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* NeverTrustATrailer: Promos for the ride often exaggerate its horror by showing riders plummeting aboard an elevator that doesn't have seats or restraints. This of course [[CaptainObvious isn't how the actual ride is for obvious reasons]].

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* NeverTrustATrailer: Promos for the ride often exaggerate its horror by showing riders plummeting aboard an elevator that doesn't have seats or restraints. This of course [[CaptainObvious isn't how the actual ride is for obvious reasons]].reasons.


One stormy night long ago, five people stepped through the door of an elevator and into a nightmare. That door is opening once again and this time it's opening for you."'' \\

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One stormy night long ago, five people stepped through the door of an elevator and into a nightmare. That door is opening once again and this time it's opening for you."'' \\"''


One stormy night long ago, five people stepped through the door of an elevator and into a nightmare. That door is opening once again and this time it's opening for you.''

to:

One stormy night long ago, five people stepped through the door of an elevator and into a nightmare. That door is opening once again and this time it's opening for you.''"'' \\



!!The Tower of Tropes:

to:

!!The !!You are about to discover what lies beyond the fifth dimension; beyond the deepest, darkest corner of the imagination...in the Tower of Tropes:


Ever dreaded being in a falling elevator? Well, Imagineers at Walt Disney World developed a thrill ride that simulates that very experience and turn it UpToEleven. That thrill ride: ''The Twilight Zone Tower of Tower''; a popular simulated freefall drop tower at Ride/DisneyThemeParks based on the classic anthology series, ''[[Series/TheTwilightZone1959 The Twilight Zone]]''. Opened in 1994 at Disney's Hollywood Studios (formerly Disney-[[Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer MGM]] Studios until 2008), it was an instant hit among parkgoers and remained a Disney park icon since. ''Twilight Zone'' creator, Creator/RodSerling (voiced by Mark Silverman) hosts the attraction taking you on a bizarre, horrifying tour of the "5th Dimension".

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Ever dreaded being in a falling elevator? Well, Imagineers at Walt Disney World Ride/WaltDisneyWorld developed a thrill ride that simulates that very experience and turn it UpToEleven. That thrill ride: ''The Twilight Zone Tower of Tower''; a popular simulated freefall drop tower at Ride/DisneyThemeParks based on the classic anthology series, ''[[Series/TheTwilightZone1959 The Twilight Zone]]''. Opened in 1994 at Disney's Hollywood Studios (formerly Disney-[[Creator/MetroGoldwynMayer MGM]] Studios until 2008), it was an instant hit among parkgoers and remained a Disney park icon since. ''Twilight Zone'' creator, Creator/RodSerling (voiced by Mark Silverman) hosts the attraction taking you on a bizarre, horrifying tour of the "5th Dimension".


** The Mirror Scene in the Parisian version suggests there's at least one floor of the hotel dedicated to having just a large mirror flanked by two windows on each side, that's it. No rooms, no hallway, literally just a mirror and windows.

to:

** The Mirror Scene in the Parisian version (and the defunct California version) suggests there's at least one floor of the hotel dedicated to having just a large mirror flanked by two windows on each side, that's it. No rooms, no hallway, literally just a mirror and windows.



*** As a cost-cutting measure, the later versions use an "abridged" system that is much shorter in length and less complicated to maintain. There are three shafts, and each shaft is its own separate ride. This was a design decision to make it easier for crews to repair individual areas of the attraction without shutting down the whole ride. Each shaft carries two ride vehicles, operating from one of two load levels, always loading and unloading at the same point. As a result, the boiler room has two floors instead of one. In normal operations, one vehicle in each shaft is doing its trip through the ride while the other is discharging and loading new guests. Thus, instead of the autonomous vehicles of Florida, there's only a single shaft. Because the dark-ride portion takes place in the drop shaft, the physical vertical vehicle conveyance system moves more quickly and nimbly than Florida's (in Florida, the first tower functions only as a dark ride and is not built for the quick movements that the drop portion requires). In place of the Fifth Dimension scene, the later versions have the "Wave goodbye to the real world" scene where you see yourself in a mirror. These later versions also don't have the randomized drop sequence of Florida's version.

to:

*** As a cost-cutting measure, the later versions use an "abridged" system that is much shorter in length and less complicated to maintain. There are three shafts, and each shaft is its own separate ride. This was a design decision to make it easier for crews to repair individual areas of the attraction without shutting down the whole ride. Each shaft carries two ride vehicles, operating from one of two load levels, always loading and unloading at the same point. As a result, the boiler room has two floors instead of one. In normal operations, one vehicle in each shaft is doing its trip through the ride while the other is discharging and loading new guests. Thus, instead of the autonomous vehicles of Florida, there's only a single shaft. Because the dark-ride portion takes place in the drop shaft, the physical vertical vehicle conveyance system moves more quickly and nimbly than Florida's (in Florida, the first tower functions only as a dark ride and is not built for the quick movements that the drop portion requires). In place of the Fifth Dimension scene, the later versions have the "Wave goodbye to the real world" scene where you see yourself in a mirror. These later versions also don't have the randomized drop sequence of Florida's version. In the later versions' hallway scene, there's another elevator at the opposite end of the hallway, whereas Florida has a window there.


In 1939, the Hollywood Tower Hotel was the premier getaway for showbiz A-List. The legend goes that on the stormy [[AllHallowsEve Halloween]] night of that year, five people: a celebrity couple, a little girl with her nanny and a bellman, were all aboard one of the main elevators when the building was struck by lightning, making entire wings of the hotel vanish and their elevator plummet into oblivion. The hotel has been closed and left abandoned since that horrible accident. Decades later, the hotel is now a haunted, broken-down relic of Hollywood's Golden Age looming over Tinseltown at the end of Sunset Boulevard. Recently, however, the hotel has mysteriously reopened inviting you to check-in and stay using the still-operating service elevators. Once onboard, guests experience what happened that horrific night years ago as they traverse past the confines of reality and into their very own special episode of ''The Twilight Zone''.

to:

In 1939, the Hollywood Tower Hotel was the premier getaway for showbiz A-List. The legend goes that on the stormy [[AllHallowsEve Halloween]] night of that year, five people: a celebrity couple, a little girl with her nanny and a bellman, were all aboard one of the main elevators when the building was struck by lightning, making entire wings of the hotel vanish and their elevator plummet into oblivion. The hotel has been closed and left abandoned since that horrible accident. Decades later, the hotel is now a haunted, broken-down relic of Hollywood's Golden Age looming over Tinseltown at the end of Sunset Boulevard. Recently, however, the hotel has mysteriously reopened become active inviting you to check-in and stay using the still-operating service elevators. Once onboard, guests experience what happened that horrific night years ago as they traverse past the confines of reality and into their very own special episode of ''The Twilight Zone''.



* AllThereInTheManual: Tokyo's Tower of Terror had a very extensive online marketing campaign collectively known as TOT1899 that served to tell the attraction's backstory in a variety of different formats ranging from a short film, a manga, a radio drama podcast, and a core website featuring diaries from characters and a short point and click adventure game. However, only the short film and main website received an English translation and most of the material has fallen into obscurity after the campaign ended and the site was closed.

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* AllThereInTheManual: Tokyo's Tower of Terror had a very extensive online marketing campaign collectively known as TOT1899 "[=TOT1899=]" that served to tell the attraction's backstory in a variety of different formats ranging from a short film, a manga, a radio drama podcast, and a core website featuring diaries from characters and a short point and click adventure game. However, only the short film and main website received an English translation and most of the material has fallen into obscurity after the campaign ended and the site was closed.



* TheMovie: ''Tower of Terror'' (1997) with a new movie is supposedly in the works.[[note]]In 2015, it was announced that a new, theatrical movie was said to have a script treatment by ''Film/BigFish'' writer Creator/JohnAugust though it now seems to have lapsed into DevelopmentHell[[/note]]

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* TheMovie: ''Tower of Terror'' (1997) with a new movie is supposedly in the works.[[note]]In 2015, it was announced that a new, theatrical movie was said to have a script treatment by ''Film/BigFish'' writer Creator/JohnAugust though it now seems to have lapsed into DevelopmentHell[[/note]]DevelopmentHell[[/note]][[invoked]]

Added DiffLines:

* RecycledSoundtrack: Tokyo's ''Tower of Terror'' uses music from ''Film/{{Psycho}}'' and ''Film/{{Vertigo}}'' in the outdoor queue area.

Added DiffLines:

* AllThereInTheManual: Tokyo's Tower of Terror had a very extensive online marketing campaign collectively known as TOT1899 that served to tell the attraction's backstory in a variety of different formats ranging from a short film, a manga, a radio drama podcast, and a core website featuring diaries from characters and a short point and click adventure game. However, only the short film and main website received an English translation and most of the material has fallen into obscurity after the campaign ended and the site was closed.


* MythologyGag: The ride is practically overflowing with all kinds of artifacts and references to classic ''Twilight Zone'' episodes. It's essentially a love letter to hardcore fans. To capture and replicate the very feel of the series, the developers supposedly watched '''every. single. episode.''' of the original series...''twice''.
** "Picture If You Will...", a phrase Rod Serling said throughout the series, is posted at the kiosk where guests can buy their on-ride photos.
** The orientation pre-show shown in the libraries opens with the iconic season 4 ''Twilight Zone'' intro. Voice actor Mark Silverman provided the entire impersonation of Serling for the American versions of the ride. Archival footage of Rod Serling from the episode "It's a Good Life" was optically eluded and combined with that of the service elevator. A portion of Serling's narration from that same episode: "Tonight's story of ''The Twilight Zone ''is somewhat unique and calls for a different kind of introduction. This as you may recognize is a..." continues with Silverman's audio "...maintenance service elevator, still in operation, waiting for you.". Originally, in the episode, Serling continues with "...map of the United States".
** Towards the California ride exit, there was a display window for "Willoughby Travel", a nod to the episode "A Stop at Willoughby". Said to be Serling's favorite season 1 episode.
** In the lobby of the Paris version, sits a dusty old doll on the couch. Fans say it's Talky Tina from the episode "Living Doll", but others believe it's Sally Shine, the little girl in the pre-show and ride, and from the ''Tower of Terror'' movie. Others think the doll is simply Shirley Temple (whom Sally Shine is modeled off of). Florida's gift shop has Talky Tina sitting behind the register.
** In all ''Twilight Zone'' versions of the ride, there's a plaque that states the elevator's last inspection. It states it was checked by Mr. Cadwallader, the devious dealer from the episode "Escape Clause", and its number is 10259, referencing the date October 2, 1959, the day the original ''Twilight Zone'' series premiered.
** In the lobby of the California Adventure version, there was a door with the number 22 in brass above; a reference to the episode "Twenty Two".
** In the Florida libraries, there is the book on a desk titled ''To Serve Man'' from the episode of the same name.
** In the Anaheim ride, envelopes with the names Rod Serling and Victoria West were found in the libraries, near the sliding wall referencing the episode "A World of His Own".
** The trumpet from the episode "A Passage for Trumpet" can also be found there, and the Mystic Seer fortune telling machine from "Nick of Time" is on the top shelf.
** The boiler room in Florida displays the ventriloquist dummy "Caesar" from the episode "Caesar and Me".
** The Paris Tower has a display case containing advertisements for items referencing episodes including one for a "Housemaid Wanted" nodding the episode "I Sing the Body Electric" and for "A Pair of Reading Glasses Wanted" from "Time Enough At Last".
** In the photo gallery of the California version, there was a poster advertising "Anthony Fremont's Orchestra". Anthony Fremont is the young boy with god-like powers from the episode "It's a Good Life". The poster also appears in the lobby of the Florida version.
** The thimble from "The After Hours" was previously seen in the California lobby with a card that reads "Looking for a gift for Mother? Find it in our Gift Shop".
** The boiler room in the Paris version both features a reference to the episode "Little Girl Lost". Chalk marks on the walls are done in the same way as the episode when trying to find where the portal to where the girl was. This can be found in the upper level next to the ride's warning signage. The girl's voice can also be heard occasionally calling out for help from the wall and from the radios around the room.
** In the Florida loading area, the flying saucer from the episode "The Invaders" hangs from the ceiling and the eponymous characters of the same episode can be found on display in the library.
** The Anaheim lobby had the toy telephone from the episode "Long Distance Call" with a card saying "Perfect for the children's room and those late night calls from Grandma".
** In a display case at the California Adventure version, there were two objects from the episode "A Thing About Machines"; there's the typewriter with the GET OUT OF HERE FINCHLEY message - the card next to it reads "Almost Writes By Itself" and the electric razor with a card that reads "Has A Long Cord - Can Follow You Everywhere".
** In the Japanese version, one of the pictures of Hightower's exploits is from another place in the park, Lost River Delta.

to:

* MythologyGag: The ride is practically overflowing with all kinds of artifacts and references to classic ''Twilight Zone'' episodes. It's essentially a love letter to hardcore fans. To capture and replicate the very feel of the series, the developers supposedly watched '''every. single. episode.''' of the original series...''twice''.
** "Picture If You Will...", a phrase Rod Serling said throughout the series, is posted at the kiosk where guests can buy their on-ride photos.
** The orientation pre-show shown in the libraries opens with the iconic season 4 ''Twilight Zone'' intro. Voice actor Mark Silverman provided the entire impersonation of Serling for the American versions of the ride. Archival footage of Rod Serling from the episode "It's a Good Life" was optically eluded and combined with that of the service elevator. A portion of Serling's narration from that same episode: "Tonight's story of ''The Twilight Zone ''is somewhat unique and calls for a different kind of introduction. This as you may recognize is a..." continues with Silverman's audio "...maintenance service elevator, still in operation, waiting for you.". Originally, in the episode, Serling continues with "...map of the United States".
** Towards the California ride exit, there was a display window for "Willoughby Travel", a nod to the episode "A Stop at Willoughby". Said to be Serling's favorite season 1 episode.
** In the lobby of the Paris version, sits a dusty old doll on the couch. Fans say it's Talky Tina from the episode "Living Doll", but others believe it's Sally Shine, the little girl in the pre-show and ride, and from the ''Tower of Terror'' movie. Others think the doll is simply Shirley Temple (whom Sally Shine is modeled off of). Florida's gift shop has Talky Tina sitting behind the register.
** In all ''Twilight Zone'' versions of the ride, there's a plaque that states the elevator's last inspection. It states it was checked by Mr. Cadwallader, the devious dealer from the episode "Escape Clause", and
[[MythologyGag/TheTwilightZoneTowerOfTerror Has its number is 10259, referencing the date October 2, 1959, the day the original ''Twilight Zone'' series premiered.
** In the lobby of the California Adventure version, there was a door with the number 22 in brass above; a reference to the episode "Twenty Two".
** In the Florida libraries, there is the book on a desk titled ''To Serve Man'' from the episode of the same name.
** In the Anaheim ride, envelopes with the names Rod Serling and Victoria West were found in the libraries, near the sliding wall referencing the episode "A World of His Own".
** The trumpet from the episode "A Passage for Trumpet" can also be found there, and the Mystic Seer fortune telling machine from "Nick of Time" is on the top shelf.
** The boiler room in Florida displays the ventriloquist dummy "Caesar" from the episode "Caesar and Me".
** The Paris Tower has a display case containing advertisements for items referencing episodes including one for a "Housemaid Wanted" nodding the episode "I Sing the Body Electric" and for "A Pair of Reading Glasses Wanted" from "Time Enough At Last".
** In the photo gallery of the California version, there was a poster advertising "Anthony Fremont's Orchestra". Anthony Fremont is the young boy with god-like powers from the episode "It's a Good Life". The poster also appears in the lobby of the Florida version.
** The thimble from "The After Hours" was previously seen in the California lobby with a card that reads "Looking for a gift for Mother? Find it in our Gift Shop".
** The boiler room in the Paris version both features a reference to the episode "Little Girl Lost". Chalk marks on the walls are done in the same way as the episode when trying to find where the portal to where the girl was. This can be found in the upper level next to the ride's warning signage. The girl's voice can also be heard occasionally calling out for help from the wall and from the radios around the room.
** In the Florida loading area, the flying saucer from the episode "The Invaders" hangs from the ceiling and the eponymous characters of the same episode can be found on display in the library.
** The Anaheim lobby had the toy telephone from the episode "Long Distance Call" with a card saying "Perfect for the children's room and those late night calls from Grandma".
** In a display case at the California Adventure version, there were two objects from the episode "A Thing About Machines"; there's the typewriter with the GET OUT OF HERE FINCHLEY message - the card next to it reads "Almost Writes By Itself" and the electric razor with a card that reads "Has A Long Cord - Can Follow You Everywhere".
** In the Japanese version, one of the pictures of Hightower's exploits is from another place in the park, Lost River Delta.
own page]]


One stormy night long ago, five people stepped through the door of an elevator and into a nightmare. That door is opening once again and this time it's opening for you. \\
You are about to discover what lies beyond the 5th Dimension, beyond the deepest, darkest corner of the imagination--'''in the Tower of Terror'''."''

to:

One stormy night long ago, five people stepped through the door of an elevator and into a nightmare. That door is opening once again and this time it's opening for you. \\\nYou are about to discover what lies beyond the 5th Dimension, beyond the deepest, darkest corner of the imagination--'''in the Tower of Terror'''."''''



* TitleDrop: The Florida attraction has part of its Rod Serling narration actually feature the words "Tower of Terror". See the page quote above.

to:

* TitleDrop: The Florida attraction has part of its Rod Serling narration actually feature the words "Tower of Terror". See ride name, right before the page quote above.drop sequence begins:
-->''"You are about to discover what lies beyond the 5th Dimension, beyond the deepest, darkest corner of the imagination--'''in the Tower of Terror'''."''


* AlienGeometries[=/=]{{Bizarrchitecture}}: Naturally, when your hotel is in "The Twilight Zone" of all places, there's bound to be some irregularities and paradoxes in the layout.
** The neon sign in the Florida attraction is oddly situated in front of and not above the elevator doors on where the top hotel corridors used to be. This was possibly meant to give riders, who would be facing the back of the sign when the elevators doors open, a bit of SurrealHorror.
*** On a side note, the top of the Florida attraction was designed to blend in with the Morocco pavilion at nearby Epcot.
** The orientation pre-show for the Florida attraction shows the elevator that carried the 5 people fell in front of the hotel sign. However, the shaft that contained said elevator is in the lobby located ''beside'' the building.
*** The Paris version has its lobby lift vaguely match with the ones in the pre-show, but the scene just before the first drop has the main elevators doors across the hall directly facing your ride elevator when it should be facing perpendicular as the doors in the lobby do.
** The Mirror Scene in the Parisian ride suggests there's at least one floor of the hotel dedicated to having just a large mirror and two windows on each side, that's it. No rooms, no hallway, literally just a mirror and windows.

to:

* AlienGeometries[=/=]{{Bizarrchitecture}}: Naturally, when your hotel Since the Hollywood Tower Hotel is in "The ''The Twilight Zone" Zone'' of all places, there's bound to be some irregularities and paradoxes in the layout.
layout that just make no sense.
** The giant neon sign in the Florida attraction is oddly situated in ''in front of and not above of'' the elevator doors on doors, where the top hotel corridors used are supposed to be. This was possibly meant to give riders, who would be facing the back of the sign when the elevators doors open, a bit of SurrealHorror.
*** On a side note, the top of the Florida attraction was designed to blend in with the Morocco pavilion at nearby Epcot.
** The orientation pre-show for in the Florida attraction version shows the elevator that carried the 5 people fell in front of the hotel sign. However, the shaft that contained said elevator is in the lobby located ''beside'' the building.
*** ** The Paris version has its lobby lift elevator vaguely match with the ones in the pre-show, but the hallway scene just before the first drop sequence, has the main elevators doors across the hall directly facing your ride elevator when it should be facing perpendicular as the doors in the lobby do.
** The Mirror Scene in the Parisian ride version suggests there's at least one floor of the hotel dedicated to having just a large mirror and flanked by two windows on each side, that's it. No rooms, no hallway, literally just a mirror and windows.



*** The same goes for the mirror in Tokyo [=DisneySea's=] ''Tower of Terror'' as it's somewhat modeled off the Parisian version.

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*** The same goes for the mirror in Tokyo [=DisneySea's=] ''Tower of Terror'' Terror'', as it's somewhat modeled off the Parisian version.version (absent the first two drops, and a shorter final drops).



** You enter the Library on what can be assumed to be "The First Floor", and then make your way to the boiler room. When you approach the elevator, the indicator shows that you are now ''at the basement''. [[note]]In the Florida version, the true basement is the unload area of the attraction.[[/note]]

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** You enter the Library on what can be assumed to be "The First Floor", and then make your way to the boiler room. When you approach the elevator, the indicator shows that you are now ''at the basement''. [[note]]In the Florida version, the true basement is the unload area of the attraction.attraction, and you're on the second floor when you enter the lobby.[[/note]]



*** In Florida, there are two rides within the Tower. On both, you board in one of two shafts inside a smaller tower behind the drop tower. In this shaft, you encounter the hallway scene[[note]]The scene is staggered from shaft to shaft, due to space constraints[[/note]], then you rise again, and you enter the Fifth Dimension scene. Here, the ride vehicles move horizontally out of the dark ride shaft and merge into a single trackless guideway, which takes you through the Fifth Dimension and into the drop shaft. After the randomized drop sequence, you back out of the drop shaft into an unload area at actual ground level, and the cab rotates 90 degrees so you can unload. Then the empty cab goes back to the dark ride shaft it originated in, and goes back to the load area. There are four ride vehicles working each side of the building, for a total of eight at any given time.
*** In the later versions of the ride, there are three shafts, and each shaft is its own separate ride. This was a design decision to make it easier for crews to repair individual areas of the attraction without shutting down the whole ride. Each shaft carries two ride vehicles, operating from one of two load levels, always loading and unloading at the same point. As a result, the boiler room has two floors instead of one. In normal operations, one vehicle in each shaft is doing its trip through the ride while the other is discharging and loading new guests. Thus, instead of the autonomous vehicles of Florida, there's only a single shaft. Because the dark-ride portion takes place in the drop shaft, the physical vertical vehicle conveyance system moves more quickly and nimbly than Florida's (in Florida, the first tower functions only as a dark ride and is not built for the quick movements that the drop portion requires). In place of the Fifth Dimension scene, the later versions have the "Wave goodbye to the real world" scene where you see yourself in a mirror. These later versions also don't have the randomized drop sequence of Florida's version.

to:

*** In Florida, there are two rides ride systems within the Tower. On both, you board in one of two shafts inside a smaller tower behind the drop tower. In this shaft, you encounter the hallway scene[[note]]The scene is staggered from shaft to shaft, due to space constraints[[/note]], then you rise again, and you enter the Fifth Dimension scene. Here, the ride vehicles move horizontally out of the dark ride shaft and merge into a single trackless guideway, guideway,[[note]]The ride elevator is guided by computers to follow a magnetic strip embedded in the floor[[/note]] which takes you through the Fifth Dimension and into the drop shaft. After the randomized drop sequence, you back out of the drop shaft into an unload area at actual ground level, and the cab rotates 90 degrees so you can unload. Then the empty cab goes back to the dark ride shaft it originated in, and goes back to the load area. There are four ride vehicles working each side of the building, for a total of eight at any given time.
*** In As a cost-cutting measure, the later versions of the ride, there use an "abridged" system that is much shorter in length and less complicated to maintain. There are three shafts, and each shaft is its own separate ride. This was a design decision to make it easier for crews to repair individual areas of the attraction without shutting down the whole ride. Each shaft carries two ride vehicles, operating from one of two load levels, always loading and unloading at the same point. As a result, the boiler room has two floors instead of one. In normal operations, one vehicle in each shaft is doing its trip through the ride while the other is discharging and loading new guests. Thus, instead of the autonomous vehicles of Florida, there's only a single shaft. Because the dark-ride portion takes place in the drop shaft, the physical vertical vehicle conveyance system moves more quickly and nimbly than Florida's (in Florida, the first tower functions only as a dark ride and is not built for the quick movements that the drop portion requires). In place of the Fifth Dimension scene, the later versions have the "Wave goodbye to the real world" scene where you see yourself in a mirror. These later versions also don't have the randomized drop sequence of Florida's version.


* '''Disney's Hollywood Studios (Walt Disney World, FL, US)''' and '''Walt Disney Studios Park (Paris, France)''' are the ''Twilight Zone'' versions of the ride. The original at WDW (pictured) is the most relatively popular iteration featuring the "5th Dimension Scene" where your elevator travels ''horizontally'' across to one of the drop shafts on the other side. A streamlined version of the original made to save money and space opened at '''Disney California Adventure (Disneyland, CA, US)''' in 2004 and Paris in 2007, with an [[ArtDeco Pueblo Deco]] exterior unlike Florida's pseudo-gothic architecture. Disneyland's Tower was later re-themed into ''[[Ride/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyMissionBreakout Guardians of the Galaxy - Mission: BREAKOUT]]'' in 2017.[[note]]The attraction followed the release of ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyVol2''[[/note]]
* Opened in 2006, the '''Tokyo [=DisneySea=] (Urayasu, Japan)''' version has a completely different storyline devoid of any ''Twilight Zone'' references and is just titled ''Tower of Terror''. Set at Hotel Hightower in New York, guests learn of the disastrous accident that befell the hotel on New Year's Eve, 1899. The hotel's owner, Harrison Hightower III, had stolen a sacred African idol which in turn killed him aboard one of the elevators, forever cursing the hotel along with any who enter.

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* '''Disney's Hollywood Studios (Walt Disney World, FL, US)''' and '''Walt Disney Studios Park (Paris, France)''' are the ''Twilight Zone'' versions of the ride. The original at WDW (pictured) is the most relatively popular iteration featuring the "5th Dimension Scene" where your elevator travels ''horizontally'' across to one of the drop shafts on the other side. A streamlined version of the original made to save money and space opened at '''Disney California Adventure (Disneyland, CA, US)''' in 2004 and Paris in 2007, with an a [[ArtDeco Pueblo Deco]] exterior unlike Florida's pseudo-gothic architecture. Disneyland's Tower was later re-themed into ''[[Ride/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyMissionBreakout Guardians of the Galaxy - Mission: BREAKOUT]]'' in 2017.[[note]]The attraction followed the release of ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyVol2''[[/note]]
* Opened in 2006, the '''Tokyo [=DisneySea=] (Urayasu, Japan)''' version has a an entirely new storyline completely different storyline devoid of any ''Twilight Zone'' references and is just titled ''Tower of Terror''. Set at Hotel Hightower in New York, guests learn of the disastrous accident that befell the hotel on New Year's Eve, 1899. The hotel's owner, Harrison Hightower III, had stolen a sacred African idol which in turn killed him aboard one of the elevators, forever cursing the hotel along with any who enter.



* ThirteenIsUnlucky: All over the place, see MissingFloor.
** The clock in the lobby has stopped at the time 8:05. The official backstory says that the lightning struck the hotel at this time. Eight plus five equals thirteen.



* ThirteenIsUnlucky: All over the place, see MissingFloor.
** The clock in the lobby has stopped at the time 8:05. The official backstory says that the lightning struck the hotel at this time. Eight plus five equals thirteen.


* '''Disney's Hollywood Studios (Walt Disney World, FL, US)''' and '''Walt Disney Studios Park (Paris, France)''' are the ''Twilight Zone'' versions of the ride. The original at WDW (pictured) is the most relatively popular iteration featuring the "5th Dimension Scene" where your elevator travels ''horizontally'' across to one of the drop shafts on the other side. A streamlined version of the original made to save money and space opened at '''Disney California Adventure (Disneyland, CA, US)''' in 2004 and Paris in 2007, with an ArtDeco[[note]]Actually Pueblo Deco to be precise[[/note]] exterior unlike Florida's pseudo-gothic architecture. Disneyland's Tower was later re-themed into ''[[Ride/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyMissionBreakout Guardians of the Galaxy - Mission: BREAKOUT]]'' in 2017.[[note]]The attraction followed the release of ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyVol2''[[/note]]

to:

* '''Disney's Hollywood Studios (Walt Disney World, FL, US)''' and '''Walt Disney Studios Park (Paris, France)''' are the ''Twilight Zone'' versions of the ride. The original at WDW (pictured) is the most relatively popular iteration featuring the "5th Dimension Scene" where your elevator travels ''horizontally'' across to one of the drop shafts on the other side. A streamlined version of the original made to save money and space opened at '''Disney California Adventure (Disneyland, CA, US)''' in 2004 and Paris in 2007, with an ArtDeco[[note]]Actually [[ArtDeco Pueblo Deco to be precise[[/note]] Deco]] exterior unlike Florida's pseudo-gothic architecture. Disneyland's Tower was later re-themed into ''[[Ride/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyMissionBreakout Guardians of the Galaxy - Mission: BREAKOUT]]'' in 2017.[[note]]The attraction followed the release of ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxyVol2''[[/note]]


** Florida's design is different from later versions. Florida's Hollywood Tower Hotel uses a Neo-Mediterranean design that was popular in the 1920s (around the time the hotel was supposedly built). This was also partially necessary due to Hollywood Studios' proximity to Epcot, as someone standing in the Mexico pavilion looking straight across the Seven Seas Lagoon towards the Morocco pavilion can see the backside of the Tower of Terror poking up in the distance behind Morocco, with the architecture blending seamlessly enough that you wouldn't know you were looking at the Tower of Terror unless you had a sharp eye. The hotel in later versions of the ride was designed with a ''Pueblo deco'' style that was popular in Los Angeles in the late 1920s.

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** Florida's design is different from later versions. Florida's Hollywood Tower Hotel uses a Neo-Mediterranean design that was popular in the 1920s (around the time the hotel was supposedly built). This was also partially necessary due to Hollywood Studios' proximity to Epcot, as someone standing in the Mexico pavilion looking straight across the Seven Seas World Showcase Lagoon towards the Morocco pavilion can see the backside of the Tower of Terror poking up in the distance behind Morocco, with the architecture blending seamlessly enough that you wouldn't know you were looking at the Tower of Terror unless you had a sharp eye. The hotel in later versions of the ride was designed with a ''Pueblo deco'' style that was popular in Los Angeles in the late 1920s.



* LongRunner: The original attraction in Florida has been in operation since 1994 while the other incarnations opened between 2004 and 2007. Sadly subverted with the California version which only lasted 13 years.

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* LongRunner: The original attraction in Florida has been in operation since 1994 while the other incarnations opened between 2004 and 2007. Sadly subverted Subverted with the California version which only lasted 13 years.years before being converted into ''Guardians of the Galaxy: Mission Breakout''.


* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Florida uses a different ride infrastructure from the later versions of the ride, in which the elevator cabs start the ride in one shaft, then travel horizontally through the Fifth Dimension scene and into the drop shaft. The elevator cabs are self-propelled automated ride vehicles which lock into separate vertical motion cabs. The cabs can move into and out of elevators horizontally, move through the "Fifth Dimension" scene, and on to the drop shaft. Then one backs out of the drop shaft and turns 90 degrees to unload, then the empty cab returns to the loading area. In the later versions, the entire ride happens within the drop shaft. The boiler room on the later versions is also two levels instead of one due to the differently configured system.
Ride experience

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Florida uses EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
**Florida has
a much different ride infrastructure from the later versions of the ride, in which ride.
***In Florida, there are two rides within
the elevator cabs start Tower. On both, you board in one of two shafts inside a smaller tower behind the drop tower. In this shaft, you encounter the hallway scene[[note]]The scene is staggered from shaft to shaft, due to space constraints[[/note]], then you rise again, and you enter the Fifth Dimension scene. Here, the ride in one shaft, then travel vehicles move horizontally out of the dark ride shaft and merge into a single trackless guideway, which takes you through the Fifth Dimension scene and into the drop shaft. The elevator cabs are self-propelled automated ride vehicles which lock into separate vertical motion cabs. The cabs can move into and out of elevators horizontally, move through After the "Fifth Dimension" scene, and on to the randomized drop shaft. Then one backs sequence, you back out of the drop shaft into an unload area at actual ground level, and turns the cab rotates 90 degrees to unload, then so you can unload. Then the empty cab returns goes back to the loading dark ride shaft it originated in, and goes back to the load area. In the later versions, the entire There are four ride happens within vehicles working each side of the drop shaft. The boiler room on building, for a total of eight at any given time.
***In
the later versions of the ride, there are three shafts, and each shaft is also its own separate ride. This was a design decision to make it easier for crews to repair individual areas of the attraction without shutting down the whole ride. Each shaft carries two levels ride vehicles, operating from one of two load levels, always loading and unloading at the same point. As a result, the boiler room has two floors instead of one. In normal operations, one vehicle in each shaft is doing its trip through the ride while the other is discharging and loading new guests. Thus, instead of the autonomous vehicles of Florida, there's only a single shaft. Because the dark-ride portion takes place in the drop shaft, the physical vertical vehicle conveyance system moves more quickly and nimbly than Florida's (in Florida, the first tower functions only as a dark ride and is not built for the quick movements that the drop portion requires). In place of the Fifth Dimension scene, the later versions have the "Wave goodbye to the real world" scene where you see yourself in a mirror. These later versions also don't have the randomized drop sequence of Florida's version.
**Florida's design is different from later versions. Florida's Hollywood Tower Hotel uses a Neo-Mediterranean design that was popular in the 1920s (around the time the hotel was supposedly built). This was also partially necessary
due to Hollywood Studios' proximity to Epcot, as someone standing in the differently configured system.
Ride experience
Mexico pavilion looking straight across the Seven Seas Lagoon towards the Morocco pavilion can see the backside of the Tower of Terror poking up in the distance behind Morocco, with the architecture blending seamlessly enough that you wouldn't know you were looking at the Tower of Terror unless you had a sharp eye. The hotel in later versions of the ride was designed with a ''Pueblo deco'' style that was popular in Los Angeles in the late 1920s.
**Florida's version only had one big drop in the drop shaft for the first two years. In May 1996, this was increased to two drops. Rumbling effects and faster acceleration were implemented in 1999. And in January 2003, the current randomized drop sequence pattern was implemented, wherein riders get five to eight drops of varying length depending on which pattern is chosen by the ride computers. Regardless of the number of randomized drops and lifts, each drop sequence always features one "faux drop" meant to startle the riders, and one complete drop through the entire tower at the top speed of 39 miles per hour (63 km/h).



** The orientation pre-show shown in the libraries opens with the iconic season 4 ''Twilight Zone'' intro. Voice actor Mark Silverman provided the entire impersonation of Serling for the American versions of the ride. Archival footage of Rod Serling from the episode "It's a Good Life" was optically eluded and combined with that of the service elevator. A portion of Serling's narration from that same episode: "Tonight's story on The Twilight Zone is somewhat unique and calls for a different kind of introduction. This as you may recognize is a..." continues with Silverman's audio "...maintenance service elevator, still in operation, waiting for you.". Originally, in the episode, Serling continues with "...map of the United States".

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** The orientation pre-show shown in the libraries opens with the iconic season 4 ''Twilight Zone'' intro. Voice actor Mark Silverman provided the entire impersonation of Serling for the American versions of the ride. Archival footage of Rod Serling from the episode "It's a Good Life" was optically eluded and combined with that of the service elevator. A portion of Serling's narration from that same episode: "Tonight's story on The of ''The Twilight Zone is ''is somewhat unique and calls for a different kind of introduction. This as you may recognize is a..." continues with Silverman's audio "...maintenance service elevator, still in operation, waiting for you.". Originally, in the episode, Serling continues with "...map of the United States".



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