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Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

to:

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown."''


->I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.
--> Falstaff


->How many thousand of my poorest subjects
->Are at this hour asleep! O sleep, O gentle sleep,
->Nature’s soft nurse, how have I frighted thee,
->That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down
->And steep my senses in forgetfulness?
->Why rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs,
->Upon uneasy pallets stretching thee
->And hushed with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber,
->Than in the perfumed chambers of the great,
->Under the canopies of costly state,
->And lull’d with sound of sweetest melody?
->O thou dull god, why liest thou with the vile
->In loathsome beds and leavest the kingly couch
->A watch-case or a common 'larum bell?
->Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast
->Seal up the shipboy’s eyes, and rock his brains
->In cradle of the rude imperious surge
->And in the visitation of the winds,
->Who take the ruffian billows by the top,
->Curling their monstrous heads and hanging them
->With deafening clamor in the slippery clouds
->That with the hurly death itself awakes?
->Canst thou, O partial sleep, give thy repose
->To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude,
->And in the calmest and most stillest night,
->With all appliances and means to boot,
->Deny it to a King? Then, happy low, lie down!
->Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
--> King Henry IV

->We have heard the chimes at midnight, Master Shallow
--> Falstaff

to:

->I ->''"I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.
--> Falstaff


->How
men."''
-->-- '''Falstaff'''


->''"How
many thousand of my poorest subjects
->Are
subjects\\
Are
at this hour asleep! O sleep, O gentle sleep,
->Nature’s
sleep,\\
Nature’s
soft nurse, how have I frighted thee,
->That
thee,\\
That
thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down
->And
down\\
And
steep my senses in forgetfulness?
->Why
forgetfulness?\\
Why
rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs,
->Upon
cribs,\\
Upon
uneasy pallets stretching thee
->And
thee\\
And
hushed with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber,
->Than
slumber,\\
Than
in the perfumed chambers of the great,
->Under
great,\\
Under
the canopies of costly state,
->And
state,\\
And
lull’d with sound of sweetest melody?
->O
melody?\\
O
thou dull god, why liest thou with the vile
->In
vile\\
In
loathsome beds and leavest the kingly couch
->A
couch\\
A
watch-case or a common 'larum bell?
->Wilt
bell?\\
Wilt
thou upon the high and giddy mast
->Seal
mast\\
Seal
up the shipboy’s eyes, and rock his brains
->In
brains\\
In
cradle of the rude imperious surge
->And
surge\\
And
in the visitation of the winds,
->Who
winds,\\
Who
take the ruffian billows by the top,
->Curling
top,\\
Curling
their monstrous heads and hanging them
->With
them\\
With
deafening clamor in the slippery clouds
->That
clouds\\
That
with the hurly death itself awakes?
->Canst
awakes?\\
Canst
thou, O partial sleep, give thy repose
->To
repose\\
To
the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude,
->And
rude,\\
And
in the calmest and most stillest night,
->With
night,\\
With
all appliances and means to boot,
->Deny
boot,\\
Deny
it to a King? Then, happy low, lie down!
->Uneasy
down!\\
Uneasy
lies the head that wears a crown.
--> King -->-- '''King Henry IV

->We
IV'''

->''"We
have heard the chimes at midnight, Master Shallow
--> Falstaff
Shallow"''
-->-- '''Falstaff'''

----



to:

--> Falstaff





->We have heard the chimes at midnight, Master Shallow

to:

\n--> King Henry IV

->We have heard the chimes at midnight, Master ShallowShallow
--> Falstaff


->I am not only witty in myself, but the cause that wit is in other men.



->Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

to:

->Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.crown.

->We have heard the chimes at midnight, Master Shallow


* ->How many thousand of my poorest subjects

to:

* ->How many thousand of my poorest subjects

Added DiffLines:

* ->How many thousand of my poorest subjects
->Are at this hour asleep! O sleep, O gentle sleep,
->Nature’s soft nurse, how have I frighted thee,
->That thou no more wilt weigh my eyelids down
->And steep my senses in forgetfulness?
->Why rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs,
->Upon uneasy pallets stretching thee
->And hushed with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber,
->Than in the perfumed chambers of the great,
->Under the canopies of costly state,
->And lull’d with sound of sweetest melody?
->O thou dull god, why liest thou with the vile
->In loathsome beds and leavest the kingly couch
->A watch-case or a common 'larum bell?
->Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast
->Seal up the shipboy’s eyes, and rock his brains
->In cradle of the rude imperious surge
->And in the visitation of the winds,
->Who take the ruffian billows by the top,
->Curling their monstrous heads and hanging them
->With deafening clamor in the slippery clouds
->That with the hurly death itself awakes?
->Canst thou, O partial sleep, give thy repose
->To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude,
->And in the calmest and most stillest night,
->With all appliances and means to boot,
->Deny it to a King? Then, happy low, lie down!
->Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

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