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** The NBC version had a limit of seven matches with no cap on winnings, for a theoretical maximum of $203,000.

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** The NBC version had a limit of seven matches with no cap on winnings, for a theoretical maximum of $203,000.$203,000 (excluding the $500 bonuses added later in the run, detailed in BonusSpace above).


** [[spoiler: Aziz from the series premiere of Joel's version changes a card into an eight, and bets low that the card will be lower. It's an ace, but that seems worth losing a low bet after using your ONE change in this version. However, he bets big on the Ace...and gets a Second Ace. He goes all-in on the second ace...and busts out when a THIRD STRAIGHT ACE comes out.]]

to:

** [[spoiler: Aziz from the series premiere of Joel's version changes a card into an eight, and bets low that the card will be lower. It's an ace, but that seems worth losing a low bet after using your ONE change in this version. However, he bets big on the Ace...and gets a Second Ace. He goes all-in on the second ace...and busts out when a THIRD STRAIGHT ACE comes out.]]


** The 2019 version which doesn't have returning champions seems to subtly not avert this trope. The players seem to be matched with the deck of cards that (sometimes pretty loosely) better matches the top of their outfit.

to:

** The 2019 version which doesn't have returning champions seems to subtly not avert play this trope. The players trope in a different way. Players seem to be get matched with the deck of cards that (sometimes pretty loosely) better matches resembles the color of the top of their outfit.

Added DiffLines:

** The 2019 version which doesn't have returning champions seems to subtly not avert this trope. The players seem to be matched with the deck of cards that (sometimes pretty loosely) better matches the top of their outfit.

Added DiffLines:

** The 2019 version reverts to having a push be a loss though.


* BonusRound: The Money Cards takes the same premise as the card portion of the main game, but adds an element of gambling. Starting with $200, the player faces three rows of cards, three on the bottom and middle, one on the top. They must wager at least $50 per card until either the final bet, the Big Bet, is played (the player must wager at least half of their total), or the contestant loses all of their money. The Perry run had $200 on each row for a maximum of $28,800, and the player could only change the first card in each row. The Eubanks/Rafferty run doubled the middle row for a maximum of $32,000. Originally, the player could change any card they wanted, later changed to once per row; in either case, three spare cards were provided. In the 2001 version, the middle row only had two cards (turning it into a pyramid), and each row had $700 tagged to it; the Big Bet was also renamed the Major Wager for this version. The 2019 revival instead has the Money Cards as a single row of seven cards, with no additional money added. The player bets using the $10,000 they won in the main game, and once they reach the final card, they can either walk away with their winnings or go for the Big Bet.

to:

* BonusRound: The Money Cards takes the same premise as the card portion of the main game, but adds an element of gambling. Starting with $200, the player faces three rows of cards, three on the bottom and middle, one on the top. They must wager at least $50 per card until either the final bet, the Big Bet, is played (the player must wager at least half of their total), or the contestant loses all of their money. The Perry run had $200 on each row for a maximum of $28,800, and the player could only change the first card in each row. The Eubanks/Rafferty run doubled the middle row for a maximum of $32,000. Originally, the player could change any card they wanted, later changed to once per row; in either case, three spare cards were provided. In the 2001 version, the middle row only had two cards (turning it into a pyramid), and each row had $700 tagged to it; the Big Bet was also renamed the Major Wager for this version. The 2019 revival instead has the Money Cards as a single row of seven cards, allowing one card change, with no additional money added. The player bets using the $10,000 they won in the main game, and once they reach the final card, they can either walk away with their winnings or go for the Big Bet.


A revival for Creator/{{ABC}} in summer 2019 [[https://www.vulture.com/2019/03/press-your-luck-card-sharks-reboots-abc.html has been announced]], alongside a reboot of ''Series/PressYourLuck''. It will be hosted by Joel [=McHale=].

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A revival for Creator/{{ABC}} revived the show in summer 2019 [[https://www.vulture.com/2019/03/press-your-luck-card-sharks-reboots-abc.html has been announced]], alongside a reboot of ''Series/PressYourLuck''. It will be hosted by 2019, with Joel [=McHale=].
[=McHale=] as host.


* {{Pilot}}: Three were taped in 1978, with a few differences from the series (different contestant podium, Johnny Olson announcing, etc.); the third was allegedly shot as a normal episode. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yAiHamteXE NBC actually used a shot from the second pilot as the show's tel-op slide]] (which would show up during technical issues). The Bullard version also had one, which still had the Chip Clips, but had two different rounds prior to the third round, which was the NBC/CBS main game.

to:

* {{Pilot}}: Three were taped in 1978, with a few differences from the series (different contestant podium, Johnny Olson announcing, etc.); the third was allegedly shot as a normal episode. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yAiHamteXE NBC actually used a shot from the second pilot as the show's tel-op slide]] (which would show up during technical issues). The Bullard version also had one, which still had the Chip Clips, but had two different rounds prior to the third round, which was the NBC/CBS main game.game (though it still used the same Clip Chip-esque "dilemmas" in lieu of survey questions).


* BonusRound: The Money Cards takes the same premise as the card portion of the main game, but adds an element of gambling. Starting with $200, the player faces three rows of cards, three on the bottom and middle, one on the top. They must wager at least $50 per card until either the final bet, the Big Bet, is played (the player must wager at least half of their total), or the contestant loses all of their money. The Perry run had $200 on each row for a maximum of $28,800, and the player could only change the first card in each row. The Eubanks/Rafferty run doubled the middle row for a maximum of $32,000. Originally, the player could change any card they wanted, later changed to once per row; in either case, three spare cards were provided. In the 2001 version, the middle row only had two cards (turning it into a pyramid), and each row had $700 tagged to it.

to:

* BonusRound: The Money Cards takes the same premise as the card portion of the main game, but adds an element of gambling. Starting with $200, the player faces three rows of cards, three on the bottom and middle, one on the top. They must wager at least $50 per card until either the final bet, the Big Bet, is played (the player must wager at least half of their total), or the contestant loses all of their money. The Perry run had $200 on each row for a maximum of $28,800, and the player could only change the first card in each row. The Eubanks/Rafferty run doubled the middle row for a maximum of $32,000. Originally, the player could change any card they wanted, later changed to once per row; in either case, three spare cards were provided. In the 2001 version, the middle row only had two cards (turning it into a pyramid), and each row had $700 tagged to it.it; the Big Bet was also renamed the Major Wager for this version. The 2019 revival instead has the Money Cards as a single row of seven cards, with no additional money added. The player bets using the $10,000 they won in the main game, and once they reach the final card, they can either walk away with their winnings or go for the Big Bet.


** TheAnnouncer: Gene Wood, mostly. Johnny Olson (who announced the pilots) filled in at times on the Perry version, as did Jay Stewart (which was his only work for Goodson-Todman); Bob Hilton was the main sub on the Eubanks and Rafferty versions (and also filled in near the end of the Perry version), and Gary Kroeger handled announcing duties on the 2001 version. The ''Game$how Marathon'' edition was voiced by Rich Fields. Donna Jay Fulks announced the ABC revival.

to:

** TheAnnouncer: Gene Wood, mostly. Johnny Olson (who announced the pilots) filled in at times on the Perry version, as did Jay Stewart (which was his only work for Goodson-Todman); Bob Hilton was the main sub on the Eubanks and Rafferty versions (and also filled in near the end of the Perry version), and Gary Kroeger handled announcing duties on the 2001 version. The ''Game$how Marathon'' edition was voiced by Rich Fields. Donna Jay Fulks announced announces the ABC revival.


** TheAnnouncer: Gene Wood, mostly. Johnny Olson (who announced the pilots) filled in at times on the Perry version, as did Jay Stewart (which was his only work for Goodson-Todman); Bob Hilton was the main sub on the Eubanks and Rafferty versions (and also filled in near the end of the Perry version), and Gary Kroeger handled announcing duties on the 2001 version. The ''Game$how Marathon'' edition was voiced by Rich Fields.

to:

** TheAnnouncer: Gene Wood, mostly. Johnny Olson (who announced the pilots) filled in at times on the Perry version, as did Jay Stewart (which was his only work for Goodson-Todman); Bob Hilton was the main sub on the Eubanks and Rafferty versions (and also filled in near the end of the Perry version), and Gary Kroeger handled announcing duties on the 2001 version. The ''Game$how Marathon'' edition was voiced by Rich Fields. Donna Jay Fulks announced the ABC revival.


* MythologyGag: The audience would usually yell "higher" and "freeze" during game play. The audiences on the Bill Cullen edition of ''The Price is Right'' (a Goodson-Todman show) did this as well. The ding used during survey answers and card reveals on the NBC show was the same low "E" used on Cullen's ''Price.''

to:

* MythologyGag: The audience would usually yell "higher" and "freeze" during game play. The audiences 2019 version's Money Cards setup is a single row of seven cards that are each loaded into frames that turn them automatically -- a ''very'' similar setup to the main game's cards on the Bill Cullen edition of ''The Price is Right'' (a Goodson-Todman show) did 2001 revival. Also, chips are used in this as well. The ding used during survey answers and card reveals on version's Money Cards, calling to mind the NBC show was the same low "E" used on Cullen's ''Price.'' "Clip Chips" from said 2001 revival.

Added DiffLines:

** [[spoiler: Aziz from the series premiere of Joel's version changes a card into an eight, and bets low that the card will be lower. It's an ace, but that seems worth losing a low bet after using your ONE change in this version. However, he bets big on the Ace...and gets a Second Ace. He goes all-in on the second ace...and busts out when a THIRD STRAIGHT ACE comes out.]]


** GameShowHost: Jim Perry hosted the original NBC version, followed by Bob Eubanks on CBS and Bill Rafferty on a concurrent syndicated run. Tom Green (no, not the comedian) hosted a very failed 1996 pilot, and Pat Bullard hosted the 2001 version.

to:

** GameShowHost: Jim Perry hosted the original NBC version, followed by Bob Eubanks on CBS and Bill Rafferty on a concurrent syndicated run. Tom Green (no, not the comedian) hosted a very failed 1996 pilot, and Pat Bullard hosted the 2001 version. Joel [=McHale=] hosts the ABC revival.


Popular GameShow from the 1970s and 1980s ([[FanonDiscontinuity just don't talk about the latest version]]), ''Card Sharks'', yet another game from the minds of Creator/MarkGoodson and Bill Todman, was played with two contestants and two decks of cards.

to:

Popular GameShow from the 1970s and 1980s ([[FanonDiscontinuity just don't talk about the latest 2001 version]]), ''Card Sharks'', yet another game from the minds of Creator/MarkGoodson and Bill Todman, was played with two contestants and two decks of cards.

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