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[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/earthflight.png]]


* AustralianWildlife: Rainbow lorikeets, cockatoos, budgerigars, and black falcons.


* BigDamnHeroes: Though unintentional on their part, in both the third and fifth episodes [[spoiler:mobbing crows save other birds from birds of prey]].



* CreepyCrows: Crows are shown mobbing certain birds of prey, and some Japanese crows feed alongside the cranes in the fifth episode.

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* TheCavalry: Though unintentional on their part, in both the third and fifth episodes [[spoiler:mobbing crows save other birds from birds of prey]].
* CreepyCrows: Crows are shown mobbing certain birds of prey, and some Japanese crows feed alongside the cranes in the fifth episode.prey.


* BigBadassBirdOfPrey: At least one per episode, including bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, African fish eagles, steppe eagles, golden eagles, peregrine falcons, osprey, harpy eagles, long-legged buzzards, black falcons, Steller's sea eagles, and white-tailed sea eagles.


* CreepyCrows: Crows are shown mobbing certain birds of prey, and some Japanese crows feed alongside the cranes in the fifth episode.



* RavensAndCrows: Crows are shown mobbing certain birds of prey, and some Japanese crows feed alongside the cranes in the fifth episode.


'''''Earthflight''''' is a BBC One six-part documentary that aired from late 2011 to early 2012. It uses various innovative techniques, such as cameras strapped to the backs of birds and filming from aircraft, to capture spectacular footage of flying birds from around the world, with each episode focusing on birds from a different continent (except for the last episode, which discusses the methods used to create the show). It is narrated by DavidTennant.

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'''''Earthflight''''' is a BBC One six-part documentary that aired from late 2011 to early 2012. It uses various innovative techniques, such as cameras strapped to the backs of birds and filming from aircraft, to capture spectacular footage of flying birds from around the world, with each episode focusing on birds from a different continent (except for the last episode, which discusses the methods used to create the show). It is narrated by DavidTennant.Creator/DavidTennant.


* BearsAreBadNews:
** Played straight by the polar bear in the third episode.
** Subverted by the grizzly bears in the first episode, which the bald eagles use to provide them with salmon, and the brown bears in the third episode that are just there to feed on scraps left over by an osprey.



* EverythingsWorseWithBears: Played straight by the polar bear in the third episode.
** Subverted by the grizzly bears in the first episode, which the bald eagles use to provide them with salmon, and the brown bears in the third episode that are just there to feed on scraps left over by an osprey.

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* EnemyMine: Lions may catch an unwary vulture when there is nothing else to eat, but both follow one another to locate carcasses.


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* SeldomSeenSpecies: A number of fairly obscure birds are featured.

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* EarnYourHappyEnding: The flamingos.


* BiggerIsBetter: Andean condors easily displace other scavenging birds at carcasses.



* GroinAttack: Male guanacos do this when they fight among themselves.



** Foxes are implied to be a threat to said cranes as well as Andean condors, both very large birds.



* NeverSmileAtACrocodile: The crocodiles in the wildebeest migration sequence (as usual). They pose less of a direct threat to the scavenging birds, but they do compete with them for carcasses.

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* NeverSmileAtACrocodile: The crocodiles in the wildebeest migration sequence (as usual). They pose less of a direct threat to the scavenging birds, but they do compete with them for carcasses. The caimans in the fourth episode aren't shown threatening the birds they feed alongside either.

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* KillerRabbit: Japanese cranes can defend themselves from sea eagles.

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* LightningBruiser: The speed attacks of peregrine and lanner falcons allow them to take down much larger birds such as cranes.


** The gannets, dolphins, and other marine predators against a school of fish.

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** The gannets, dolphins, and other marine predators against a school of fish.fish.
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* AustralianWildlife: Rainbow lorikeets, cockatoos, budgerigars, and black falcons.


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* ButtMonkey: The flamingoes in the second episode can't catch a break. No matter which lake they fly to they are constantly at risk from fish eagles, hyenas, and baboons.

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* ProperlyParanoid: The reluctance of the scarlet macaws to land on the ground in the fourth episode proves to be well founded due to the presence of predators.

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