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History Recap / DoctorWhoS17E6Shada

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* HotterAndSexier: For some reason, the animated version's Claire is a lot less conservatively and more punkishly costumed than the live-action version, with a pink fluffy [[SweaterGirl sweater]] showing quite a bit of cleavage, a goth-influenced make-up job, and a ''studded leather dog collar''. The animated Chronotis is also [[GrandpaWhatMassiveHotnessYouHave rather more well-preserved]] than the live-action one.

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* HotterAndSexier: For some reason, the animated version's Claire is a lot less conservatively and more punkishly costumed than the live-action version, with a pink fluffy [[SweaterGirl sweater]] showing quite a bit of cleavage, a goth-influenced make-up job, and a ''studded leather dog collar''. The animated Chronotis is also [[GrandpaWhatMassiveHotnessYouHave [[SilverFox rather more well-preserved]] than the live-action one.


* LuckBasedSearchTechnique: Clare is searching Prof. Chronotis' study and discovers the controls to his TARDIS by leaning on a bookshelf.



* ShaggySearchTechnique: Clare is searching Prof. Chronotis' study and discovers the controls to his TARDIS by leaning on a bookshelf.


* {{Oxbridge}}: Fictional Cedd's College in actual Cambridge.

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* InstantExpert: Chronotis downloads all his knowledge of TARDIS engineering into Clare's head to get an extra set of skilled hands to help repair his ancient time machine, providing the first clue that he's really Salyavin. No mention is ever made of him taking that knowledge back out, which invites the question of what she'll do with that knowledge when the adventure is over.
* ItWasHereISwear: Inverted. A Cambridge staffer reports to the police that Professor Chronotis' quarters have disappeared (because Chronotis' quarters were a TARDIS that had just vworped off after Skagra). By the time the police send someone to look into the report, Chronotis and his quarters have returned.


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* MeaningfulEcho: In the novelization, ''everyone'' keeps thinking of and referring to Chronotis as a "nice old man". It's implied that he'd been using his mind control powers to get people to think of him like this as part of his cover.


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* ScatterbrainedSenior: Chronotis. It's part of the reason he wanted to turn the book over to the Doctor, why he lost the book to Parsons, and why he had a hard time remembering who took it. After his death and accidental resurrection, his mind is much sharper.


* TheAlcatraz: Shada. Since the only way to get to it is by using the Book, breakouts from the outside are virtually impossible, and since all prisoners are put into stasis the moment they enter their cells, breakouts from the inside are also impossible. The only person to ever escape was Salyavin, who did it by avoiding getting locked into a stasis cell in the first place.

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* TheAlcatraz: TheAlcatraz:
**
Shada. Since the only way to get to it is by using the Book, breakouts from the outside are virtually impossible, and since all prisoners are put into stasis the moment they enter their cells, breakouts from the inside are also impossible. The only person to ever escape was Salyavin, who did it by avoiding getting locked into a stasis cell in the first place.place.
** Skagra's brig is a smaller example. It's a small room with no exits. The only way in or out is by teleporter. In the end, Skagra ends up locked up in it himself.



* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: In the novelization, Salyavin wasn't really a criminal. The Time Lords were so afraid of what he ''might'' do with his powers that they locked him up (or at least, tried to lock him up) preemptively and then spread propaganda about how dangerous he was to retroactively justify their actions. In time, people assumed that the fictional stories made up by the government were the truth.

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* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: In the novelization, Salyavin wasn't really a criminal. The Time Lords were so afraid of what he ''might'' do with his powers that they locked him up (or at least, tried to lock him up) preemptively and then spread propaganda about how dangerous he was to retroactively justify their actions. In time, people assumed that the fictional stories made up by the government were the truth. The 2017 version just has claims that the severity of Salyavin's crimes were exaggerated, but since the primary source of that explanation in both cases was Salyavin himself, and since the story of Salyavin was old when the Doctor was young, it's hard to determine how accurate it was.


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* MesACrowd: How the Doctor defeats Skagra. Because he had been mind drained earlier, there was a copy of the Doctor's mind in the hive mind that Skagra had created. The Doctor then used his cobbled-together helmet to link with the other copy of his mind to convince the hive mind to turn against Skagra.


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* NoodleIncident: Salyavin allegedly used his mind control powers to commit terrible crimes, which was why he was locked up. But no adaptation ever explicitly states what those crimes actually ''were''. The novelization uses this to claim that this was because they never actually happened - the Council was so afraid of what he ''might'' do that they locked him up pre-emptively and then invented tales of him being a criminal to justify their actions.


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* ProtagonistCenteredMorality: In the end, the Doctor and Romana allow Salyavin, who they know and like, to go back to his retirement into obscurity at Cambridge instead of taking him to the cell he was supposed to be locked up in in Shada. But all the other prisoners that Skagra let out of their cells, who they have never spoken to, are locked back up the moment the Doctor finished restoring their minds, saying it's not up to them to argue with Gallifrey's courts.


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* UnusuallyUninterestingSight: Nobody in Cambridge pays any attention to Skagra's caped disco suit, or to the Doctor fleeing a flying metal sphere on a bicycle.
* WackyFratboyHijinks: At the end of the story, a policeman comes by to investigate the report of Professor Chronitis' quarters disappearing, only to find that they had suddenly reappeared. He goes on to assume that this was some sort of student prank, like snatching policemen's helmets. Then he notices the police call box sitting in the corner of the Professor's living room and comes to the conclusion that this particular set of schoolboy shenanigans had taken it up a notch. After watching the call box suddenly vanish into thin air, the constable decides to take Chronotis, Clare and Chris to the station for questioning.


[[caption-width-right:350:''[[ContinuityAnnouncement First on BBC 1,]] [[LampshadeHanging a little later than originally billed...]]'']]

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[[caption-width-right:350:''[[ContinuityAnnouncement First on BBC 1,]] One,]] [[LampshadeHanging a little later than originally billed...]]'']]



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[[caption-width-right:350:''[[ContinuityAnnouncement First on BBC 1,]] [[LampshadeHanging a little later than originally billed...]]'']]





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\n[[caption-width-right:350:''[[DevelopmentHell We rejoin the TARDIS for another adventure in time and space with... "Doctor Who".]]'']]


The one screwed over by a UsefulNotes/TVStrikes.

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The one screwed over by a UsefulNotes/TVStrikes.
[[UsefulNotes/TVStrikes shenanigans]].

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** Likewise an EnforcedTrope for the 2017 reconstruction, as the entire point was to fill in the uncompleted scenes, and so the animation resembles the actors.


* HamToHamCombat: Paul [=McGann=] vs Andrew Sachs, in the Creator/BigFinish audio version. It's [[CrowningMomentOfFunny rather magnificent]].

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* HamToHamCombat: Paul [=McGann=] vs Andrew Sachs, in the Creator/BigFinish audio version. It's [[CrowningMomentOfFunny [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments rather magnificent]].


The one screwed over by a WritersStrike.

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The one screwed over by a WritersStrike.
UsefulNotes/TVStrikes.

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* FashionDissonance: Skagra's outfit - a belted white tunic, a sparkly fedora, a glittery silver cape, a v-neck and shiny white high-waisted trousers tucked into silver platform boots - ''shrieks'' disco. In particular, it appears to be a [[WholeCostumeReference pastiche]] of the outfit worn by the disco star Sir Monti Rock III (of Disco Tek and the Sex-Olettes "[[OneHitWonder fame]]"). It ''is'' supposed to look ridiculous in-universe, and it might have been intended as a case of Skagra trying to pick an outfit that would blend in on Earth 1979 and getting it hilariously wrong, especially since he coordinates it with a carpet bag... but the story makes a point of having him dress like that when he's in space, too.

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* TheAlcatraz: Shada. Since the only way to get to it is by using the Book, breakouts from the outside are virtually impossible, and since all prisoners are put into stasis the moment they enter their cells, breakouts from the inside are also impossible. The only person to ever escape was Salyavin, who did it by avoiding getting locked into a stasis cell in the first place.


* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Salyavin wasn't really a criminal. The Time Lords were so afraid of what he ''might'' do with his powers that they locked him up (or at least, tried to lock him up) preemptively and then spread propaganda about how dangerous he was to retroactively justify their actions. In time, people assumed that the fictional stories made up by the government were the truth.

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* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: In the novelization, Salyavin wasn't really a criminal. The Time Lords were so afraid of what he ''might'' do with his powers that they locked him up (or at least, tried to lock him up) preemptively and then spread propaganda about how dangerous he was to retroactively justify their actions. In time, people assumed that the fictional stories made up by the government were the truth.

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* HiddenInPlainSight: Cambridge has so many old professors who had been around for as long as anyone could remember because of tenure that nobody noticed that Chronotis had been in their number for 300 years.
* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Salyavin wasn't really a criminal. The Time Lords were so afraid of what he ''might'' do with his powers that they locked him up (or at least, tried to lock him up) preemptively and then spread propaganda about how dangerous he was to retroactively justify their actions. In time, people assumed that the fictional stories made up by the government were the truth.

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