Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Series / Connections

Go To


Added DiffLines:

* TheSimpleLifeIsSimple: Defied; in the first episode, Burke makes a point of deconstructing the idea that fleeing the cities for the farms in the event of a civilization-ending catastrophe would be [[CosyCatastrophe either easy or painless]], pointing out that the same infrastructure that supports modern urban life has also transformed the way modern farming works, and that post-apocalyptic agriculture would be laborious, back-breaking work. He uses this as a jumping-off point to explore how the development of agriculture enabled the rise of civilization as we know it in the first place.


* InsaneTrollLogic: Going into how, at one point, despite a strong domestic grain growing industry, and the availability of dirt cheap grain and flour from America, the average German at the time couldn't get basic bread. [[note]]The general gist was that the powers that be were blocking the cheap imports, but then turning around and selling off the domestic harvest in foreign trade.[[/note]]

to:

* InsaneTrollLogic: Going Not from Burke himself but one of his subjects, going into how, at one point, despite a strong domestic grain growing industry, and the availability of dirt cheap grain and flour from America, the average German at the time couldn't get basic bread. [[note]]The general gist was that the powers that be were blocking the cheap imports, but then turning around and selling off the domestic harvest in foreign trade.[[/note]]


Though not strictly a sequel, the 1985 series ''The Day The Universe Changed'', subtitled "A Personal View", used the same style and techniques, this time tracing paths not to specific inventions, but to aspects of modern society: modern medicine, credit, having a specific field of expertise rather than being a generic [[TVGenius TV Genius]], the notion of "progress" and the like.

to:

Though not strictly a sequel, the 1985 series ''The Day The Universe Changed'', subtitled "A Personal View", used the same style and techniques, this time tracing paths not to specific inventions, but to aspects of modern society: society in its philosophical aspects: modern medicine, credit, having a specific field of expertise rather than being a generic [[TVGenius TV Genius]], the notion of "progress" and the like.


* ShoutOut: ''The Day the Universe Changed'' is subtitled "A Personal View," as was Sir Kenneth Clark's series ''Civilisation,'' which set the form for these sort of multi-episode documentary miniseries.

to:

* ShoutOut: ''The Day the Universe Changed'' is subtitled "A Personal View," as was Sir Kenneth Clark's series ''Civilisation,'' which set the form for these sort of multi-episode documentary miniseries. Later, Carl Sagan would tweak his ShoutOut just a bit with ''[[{{Series/Cosmos}} Cosmos: A Personal Voyage]]''.

Added DiffLines:

* ShoutOut: ''The Day the Universe Changed'' is subtitled "A Personal View," as was Sir Kenneth Clark's series ''Civilisation,'' which set the form for these sort of multi-episode documentary miniseries.


* OminousLatinChanting: There is liberal use of "O Fortuna" from Music/CarminaBurana in the original series, most noticeable during the last episode of the first season.


Added DiffLines:

* OminousLatinChanting: There is liberal use of "O Fortuna" from Music/CarminaBurana in the original series, most noticeable during the last episode of the first season.


Well-regarded 1978
documentary series by British science and technology journalist and historian of science James Burke. Subtitled "An Alternative View of Change", ''Connections'' presented what would come to be known as the web theory of history, rejecting the straight-line notion of technological progress, instead presenting major aspects of the modern world as the end product of long [[WikiWalk strings of happy accidents]] where the historical context causes two otherwise unrelated tracks to run into each other (for example, he attributes rocketry in large part to the coincidence of a meat shortage in England with malaria in the Florida swamps). The series traced paths leading to radar, the atom bomb, the computer, television, plastic, the production line, and similar installments in the modern world.

to:

Well-regarded 1978
1978 documentary series by British science and technology journalist and historian of science James Burke. Subtitled "An Alternative View of Change", ''Connections'' presented what would come to be known as the web theory of history, rejecting the straight-line notion of technological progress, instead presenting major aspects of the modern world as the end product of long [[WikiWalk strings of happy accidents]] where the historical context causes two otherwise unrelated tracks to run into each other (for example, he attributes rocketry in large part to the coincidence of a meat shortage in England with malaria in the Florida swamps). The series traced paths leading to radar, the atom bomb, the computer, television, plastic, the production line, and similar installments in the modern world.


** And on the third hand, the reason for his lament about the companies rich enough to own computers would gain unprecedented power--the accumulation of data about people--actually ''has'' proven accurate in the form of Big Data (hello, Facebook Cambridge Analytica scandal!), albeit in a way he didn't foresee (and probably couldn't have even in 1985)[[note]]For reference, Mark Zuckerberg was ''born'' in 1984.[[/note]].

to:

** And on the third hand, the reason for his lament about the companies rich enough to own computers would gain unprecedented power--the accumulation of data about people--actually ''has'' proven accurate in the form of Big Data (hello, Facebook Cambridge Analytica scandal!), albeit in a way he didn't foresee (and probably couldn't have even in 1985)[[note]]For reference, Mark Zuckerberg was ''born'' in 1984.1984--he's the same age as the babies in the maternity ward at Pennsylvania Hospital seen in Episode 7 of ''The Day the Universe Changed''.[[/note]].


** And on the third hand, the reason for his lament about the companies rich enough to own computers would gain unprecedented power--the accumulation of data about people--actually ''has'' proven accurate in the form of Big Data (hello, Facebook Cambridge Analytica scandal!).

to:

** And on the third hand, the reason for his lament about the companies rich enough to own computers would gain unprecedented power--the accumulation of data about people--actually ''has'' proven accurate in the form of Big Data (hello, Facebook Cambridge Analytica scandal!).scandal!), albeit in a way he didn't foresee (and probably couldn't have even in 1985)[[note]]For reference, Mark Zuckerberg was ''born'' in 1984.[[/note]].

Added DiffLines:

** And on the third hand, the reason for his lament about the companies rich enough to own computers would gain unprecedented power--the accumulation of data about people--actually ''has'' proven accurate in the form of Big Data (hello, Facebook Cambridge Analytica scandal!).


* AuthorAllusion: A subtle one in the opening of the ninth episode of the 1978 series ("Countdown"), in which Burke, standing by the launch tower at Complex 38 at Cape Canaveral, talks about how the sight of it "brings back—as fresh as if it were yesterday—one of the most profoundly moving events of our lives". He was of course talking about the launch of [[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} Apollo 11]], for which he had been present as a correspondent for the BBC in 1969 (which is what his British audience nine years later would have known him best from).

to:

* AuthorAllusion: [[ActorAllusion Author Allusion]]: A subtle one in the opening of the ninth episode of the 1978 series ("Countdown"), in which Burke, standing by the launch tower at Complex 38 at Cape Canaveral, talks about how the sight of it "brings back—as fresh as if it were yesterday—one of the most profoundly moving events of our lives". He was of course talking about the launch of [[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} Apollo 11]], for which he had been present as a correspondent for the BBC in 1969 (which is what his British audience nine years later would have known him best from).


Well-regarded 1978 documentary series by British science and technology journalist and historian of science James Burke. Subtitled "An Alternative View of Change", ''Connections'' presented what would come to be known as the web theory of history, rejecting the straight-line notion of technological progress, instead presenting major aspects of the modern world as the end product of long [[WikiWalk strings of happy accidents]] where the historical context causes two otherwise unrelated tracks to run into each other (for example, he attributes rocketry in large part to the coincidence of a meat shortage in England with malaria in the Florida swamps). The series traced paths leading to radar, the atom bomb, the computer, television, plastic, the production line, and similar installments in the modern world.

to:

Well-regarded 1978 1978
documentary series by British science and technology journalist and historian of science James Burke. Subtitled "An Alternative View of Change", ''Connections'' presented what would come to be known as the web theory of history, rejecting the straight-line notion of technological progress, instead presenting major aspects of the modern world as the end product of long [[WikiWalk strings of happy accidents]] where the historical context causes two otherwise unrelated tracks to run into each other (for example, he attributes rocketry in large part to the coincidence of a meat shortage in England with malaria in the Florida swamps). The series traced paths leading to radar, the atom bomb, the computer, television, plastic, the production line, and similar installments in the modern world.


Added DiffLines:

* AuthorAllusion: A subtle one in the opening of the ninth episode of the 1978 series ("Countdown"), in which Burke, standing by the launch tower at Complex 38 at Cape Canaveral, talks about how the sight of it "brings back—as fresh as if it were yesterday—one of the most profoundly moving events of our lives". He was of course talking about the launch of [[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} Apollo 11]], for which he had been present as a correspondent for the BBC in 1969 (which is what his British audience nine years later would have known him best from).


In the 1990s, The Learning Channel produced two sequel series, ''Connections 2'' and ''Connections 3''. The sequels were paced much faster and did not go into the depth of the earlier offerings.

to:

In the 1990s, The Learning Channel produced two sequel series, ''Connections 2'' and ''Connections 3''. The sequels were paced much faster and did not go into the depth of the earlier offerings.
offerings. The beginning of each episode was connected to the last, and the final episode of each series linked back to the first, forming a closed circle.

Added DiffLines:

** "All that good stuff": Said at the end of a list of things, usually of not-that-good stuff.


* OminousLatinChanting: There is liberal use of O Fortuna from Music/CarminaBurana in the original series, most noticable during the last episode of the first season.

to:

* OminousLatinChanting: There is liberal use of O Fortuna "O Fortuna" from Music/CarminaBurana in the original series, most noticable noticeable during the last episode of the first season.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 43

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report