Follow TV Tropes

Following

History RealityEnsues / Literature

Go To


Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheHanSoloTrilogy'': Someone isn't going to kick an addiction overnight. Nor are they going to work through the issues which led them into getting addicted under a cult starting out. Unfortunately, this means Bria and Han's first affair is doomed to fail.


** The mighty leader [[spoiler:Leopardstar]] does not die during a great battle or heroic deed, as you might expect. Instead, she loses her life to...disease. A slow, painful disease that no one knows how to cure. What? They're ''feral cats''--sickness is going to hit them like a ton of bricks, even if they do have medicine cats.
** [[spoiler:Brokenstar]]'s [[ChildSoldiers kit-warriors]], who are ''three to five months old''[[note]]for comparison, normal training for apprentices ''begins'' when they are six months and ends when they're a year old[[/note]], are completely ineffective in battle, and such a blatant violation of the Code makes every Clan in the forest (including his own) hate him. [[spoiler:Brokenstar]] is quickly overthrown (partly because of these [[StupidEvil idiotic tactics]]) to make way for a more pragmatic villain.
** In ''Long Shadows'', [[spoiler:Ashfur]] proudly describes his EvilPlan in front of its intended victims, apparently believing that they're [[HonorBeforeReason too honorable]] to try and stop him. Guess who turns up mysteriously dead afterwards?

to:

** The mighty leader [[spoiler:Leopardstar]] Leopardstar does not die during a great battle or heroic deed, as you might expect. deed. Instead, she loses her life to...to disease. A slow, painful disease that no one knows how to cure. What? They're ''feral cats''--sickness is going to hit them like a ton of bricks, even if they do have medicine cats.
bricks.
** [[spoiler:Brokenstar]]'s Brokenstar's [[ChildSoldiers kit-warriors]], who kit-warriors]] are ''three three to five months old''[[note]]for old.[[note]]For comparison, normal training for apprentices ''begins'' when they are six months and ends when they're a year old[[/note]], are old.[[/note]] They're completely ineffective in battle, and such a blatant violation of the Code [[EveryoneHasStandards makes every Clan in the forest (including his own) hate him. [[spoiler:Brokenstar]] Brokenstar, including his own]]. Brokenstar is quickly overthrown (partly because of these [[StupidEvil idiotic tactics]]) to make way for a more pragmatic villain.
** In ''Long Shadows'', [[spoiler:Ashfur]] Ashfur proudly describes his EvilPlan in front of its intended victims, apparently believing that they're [[HonorBeforeReason too honorable]] to try and stop him. Guess who Later, Ashfur "mysteriously" turns up mysteriously dead afterwards?dead.

Added DiffLines:

* In the young adult novel ''Skinnybones'', Alex runs towards first base during a Little League game. First baseman and SitcomArchNemesis TJ is ready to catch a pass to get Alex out. In desperation, Alex jumps up and down screaming "BOOGA BOOGA!" This causes TJ to miss the ball, allowing Alex to score a double. Alex is jubilant that he managed to finally get one up on TJ... until the umpire calls Alex out for interfering with the play at first base.


* "Literature/TheHareAndThePineapple": The story's plot is that the pineapple challenges the hare to a long race. All of the other animals expects the pineapple to have a trick up its sleeves (despite that pineapples don't have sleeves), and cheer it on as the race begins. And... it just sits there, motionless, because pineapples can't actually move on their own.

to:

* "Literature/TheHareAndThePineapple": ''Literature/TheHareAndThePineapple'': The story's plot is that the pineapple challenges the hare to a long race. All of the other animals expects the pineapple to have a trick up its sleeves (despite that pineapples don't have sleeves), and cheer it on as the race begins. And... it just sits there, motionless, because pineapples can't actually move on their own.


* ''RealityEnsues/{{Redwall}}''



* ''RealityEnsues/WildCards''



* ''RealityEnsues/{{Redwall}}''
* ''RealityEnsues/WildCards''



* ''Literature/ThePrinceAndThePauper''

to:

* ''Literature/ThePrinceAndThePauper''''Literature/ThePrinceAndThePauper'':

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/TheWitchlands'', Safi's plans mostly fail thanks to this trope.
** At the end of the second book, she decides to challange a pirate queen to a one-on-one fight over who gets the last ship able to leave a (rapidly burning) port. Of course, in a fight between a seventeen-year-old noble girl with some knife training, and a woman who spent decades killing people, it's not Safi who emerges victorious.
** Some time later, when she has to choose between going with the Marstoki Empress to her home, leaving the Hell-Bards who aided her to potentially die, or go with the Hell-Bards and be imprisoned to life, she decides to TakeTheThirdOption and take the Hell-Bards with her to Marstok. The local politicians take one look at foreign militiamen trapsing around their palace and promptly kick them out.

Added DiffLines:

** Believe it or not, this trope was actually used in the first book. It was played for laughs, but still. When an Indian prince orders Mr. Wonka to build a palace made entirely of chocolate, the palace eventually melts.

Added DiffLines:

* Dr. Seuss is pretty much the ''last'' author you'd associate with this trope. But believe it or not, he gave us at least ''four'' examples:
** ''Literature/ThidwickTheBigHeartedMoose'' is about a moose who lets other animals live on his antlers, and the other animals think they can live on the moose's antlers forever. But then winter comes, and the moose sheds his antlers.
** ''[[Literature/YertleTheTurtleAndOtherStories Gertrude McFuzz]]'' is about a bird who wants a longer tail and finds a vine that grows magic berries that make her tail longer. When the bird decides to fly back home to show off her new tail, it weighs her down.
** At the beginning of ''Literature/IHadTroubleInGettingToSollaSollew'', the narrator trips over a rock and thinks he will stay out of trouble forever if he keeps looking forward. This doesn't stop a quail from biting his tail from behind, a mosquito from stinging his neck from above, or a gopher from biting his toe from below.
** Finally, we have ''Literature/TheLorax''. The Once-ler arrives in a gigantic forest of trees and doesn't think he will ever run out of trees to cut down. Guess what happens at the end.

Added DiffLines:

* Surprisingly happens a lot in ''Literature/TheSupervillainySaga'' novels. Indeed, these are the basis for ''The Rules of Supervillainy.''
** A lot of Gary's problems stem from the fact that he was traumatized by the execution of his brother at the hands of a {{Antihero}} vigilante in front of him. Even then, it doesn't turn him against regular superheroes or start a RoaringRampageOfRevenge like Batman or the Punisher. [[spoiler: He just tracks down the specific antihero involved and shoots him when he's visiting a prostitute.]]
** FantasticRacism is a result of regular humans being constantly subjected to escaping supervillains, monsters, alien invasions, [[GreenEyedMonster and simple jealousy over not having powers themselves.]] A lot of politicians stoke the fears of the populace while pressuring for more permanent solutions while publicly being on the sides of superheroes.
** Supervillains can and do steal whole fortunes but usually run through them quickly because they have to maintain their lairs, equipment, and armies of henchmen. If they had the psychology to manage their money well they wouldn't be supervillains.
** A {{Antihero}} pretending to be a supervillain and wise-cracking the entire time isn't viewed very fondly by heroes who are irritated as hell by his activities. It makes them look like a joke, still results in a lot of severe crimes, and makes him look like TheSociopath due to his EvilHasABadSenseOfHumor. By ''Literature/TheTournamentOfSupervillainy'', a lot of heroes just want to kick Gary's ass.
** DatingCatwoman comes with a lot of issues as [[spoiler: Gabrielle and Gary]] find out by book 5.
** It turns out that superhero combat is a lot more lethal than you'd think. The only way that people don't die all the time is the fact the Society of Superheroes use a lot of magic and specialized technology to make sure casualties are kept to a minimum. Gary, who has access to none of that, kills a bunch of people.
*** Indeed, Gary's power set is fairly modest by the standards of the universe but is extremely dangerous because he uses it in a variety of brutal CombatPragmatist ways. As such, villains who do well against heroes trying NOT to kill them don't do well against Gary at all.
*** Mandy is an incredibly gifted heroine with lots of combat training from her father but only recently someone who has taken up being a superheroine. [[spoiler: She dies saving Cindy's life in a split second combat situation.]]
*** Most superheroes don't actually have a ThouShallNotKill rule. They try ''not'' to kill supervillains whenever possible but whenever it becomes a choice of taking a supervillain alive or saving an innocent life, they move to lethal force.
*** NinetiesAntiHero types only are popular for as long as it takes the public to realize they're causing a huge amount of collateral damage and killing people who might not necessarilly be psychotic killers themselves.
*** Much like as how cops respond to copkillers, a villain who kills a superhero has the entirety of their kind descend on him until he's dealt with.


* ''Literature/TheDarkProfitsSaga'' uses RealLife economics in a StandardMedievalFantasy setting, so this trope happens by necessity. What happens when dwarven alchemists succeed in their quests to figure out how to turn useless metals into gold? Why, the entire gold standard becomes meaningless, since it's based on the rarity of gold. Most nations of Arth experience an economic decline, until most of them recover by decoupling their new currency from gold. The dwarven kingdom still hasn't recovered. They have all the gold they could ever want, but it's become WorthlessYellowRocks.

to:

* ''Literature/TheDarkProfitsSaga'' ''Literature/TheDarkProfitSaga'' uses RealLife economics in a StandardMedievalFantasy setting, so this trope happens by necessity. What happens when dwarven alchemists succeed in their quests to figure out how to turn useless metals into gold? Why, the entire gold standard becomes meaningless, since it's based on the rarity of gold. Most nations of Arth experience an economic decline, until most of them recover by decoupling their new currency from gold. The dwarven kingdom still hasn't recovered. They have all the gold they could ever want, but it's become WorthlessYellowRocks.

Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheDarkProfitsSaga'' uses RealLife economics in a StandardMedievalFantasy setting, so this trope happens by necessity. What happens when dwarven alchemists succeed in their quests to figure out how to turn useless metals into gold? Why, the entire gold standard becomes meaningless, since it's based on the rarity of gold. Most nations of Arth experience an economic decline, until most of them recover by decoupling their new currency from gold. The dwarven kingdom still hasn't recovered. They have all the gold they could ever want, but it's become WorthlessYellowRocks.


* A central theme of the Stephen King novel ''FromABuick8'' is the impenetrable ambiguity surrounding the titular Buick. The Police at troop D have been watching over the thing and studying it for well over twenty years, and by the end of it, besides some basic ground rules regarding safety around it (which they know is far from perfect) and some theories surrounding where it's from and the creatures it 'births', they know about as much about it as they did when it first arrived. After all, they're just police officers studying the thing as a glorified hobby in their spare time, and the Buick is something completely alien to them and to this world in nearly every way. Because of this, all the remaining police can offer the boy they're relating their story of the Buick to is scattered anecdotes centering around the Buick, and his unwillingness to accept that there simply ''isn't'' a concrete explanation and resolution to its story is a constant source of frustration to them.

to:

* A central theme of the Stephen King novel ''FromABuick8'' ''Literature/FromABuick8'' is the impenetrable ambiguity surrounding the titular Buick. The Police at troop D have been watching over the thing and studying it for well over twenty years, and by the end of it, besides some basic ground rules regarding safety around it (which they know is far from perfect) and some theories surrounding where it's from and the creatures it 'births', they know about as much about it as they did when it first arrived. After all, they're just police officers studying the thing as a glorified hobby in their spare time, and the Buick is something completely alien to them and to this world in nearly every way. Because of this, all the remaining police can offer the boy they're relating their story of the Buick to is scattered anecdotes centering around the Buick, and his unwillingness to accept that there simply ''isn't'' a concrete explanation and resolution to its story is a constant source of frustration to them.

Added DiffLines:

*** At one point in the story, a Case-53 confronts her creators, who tell her that they gave her a second chance, as she was going to die unless they rescued her. She flatly tells them that not only did she not ask for that chance, if they'd actually asked her, she would have told them she'd rather die than be what they turned her into. She also lists other Case-53's who are constantly suffering from what they've become, hammering in the point.

Added DiffLines:

** ''Raising Dragons'' also recognizes the dangers of parachuting at a low altitude, and with two people using one parachute. Nearly everyone that did so got injured -- and possibly would have been ''killed'' had the trees not softened their landing.

Added DiffLines:

** In ''Echoes of Honor'' The Peoples Republic of Haven use the trope to create a perfect prison planet: they dump the prisoners in small, unguarded, camps all over the planet, separated by hundreds or thousands of kilometers, and feed the people in the camps just enough food for their needs but with no excess, because the biochemistry of the planet's life is incompatible with humans. The humans prisoners could walk away from the camps any time they wanted to, but they'd have nowhere else to get food to stay alive, and they can't stockpile any to take with them.
*** In the same book, the same lack of local food creates problems for Harrington: they have to ration the food they have on their shuttle, but because of her inherited genetic mods which make her stronger and faster than an unmodded human, Harrington also has a faster metabolism. What are adequate rations for the rest of her crew is a starvation diet for her, made worse because she's not recovered from the abuse she received from StateSec and loss of her arm.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 396

Top

Example of:

/
/

Feedback