score on the Finals Board netted some glassware.



** Averted in the revival; the Grand Final winner takes home £40,000 in cash.



** Fifteen people "are all here to play ''Fifteen To One''"

to:

** Fifteen people "are all here to play ''Fifteen To One''"to One''."



** "You'll need to see this as well as hear it"

to:

** "You'll need to see this as well as hear it"it."


* LongRunner: The original run lasted for 15 years, fittingly.


A quiz show that aired on Britain's {{Channel 4}} for (fittingly) 15 years, from 1988 to 2003. Fifteen contestants started out with three lives each, and getting a question wrong lost a life. The idea was basically to be the last one standing. (Oh, and if you actually made it to the final round, attain a high enough score to get on the Finals Board and hopefully qualify for the Grand Final.)

to:

A quiz show that aired on Britain's {{Channel 4}} Creator/Channel4 for (fittingly) 15 years, from 1988 to 2003. Fifteen contestants started out with three lives each, and getting a question wrong lost a life. The idea was basically to be the last one standing. (Oh, and if you actually made it to the final round, attain a high enough score to get on the Finals Board and hopefully qualify for the Grand Final.)


!!GameShow Tropes in use:

to:

!!GameShow Tropes !!GameShowTropes in use:

Added DiffLines:

* SharpDressedMan: William G Stewart always wore a selection of suits during the original series. Many of the male contestants likewise wore suits. Less evident in the revival.


** Voiceovers were handled by Anthony Hyde, with Laura Calland taking over towards the end of 1989.

to:

** Voiceovers were originally handled by Anthony Hyde, with Laura Calland taking over towards the end of 1989.



** While it never happened, the result of Round 1 sometimes teetered close to making Round 2 completely worthless. The worst result at the end of Round 1 was 11 down, 4 to go, which left a lot of time to fill at the end of the show.
** On the other hand, the time a contestant won Round 3 with a score of 10 (as his opponents had knocked themselves out). He refused the invitation winners normally got to come back in the next series.

to:

** While it never happened, the result of Round 1 sometimes teetered close to making Round 2 completely worthless. The worst ever result at the end of Round 1 was 11 down, 4 to go, which still left a lot of time to fill at the end of the show.
** On the other hand, end of the programme, the time a contestant won Round 3 with a score of 10 (as his opponents had knocked themselves out). He refused declined the invitation winners normally got to come back in the next series.


** Round 2: "[Player], we start with you. Give me a wrong answer and we go to [next player]; give me a right answer and we can start nominating."
** Round 3: "3 correct answers opens the game up, then after that it's "Question or Nominate."" In the first series with the "Round 2 lives earn 1 point each" system, this was preceded with an explanation along the lines of "your lives from Round 2 now form part of your final score."

to:

** Round 2: "[Player], we start with you.you face the first question. Give me a wrong answer and we go to [next player]; give me a right answer and we can start nominating."
** Round 3: "3 correct answers opens the game up, then after that it's "Question or Nominate."" In the first early series with the "Round 2 lives earn 1 point each" system, this was preceded with an explanation along the lines of "your lives from Round 2 now form part of your final score."



* CatchPhrase: Almost every episode would adhere to the same terse script. Hence almost every segment has recurring phrases.

to:

* CatchPhrase: Almost As seen [[http://web.archive.org/web/20041217060242/http://www.quizplayers.com/quizplayers/fifteen_to_one/catchphrases.html here]], almost every episode would adhere to the same terse script. Hence almost every segment has recurring phrases.


* ObviousRulePatch: Called for in unique, or at the most occasional, situations.

to:

* ObviousRulePatch: Called Mostly called for in unique, or at the most occasional, situations.


Added DiffLines:

** A further Grand Final change in the revival opened up questions that a player got wrong to the others to answer.
** A more permanent change: From about 2000 on, in Round 2, players who just got control were no longer allowed to nominate the player that just nominated them unless they nominated someone else first.

Added DiffLines:

** Round 1: "Two questions each in the first round; one correct answer from you to survive."
** Round 2: "[Player], we start with you. Give me a wrong answer and we go to [next player]; give me a right answer and we can start nominating."
** Round 3: "3 correct answers opens the game up, then after that it's "Question or Nominate."" In the first series with the "Round 2 lives earn 1 point each" system, this was preceded with an explanation along the lines of "your lives from Round 2 now form part of your final score."


Added DiffLines:

* ObviousRulePatch: Called for in unique, or at the most occasional, situations.
** The celebrity specials in the original run stopped anyone from being eliminated in Round 1 to accommodate the longer running time; instead, players who got both their questions wrong started off Round 2 with 1 life.
** The change to "everything on the buzzer" for the Grand Final, instituted after the regular format led to players nominating each other to get everyone to lose their lives.


Added DiffLines:

** In the late series of the original run, anyone who was eliminated in Round 1 didn't get to stay on stage for Round 2; instead, Stewart said "those [however many players lost their lives] must now leave us," with said players then shuffling past those who hadn't been eliminated.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 28

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report