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[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/masterson_inheritence.jpg]]


''The Masterson Inheritance'' was a BBC radio show which mixed [[{{Improv}} improvisational comedy]] in the style of WhoseLineIsItAnyway with a parody of {{Generational Saga}}s. Each half-hour episode would see the cast (Josie Lawrence, Paul Merton, Phelim [=McDermott=], Caroline Quentin, Lee Simpson and Jim Sweeney, several of whom were already regular or semi-regular players on the UK version of ''Whose Line'') be given a particular historical setting and, incorporating suggestions from the audience, improvise a new chapter in the saga of the irrepressible Masterson clan. One of them, usually Lee Simpson, would act as {{Narrator}} and keep the plot running, while the rest would play the various characters that appeared, always ending up with multiple roles.

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''The Masterson Inheritance'' was a BBC radio show which mixed [[{{Improv}} improvisational comedy]] in the style of WhoseLineIsItAnyway ''Series/WhoseLineIsItAnyway'' with a parody of {{Generational Saga}}s. Each half-hour episode would see the cast (Josie Lawrence, Paul Merton, Phelim [=McDermott=], Caroline Quentin, Lee Simpson and Jim Sweeney, several of whom were already regular or semi-regular players on the UK version of ''Whose Line'') be given a particular historical setting and, incorporating suggestions from the audience, improvise a new chapter in the saga of the irrepressible Masterson clan. One of them, usually Lee Simpson, would act as {{Narrator}} and keep the plot running, while the rest would play the various characters that appeared, always ending up with multiple roles.


* TalkingToHimself: Roughly OnceAnEpisode; the narrator would set up a situation so that two characters played by the same actor would ''have'' to have a conversation with one another. Paul Merton got the brunt of these, and would often wriggle out of it by having one of the characters tell the other to shut up -- or just knocking out or killing off whichever one had the most annoying accent.


* AllWomenAreLustful: Most of the female characters seem to be, as both Josie Lawrence and Caroline Quentin keep making sex jokes.

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* AllWomenAreLustful: Most of the female characters seem to be, as both Josie Lawrence and Caroline Quentin keep making sex jokes. Josie Lawrence would occasionally try to play an innocent and virginal character, but somehow, since nobody seemed able to take her seriously as innocent and virginal, said character would always turn out to in reality be a LovableSexManiac who ReallyGetsAround.


** Invoked, {{Lampshaded}} and parodied in the episode ''The Sweat of the Mastersons'', where Phelim [=McDermott=] in one early scene is more or less forced into the role of Josie Lawrence's mother. This eventually leads into one of the two major plots of the episode, in which another (male) character played by Phelim gets a job as a "female impersinator."

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** Invoked, {{Lampshaded}} and parodied in the episode ''The Sweat of the Mastersons'', where Phelim [=McDermott=] in one early scene is more or less forced into the role of Josie Lawrence's mother. This eventually leads into one of the two major plots of the episode, in which another (male) character played by Phelim gets a job as a "female impersinator.impersonator."

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* TheGadfly: While the entire cast operated on RuleOfFunny, Paul Merton would steadfastly refuse to take anything seriously and would often go off on random notes, refuse to go along with a particular idea or plotline, or deliver a TakeThat at one or more of the other performers, just to mess with them.

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* IdiotBall: Any character might at any time lose all intelligence and do increasingly stupid things, if the performer deems that [[RuleOfFunny funnier]].

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* RuleOfFunny: Drives pretty much everything that happens.

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* SuspiciouslySpecificDenial: In the episode ''The Jousting Mastersons'', the Baron's illegitimate son Adam makes a spectacular one before the titular jousting:
-->'''Adam:''' Heya, Dad. Just came to see you, Dad, wish you good luck. Good luck tomorrow.\\
'''Baron:''' Good luck?\\
'''Adam:''' Aye, good luck, want you to win, like, you know. Thought I might take care of your jousting... lance. As they call it. You know, overnight, and maybe polish it.\\
'''Baron:''' Do you mean that?\\
'''Adam:''' Aye. I'd like to polish your lance with this saw. -- with this ''cloth!'' There won't be a saw in the room when I'm doing your lance! I'm not gonna saw through it or anything like that! Cause that would be a stupid thing, cause then it would break and you'd die and I'd take over the castle, like, you know, so I'll just use a cloth, ''no'' saw. There won't be a saw with your lance in the room with me.\\
'''Baron:''' All right then. That's the first time you've shown me any affection since you was born!


* CrossDressingVoices: Mostly averted; the male performers play male roles while Josie Lawrence and Catherine Quentin play the female roles -- but on a few rare occasions there is a call for one of them to play a character of the opposite gender.

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* CrossDressingVoices: Mostly averted; the male performers play male roles while Josie Lawrence and Catherine Caroline Quentin play the female roles -- but on a few rare occasions there is a call for one of them to play a character of the opposite gender.


* DeadpanSnarker: The entire cast, but Paul Merton and Lee Simpson especially.



* TalkingToHimself: Roughly OnceAnEpisode; the narrator would set up a situation so that two characters played by the same actor would ''have'' to have a conversation with one another. Paul Merton got the brunt of these, and would often wriggle out of it by having one of the character tell the other to shut up -- or just knocking out or killing off whichever one had the most annoying accent.

to:

* TalkingToHimself: Roughly OnceAnEpisode; the narrator would set up a situation so that two characters played by the same actor would ''have'' to have a conversation with one another. Paul Merton got the brunt of these, and would often wriggle out of it by having one of the character characters tell the other to shut up -- or just knocking out or killing off whichever one had the most annoying accent.


* CrossesTheLineTwice: Several times.

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* CrossesTheLineTwice: Several times.


* AllWomenAreLustful: Most of the female characters seem to be, as both Josie Lawrence and Caroline Quentin keep making sex jokes.



* AnyoneCanDie: For comic effect or just because a cast member is tired of playing that character.



* DescriptionCut: Happens all the time, when the actors decide to subvert and make fun of the narration.



* IdiosyncraticEpisodeNaming: All the episodes, titles suggested by the audience, have the name "Masterson" in them, because Lee Simpson took care to request this -- but on two occasions he forgot this, leading to two [[OddNameOut episodes in which the name "Masterson" is not mentioned]], ''Scurvy!'' in the first season and ''[[ItMakesSenseInContext The Quest For The Other Rabbit's Foot]]'' in the second season.

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* IdiosyncraticEpisodeNaming: All the episodes, titles episode titles, suggested by the audience, have the name "Masterson" in them, because Lee Simpson took care to request this -- but on two occasions he forgot this, forgot, leading to two [[OddNameOut episodes in which the name "Masterson" is does not mentioned]], appear in the title]], ''Scurvy!'' in the first season and ''[[ItMakesSenseInContext The Quest For The Other Rabbit's Foot]]'' in the second season.

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