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* SmartBall: Homer manages to run circles around Rex Banner via a genuinely clever bowling ball scheme and never actually gets caught. Lampshaded by Marge.


** Prohibiting alcohol didn't make people stop wanting to drink alcohol. Homer himself scoffs at the proposal ("They tried that in the movies, and it didn't work"), so he's also RightForTheWrongReasons about it.

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** Prohibiting alcohol didn't make people stop wanting to drink alcohol.it. Homer himself scoffs at the proposal ("They tried that in the movies, and it didn't work"), so he's also RightForTheWrongReasons about it.


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* ReviveTheAncientCustom: Springfield brings back a 200-year-old law banning alcohol in Springfield in response to Bart accidentally getting drunk at the St. Patrick's Day parade.

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* StPatricksDayEpisode: The episode opens on St. Patrick's Day, with Bart accidentally getting drunk during the parade kicking off the main plot.


* UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom: Most of the episode's plot happens because a clerk unveils an old Prohibition law and never bothered to read the whole parchment and learn the law was no longer in effect. It would be a miracle if he managed to retain his job after making such a horrible blunder. Of course, this is Springfield we're talking about.

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* UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom: UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom:
**
Most of the episode's plot happens because a clerk unveils an old Prohibition law and never bothered to read the whole parchment and learn the law was no longer in effect. It would be a miracle if he managed to retain his job after making such a horrible blunder. Of course, this is Springfield we're talking about.about.
** The prohibition itself would almost certainly not have occurred, had the Duff float aimed its beer hose anywhere other than the horn that Bart was using as a mouthpiece.


"Homer vs. the Eighteenth Amendment" is the eighteenth episode of the eight season of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' (production code 4F15), first aired on March 16, 1997. This episode deals with the banning of alcohol of Springfield after Bart gets drunk at the St. Patrick's Day parade, with Homer running a bootleg business while a no-nonsense Elliot Ness-style lawman tries to enforce the law.

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Episode: 4F15\\
First Aired: 3/16/1997

"Homer vs. the Eighteenth Amendment" is the eighteenth episode of the eight season of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' (production code 4F15), first aired on March 16, 1997. This episode deals with the banning of alcohol of Springfield after ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''. After Bart gets drunk becomes intoxicated at the annual St. Patrick's Day parade, with Springfield enforces a [[TheRoaringTwenties Prohibition-era law]]. As a result, Homer running and his friends open a bootleg business speakeasy while a no-nonsense [[Series/TheUntouchables Elliot Ness-style Ness]]-style lawman tries sets out to enforce the law.
stop them.



It's St. Patrick's Day and everybody in Springfield is hyped up to the point Bart is teased for having forgotten to wear green to school and Moe bars designated drivers from patronizing his tavern. The day's main event is of course the St. Pat parade downtown, with floats celebrating "200 years of Irish policemen", the "drunken poets of Ireland" (who fight whoever they find) and a "small Irish family" (a woman scolds her drunken husband while their ten or so children run around). Meanwhile, drunken revelers harass Kent Brockman in his broadcasting booth and the crowd cheers when a British "chip shop" suddenly blows up.

Trying to get a better view, Bart decides to make his way through the crowd unaware that a Duff truck about is to spray beer on the expectant revelers and the whole thing ends up on Bart's long horn, inebriating him instantly. He is soon caught tipsily strolling along the parade, leading to a town-wide outrage, with Brockman suggesting Prohibition as a measure. Homer scoffs at the idea, but the town's MoralGuardians, led by Helen Lovejoy and Maude Flanders press Mayor Quimby to declare Springfield dry. While he disparages them as a bunch of "old ladies", he relents after being reminded about an imminent mayoral campaign. The man at the registry then finds out two 200-year-old laws: one about ducks having to wear long breeches, and another declaring alcohol prohibition in Springfield, which was apparently still in force. The news lead the town's boozehounds to pass out.

to:

It's St. Patrick's Day and everybody in Springfield is hyped up to the point Bart is teased harassed for having forgotten to wear green to school and Moe bars designated drivers from patronizing his tavern. The day's main event is of course the St. Pat parade downtown, downtown parade, with floats celebrating "200 years of Irish policemen", the "drunken poets of Ireland" (who fight whoever they find) and a "small Irish family" (a woman scolds her drunken husband while their ten or so children run around). Meanwhile, drunken revelers harass Kent Brockman in his broadcasting booth and the crowd cheers when a British "chip shop" suddenly blows up.

Trying to get a better view, Bart decides to make his way through the crowd unaware that a Duff truck about is to spray beer on the expectant revelers and the whole thing ends up on Bart's long horn, inebriating him instantly. He is soon caught tipsily strolling along the parade, leading to a town-wide outrage, with Brockman suggesting Prohibition as a measure. Homer scoffs at the idea, but the town's MoralGuardians, led by Helen Lovejoy and Maude Flanders Flanders, press Mayor Quimby to declare Springfield dry. While he disparages them as a bunch of "old ladies", he relents after being reminded about an imminent mayoral campaign. The man at the registry then finds out uncovers two 200-year-old laws: one about ducks having to wear long breeches, and another declaring alcohol prohibition in Springfield, which was apparently still in force. The news lead the town's boozehounds to pass out.






--->'''Marge:''' What happened to you, Homer? And what have you done to the car?
--->'''Homer:''' Nothin'.
--->'''Marge:''' I don't think it had broken axles before.
--->'''Homer:''' Before! Before! You're livin' in the past, Marge. Quit livin' in the past.

to:

--->'''Marge:''' What happened to you, Homer? And what have you done to the car?
--->'''Homer:''' Nothin'.
--->'''Marge:'''
car?\\
'''Homer:''' Nothin'.\\
'''Marge:'''
I don't think it had broken axles before.
--->'''Homer:'''
before.\\
'''Homer:'''
Before! Before! You're livin' in the past, Marge. Quit livin' in the past.


** Banner has a much more ridiculous version of that mentality, outright saying [[WhatYouAreInTheDark he'd be going on a killing spree if the law allowed it]].


Episode - 4F15\\
First Aired - 3/16/1997

Alcohol is banned from Springfield after Bart accidentally gets drunk at the St. Patrick's Day parade and the local law clerk discovers that there's apparently been a Prohibition-law for the last two centuries, but was never enforced. To combat this, Homer becomes a bootlegger -- and the town fights back with a no-nonsense, Elliot Ness-style lawman who puts the incompetent Chief Wiggum out of a job.

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Episode - 4F15\\
First Aired - 3/16/1997

Alcohol
"Homer vs. the Eighteenth Amendment" is banned from the eighteenth episode of the eight season of ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' (production code 4F15), first aired on March 16, 1997. This episode deals with the banning of alcohol of Springfield after Bart accidentally gets drunk at the St. Patrick's Day parade and the local law clerk discovers that there's apparently been a Prohibition-law for the last two centuries, but was never enforced. To combat this, parade, with Homer becomes running a bootlegger -- and the town fights back with bootleg business while a no-nonsense, no-nonsense Elliot Ness-style lawman who puts tries to enforce the incompetent Chief Wiggum out of a job.
law.


[[caption-width-right:350: [[AlcoholInducedIdiocy To alcohol! The cause of ... and solution to ... all of life's problems.]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:350: [[AlcoholInducedIdiocy To alcohol! The cause of ... of... and solution to ...to... all of life's problems.]]]]



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!!This episode contains examples of:

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!!This episode
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!!Plot Summary
It's St. Patrick's Day and everybody in Springfield is hyped up to the point Bart is teased for having forgotten to wear green to school and Moe bars designated drivers from patronizing his tavern. The day's main event is of course the St. Pat parade downtown, with floats celebrating "200 years of Irish policemen", the "drunken poets of Ireland" (who fight whoever they find) and a "small Irish family" (a woman scolds her drunken husband while their ten or so children run around). Meanwhile, drunken revelers harass Kent Brockman in his broadcasting booth and the crowd cheers when a British "chip shop" suddenly blows up.

Trying to get a better view, Bart decides to make his way through the crowd unaware that a Duff truck about is to spray beer on the expectant revelers and the whole thing ends up on Bart's long horn, inebriating him instantly. He is soon caught tipsily strolling along the parade, leading to a town-wide outrage, with Brockman suggesting Prohibition as a measure. Homer scoffs at the idea, but the town's MoralGuardians, led by Helen Lovejoy and Maude Flanders press Mayor Quimby to declare Springfield dry. While he disparages them as a bunch of "old ladies", he relents after being reminded about an imminent mayoral campaign. The man at the registry then finds out two 200-year-old laws: one about ducks having to wear long breeches, and another declaring alcohol prohibition in Springfield, which was apparently still in force. The news lead the town's boozehounds to pass out.

H.K. Duff VII, of Duff breweries, tries to comfort the public by announcing a non-alcoholic version of the popular beer, but goes out of business only a half-hour later. Meanwhile, Moe's is still operating as if nothing, also earning new clientele and the Mafia smuggles beer into town unpunished. At night, Mrs. Lovejoy's entourage finds Chief Wiggum drunkenly dancing at the tavern and then forces Quimby to look for federal assistance, with Treasury agent Rex Banner being selected to enforce prohibition, cleaning up the SPD and firing Wiggum on the spot.

As all accesses to Springfield are blocked out, Homer sees an opportunity to become a bootlegger by retrieving the town's buried beer supply, which he hides on bowling balls which he sends to Moe's via the Bowl-A-Rama. Marge soon finds out what Homer and Bart have been up to and... is actually supporting of their deeds, much to Lisa's chagrin, being sent to bed when complaining about breaching a law that might be unpopular, but it's still the law. Rumors arise about a "Beer Baron" baffling Banner, who vows to get him to justice and deems the very idea of a bootlegger operating under his jurisdiction to be laughable.

As the beer supply runs out, Homer resorts to homebrewing liquor for Moe's Tav... er, Pet Shop. But this endeavor proves short-lived as the stills keep exploding. While Banner keeps on searching for the Baron, Homer finds a hungry Wiggum trying to hold him up... but his gun has no cannon as he had to sell it to feed his family. Noticing his desperate situation, Homer offers to turn himself in so Wiggum could get his old job back... unaware that the punishment for violating the law of prohibition is being catapulted. When Marge protests such a form of punishment, Banner goes into a rant about why laws must be upheld, including the fact he'd kill everybody if it were not for the law. He then ends up flung by the catapult by "accident"... on Wiggum's orders. And just before Homer's execution takes place, the registry clerk finds out the 200-year-old prohibition law had actually been repealed for 199 years. Homer is then exonerated and vows to bring back booze at once, proclaiming it to be both the cause of and solution to all of life's problems.
----
!!"Homer vs. the Eighteenth Amendment"
contains examples of:



* BehindTheBlack: After returning from a Beer Baron run, Homer briefly considers checking to see if the coast is clear before taking his wheelbarrow inside ... and running into Marge, who's standing right in front of him.

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* BehindTheBlack: After returning from a Beer Baron run, Homer briefly considers checking to see if the coast is clear before taking his wheelbarrow inside ...inside... and running into Marge, who's standing right in front of him.

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* EveryoneHasStandards: Springfield wholly embraces getting drunk off their ass on St. Patrick's Day, with Apu even telling everyone to get naked. But as soon as attention is drawn to Bart being drunk, every single adult acts horrified.


* AccidentalPervert: When the anti-alcohol women's group catch Chief Wiggum dancing with Princess Kashmir, Wiggum decides to "give them the old Wiggum charm." Just as he struts up to the group, smiling, Helen Lovejoy screams, "PERVERT!" thinking that he was going to molest her.

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* AccidentalPervert: When the anti-alcohol women's group catch a drunk Chief Wiggum dancing with Princess Kashmir, Kashmir in Moe's tavern, Wiggum decides attempts to save face and "give them the old Wiggum charm." Just as he struts up to the group, smiling, Helen Lovejoy screams, "PERVERT!" thinking that he was going to molest her.her.
-->'''Wiggum:''' Oh boy. That sounded bad.



-->'''Homer:''' No you won't!

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-->'''Homer:''' ''*shouts offscreen*'' No you won't!


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* OffModel: When the anti-alcohol group catch Moe's bar, we cut to a ''very'' bizarrely animated shot of Wiggum and Princess Kashmir dancing. Even the creative team themselves were baffled by this scene when they rewatched it in the DVD commentary.

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* EpicFail: Duff Brewery's attempt to sell non-alcoholic beer in Springfield just can't be classified with any other term: the company shuts down ''half an hour'' after the press conference.


* OutsideGenreFoe: Rex Banner, who is sent to Springfield to enforce the dry law. PlayedForLaughs as he's an animated copycat of Elliot Ness and someone who definitely would have done a better job at keeping law and order during the time of the Hays Code (where he would have been handed victory just because he's a lawman) than on the modern (and incompetent) Wretched Hive that is Springfield.

to:

* OutsideGenreFoe: Rex Banner, who is sent to Springfield to enforce the dry law. PlayedForLaughs as he's an animated copycat of Elliot Ness and someone who definitely would have done a better job at keeping law and order during the time of the Hays Code (where he would have been handed victory just because he's a lawman) than on the modern (and incompetent) Wretched Hive WretchedHive that is Springfield.



* PoliceBrutality:
** The Irish cop float was surrounded by Irish policemen who clubbed parade viewers while saying MoveAlongNothingToSeeHere.

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* PoliceBrutality:
**
PoliceBrutality: The Irish cop float was surrounded by Irish policemen who clubbed parade viewers while saying MoveAlongNothingToSeeHere.



* RecycledAnimation: he riot at the beginning of the episode was taken from footage from the end of "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS6E8LisaOnIce Lisa on Ice]]" and updated.

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* RecycledAnimation: he The riot at the beginning of the episode was taken from footage from the end of "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS6E8LisaOnIce Lisa on Ice]]" and updated.


* StrawmanHasAPoint: As discussed, Lisa feels that the prohibition law should be followed even though it is unpopular which [[GoToYourRoom gets her sent to her room]]. But one needs to keep in mind that she is eight years old and very vulnerable to what would happen if her father and brother get caught by Banner: they could be catapulted to their deaths or at best, injured to a severe physical impairment that could have an effect on Homer's job at the Nuclear Power Plant (he is also the main breadwinner), the trauma of seeing your father and brother catapulted, and the family going into dire straits financially as a result of Homer having a crime record or his disability/death. She probably didn't feel all that possible trauma or misfortune was worth getting beer into Springfield.

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* StrawmanHasAPoint: As discussed, Lisa feels that the prohibition law should be followed even though it is unpopular which [[GoToYourRoom gets her sent to her room]]. But one needs to keep in mind that she is eight years old and very vulnerable to what would happen if her father and brother get caught by Banner: they could be catapulted to their deaths or at best, injured to a severe physical impairment that could have an effect on Homer's job at the Nuclear Power Plant (he is also the main breadwinner), the trauma of seeing your father and brother catapulted, and the family going into dire straits financially as a result of Homer having a crime record or his disability/death. She probably didn't feel all that possible trauma or misfortune was worth getting beer into Springfield.


* AssholeVictim: Rex Banner gets launched by the catapult after testing it by launching a cat and saying that the only thing stopping him from becoming a spree killer is the fact that the law forbids him. The only reaction everybody has to him being flung by the catapult (under Wiggum's orders) is Quimby saying a puzzled "well, ''that'' happened."

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* AssholeVictim: Rex Banner gets launched by the catapult after testing it by launching a cat and saying that the only thing stopping him from becoming a spree killer is the fact that the law forbids him. The only reaction everybody has to him being flung by the catapult (under Wiggum's orders) is Quimby saying a puzzled "well, "Well, ''that'' happened."was unexpected."
* BadPeopleAbuseAnimals: Already a RabidCop who casually admits he'd kill anyone who looked at him funny, Rex Banner has no qualms about testing the catapult with an actual cat. The poor creature ends up launched into the horizon.

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