Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Pinball / BlackHole

Go To






** RealityIsUnrealistic: Objects actually ''can'' orbit a black hole without falling in.

to:

** RealityIsUnrealistic: Objects actually ''can'' orbit a black hole without falling in.in, however.


''Black Hole'' is not for the timid many players were turned off by the table's difficulty, and the reversed lower playfield was guaranteed to disorient new players. Getting multiball is difficult and considered an incredible achievement, which explains why its highly regarded by players looking for a challenge. Even today, it remains an interesting piece of pinball history for its design and art.

to:

''Black Hole'' is not for the timid many players were turned off by the table's difficulty, and the reversed lower playfield was is guaranteed to disorient new players. Getting multiball is difficult and considered an incredible achievement, which explains why its highly regarded by players looking for a challenge. Even today, it remains an interesting piece of pinball history for its design and art.


It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players by saying "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole. Both features were taken out of the export version. The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.

The original concept for ''Black Hole'' came from [[PromotedFanboy Joe Cicak, a pinball player from Pennsylvania]] who was curious on how to use the empty space inside a conventional pinball table. After watching Creator/CarlSagan's ''Series/CosmosAPersonalVoyage'', he and his friends were inspired to build a prototype game; when the actual game proved fun to play, they decided to present it to Gottlieb, who were making games with large playfields. Gottlieb, already under pressure for innovative table designs from the success of [[Creator/WilliamsElectronics Williams']] ''Pinball/BlackKnight'', quickly agreed to purchase the rights.

to:

It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," Hole", a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players by saying "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole. Both features were taken out of the export version. The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.

The original concept for ''Black Hole'' came from [[PromotedFanboy Joe Cicak, a pinball player from Pennsylvania]] who was curious on how to use the empty space inside a conventional pinball table. After watching Creator/CarlSagan's ''Series/CosmosAPersonalVoyage'', he and his friends were inspired to build a prototype game; when the actual game proved fun to play, they decided to present it to Gottlieb, who were making games with large playfields. Gottlieb, already under pressure for innovative table designs from the success of [[Creator/WilliamsElectronics Williams']] ''Pinball/BlackKnight'', quickly agreed to purchase the rights.



** RealityIsUnrealistic: Objects actually can orbit a black hole without falling in.

to:

** RealityIsUnrealistic: Objects actually can ''can'' orbit a black hole without falling in.


* NintendoHard: This game is notorious for being a drain monster.

to:

* NintendoHard: This game is a notorious for being a drain monster.


* UnrealisticBlackHole: The nature of the spinning black hole on the backglass means that the trapped astronauts are somehow moving with it.

to:

* UnrealisticBlackHole: The nature of the spinning black hole on the backglass means that the trapped astronauts are somehow moving with it.


** RealityIsUnrealistic, objects actually can orbit a black hole without falling in.

to:

** RealityIsUnrealistic, objects RealityIsUnrealistic: Objects actually can orbit a black hole without falling in.


The original concept for ''Black Hole'' came from [[PromotedFanboy Joe Cicak, a pinball player from Pennsylvania]] who was curious on how to use the empty space inside a conventional pinball table. After watching Creator/CarlSagan's ''Series/{{Cosmos}}'', he and his friends were inspired to build a prototype game; when the actual game proved fun to play, they decided to present it to Gottlieb, who were making games with large playfields. Gottlieb, already under pressure for innovative table designs from the success of [[Creator/WilliamsElectronics Williams']] ''Pinball/BlackKnight'', quickly agreed to purchase the rights.

to:

The original concept for ''Black Hole'' came from [[PromotedFanboy Joe Cicak, a pinball player from Pennsylvania]] who was curious on how to use the empty space inside a conventional pinball table. After watching Creator/CarlSagan's ''Series/{{Cosmos}}'', ''Series/CosmosAPersonalVoyage'', he and his friends were inspired to build a prototype game; when the actual game proved fun to play, they decided to present it to Gottlieb, who were making games with large playfields. Gottlieb, already under pressure for innovative table designs from the success of [[Creator/WilliamsElectronics Williams']] ''Pinball/BlackKnight'', quickly agreed to purchase the rights.


A digital version of the game is available for ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade''.

to:

A digital version Digital versions of the game is are available for ''Pinball Hall of Fame: The Gottlieb Collection'' and ''VideoGame/ThePinballArcade''.

Added DiffLines:

* ThePlace


->''"Do you dare to enter the black hole?"''

to:

->''"Do you dare to enter the black hole?"''
Black Hole?"''



It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players by saying "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole that constantly rotated. Both features were taken out of the export version. The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.

to:

It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players by saying "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole that constantly rotated.hole. Both features were taken out of the export version. The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.


It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole that constantly rotated. Both features were taken out of the export version. The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but a point [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.

The original concept for ''Black Hole'' came from [[PromotedFanboy Joe Cicak, a pinball player from Pennsylvania]] who was curious on how to use the empty space inside a conventional pinball table. After watching Creator/CarlSagan's ''Series/{{Cosmos}}'', he and his friends were inspired to build a prototype game; when the actual game proved fun to play, they decided to present it to Gottlieb, who were making games with large playfields. Gottlieb, already under pressure for innovative table designs from the success of [[Creator/WilliamsElectronics Williams']] ''Pinball/BlackKnight,'' quickly agreed to purchase the rights.

As a pinball game, ''Black Hole'' is not for the timid many players were turned off by the table's difficulty, and the reversed lower playfield was guaranteed to disorient new players. Getting to multiball was a difficult feat and is considered an incredible achievement, which explains why its highly regarded by players looking for a challenge. Even today, it remains an interesting piece of pinball history for its design and art.

to:

It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players by saying "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole that constantly rotated. Both features were taken out of the export version. The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but a point [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.

The original concept for ''Black Hole'' came from [[PromotedFanboy Joe Cicak, a pinball player from Pennsylvania]] who was curious on how to use the empty space inside a conventional pinball table. After watching Creator/CarlSagan's ''Series/{{Cosmos}}'', he and his friends were inspired to build a prototype game; when the actual game proved fun to play, they decided to present it to Gottlieb, who were making games with large playfields. Gottlieb, already under pressure for innovative table designs from the success of [[Creator/WilliamsElectronics Williams']] ''Pinball/BlackKnight,'' ''Pinball/BlackKnight'', quickly agreed to purchase the rights.

As a pinball game, ''Black Hole'' is not for the timid many players were turned off by the table's difficulty, and the reversed lower playfield was guaranteed to disorient new players. Getting to multiball was a is difficult feat and is considered an incredible achievement, which explains why its highly regarded by players looking for a challenge. Even today, it remains an interesting piece of pinball history for its design and art.



* MachineMonotone: Unlike Williams' machines at the time which used human voices, the above quote (and all other dialogue) is spoken by a Vortrax SC-01 voice synthesis chip.

to:

* MachineMonotone: Unlike Williams' machines at the time which used human voices, the above quote (and all other dialogue) is spoken said by a Vortrax SC-01 voice synthesis chip.



* NoPlotNoProblem


As a pinball game, ''Black Hole'' is not for the timid -- many players were turned off by the table's difficulty, and the reversed lower playfield was guaranteed to disorient new players. Though it didn't feature a WizardMode, getting to multiball was a difficult feat and is considered an incredible achievement, which explains why it's highly regarded by players looking for a challenge. Even today, it remains an interesting piece of pinball history for its design and art.

to:

As a pinball game, ''Black Hole'' is not for the timid -- many players were turned off by the table's difficulty, and the reversed lower playfield was guaranteed to disorient new players. Though it didn't feature a WizardMode, getting Getting to multiball was a difficult feat and is considered an incredible achievement, which explains why it's its highly regarded by players looking for a challenge. Even today, it remains an interesting piece of pinball history for its design and art.



* NintendoHard: This game is rather notorious for being a drain monster.

to:

* NintendoHard: This game is rather notorious for being a drain monster.


It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during its AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole that constantly rotated. Both features that were taken out of the export version. The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but a point [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.

to:

It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during its AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole that constantly rotated. Both features that were taken out of the export version. The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but a point [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.


It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during its AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole that constantly rotated.[[note]]though both of these features were taken out of the export version[[/note]] The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but a point [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.

to:

It had a number of features going for it, the most striking of which were the dual playfields: a normal playfield, and the "Black Hole," a reversed playfield embedded underneath, visible through a transparent hole in the table. It also featured speech, something of a novelty at the time, with the game memorably taunting prospective players "Do you dare to enter the Black Hole?" during its AttractMode. Finally, it featured an eye-catching mirrored backglass with a rotating black hole that constantly rotated.[[note]]though both of these Both features that were taken out of the export version[[/note]] version. The game cost 50 cents to play, which was fairly extravagant at the time, but a point [[http://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=307&picno=5050 played up in marketing]] to promote the game's earning potential.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 26

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report