Follow TV Tropes

Following

History NightmareFuel / LastWeekTonightWithJohnOliver

Go To



* When discussing crimes that members of the border patrol committed, one man admits to having blacked out for three hours, and woken up to find that his kitchen was covered in blood. While john tries to joke about it immediately afterward, the scenario is still pretty gruesome and [[NothingIsScarier the show never actually explains how it happened]].

to:

* When discussing crimes that members of the border patrol committed, one man admits to having blacked out for three hours, and woken up to find that his kitchen was covered in blood. While john John tries to joke about it immediately afterward, the scenario is still pretty gruesome and [[NothingIsScarier the show never actually explains how it happened]].


* When discussing crimes that members of the border patrol committed, one man admits to having blacked out for three hours, and woken up to find that his kitchen was covered in blood.

to:

* When discussing crimes that members of the border patrol committed, one man admits to having blacked out for three hours, and woken up to find that his kitchen was covered in blood. While john tries to joke about it immediately afterward, the scenario is still pretty gruesome and [[NothingIsScarier the show never actually explains how it happened]].

Added DiffLines:

** It is also unsettling that despite the credit report marking the first person as a terrorist, there is no mention that this in any way led to the police getting involved. This means that a) there is no system that automatically flags credit information on ''known terrorists'' being requested, and b) none of the human beings who handled this information thought they should inform the police.


* A clip of Monica Lewinsky being hounded by the press shortly after the infamous scandal broke out.

to:

* A In the episode about public and online shaming, a clip of Monica Lewinsky being hounded by the press shortly after the infamous scandal broke out.


* The segment about climbing Mount Everest: John presents the most frightening aspects of climbing Mount Everest, from the fact that the surface area of the summit is only roughly that of two ping-pong tables, to the fact that the amount of climbers a year, numbering two-to-three hundred, and with possibly only ''half'' of them truly qualified, are forced to climb up and down the mountain in a ''single-file line'' in the span of just three days due to terrain and weather (meaning if any climber stops suddenly, a few dozen more are trapped behind them), to the ''very'' precarious and deadly work of the Icefall Doctor sherpas who prepare the route for tourist season. Regarding that last one, John plays a clip from a BBC documentary about one sherpa who has to climb over a crevasse on the infamous Khumbu Icefall, probably the same one his friend died on just weeks earlier, on three ladders held together with only rope, wobbling on the other end. The terror and grief on his face are just ''palpable''. John tells us he makes it across fine, but we don't see the actual ending of the excerpt.
** John also talks about the effects of some of the worst tourist companies in Nepal, and their poor practices in vetting wannabe climbers, especially after Everest's mountaineering tours' commercialization in the 1990s. He shows the tragic case of one inexperienced Canadian tourist in 2015, who was not properly vetted, and had to learn the ''very basics'' of rock climbing. The company she chose was so ill-prepared that she ''died'' on the way down after she made it to the summit.
** The sheer fact that hundreds of lower-class sherpas making just as many trips up Everest over a lifetime are the backbone of the Nepalese tourism industry, and that they have died facing the very conditions described above.
** Not to mention the physiological effects of being in the "death zone" above 26,000 feet (7925 m), where oxygen levels are at only 30% of sea level. They include severe fatigue, increased risk of frostbite and gangrene, indigestion, impaired judgement often leading to "[[PyrrhicVictory summit]] [[TragicDream fever]]", and ''[[BodyHorror your oxygen-starved brain being squeezed in the direction of your spinal cord.]]''
** The amounts of waste, including human waste, are such that one expedition early in 2019 recovered ''29,000 pounds (13,154 kg)'' in garbage, and some of it is ''trickling downslope and polluting the groundwater of surrounding villages.''
** The saddest part is either the late Sir Edmund Hillary, the first Westerner to summit Everest, expressing his disappointment that most climbers have almost no passion for the art of mountaineering, or the fact that all these deaths could have been prevented, but the Nepalese government and economy are so reliant on an unregulated tourism industry because they have little opportunity to diversify.


Added DiffLines:

* The segment about climbing Mount Everest: John presents the most frightening aspects of climbing Mount Everest, from the fact that the surface area of the summit is only roughly that of two ping-pong tables, to the fact that the amount of climbers a year, numbering two-to-three hundred, and with possibly only ''half'' of them truly qualified, are forced to climb up and down the mountain in a ''single-file line'' in the span of just three days due to terrain and weather (meaning if any climber stops suddenly, a few dozen more are trapped behind them), to the ''very'' precarious and deadly work of the Icefall Doctor sherpas who prepare the route for tourist season. Regarding that last one, John plays a clip from a BBC documentary about one sherpa who has to climb over a crevasse on the infamous Khumbu Icefall, probably the same one his friend died on just weeks earlier, on three ladders held together with only rope, wobbling on the other end. The terror and grief on his face are just ''palpable''. John tells us he makes it across fine, but we don't see the actual ending of the excerpt.
** John also talks about the effects of some of the worst tourist companies in Nepal, and their poor practices in vetting wannabe climbers, especially after Everest's mountaineering tours' commercialization in the 1990s. He shows the tragic case of one inexperienced Canadian tourist in 2015, who was not properly vetted, and had to learn the ''very basics'' of rock climbing. The company she chose was so ill-prepared that she ''died'' on the way down after she made it to the summit.
** The sheer fact that hundreds of lower-class sherpas making just as many trips up Everest over a lifetime are the backbone of the Nepalese tourism industry, and that they have died facing the very conditions described above.
** Not to mention the physiological effects of being in the "death zone" above 26,000 feet (7925 m), where oxygen levels are at only 30% of sea level. They include severe fatigue, increased risk of frostbite and gangrene, indigestion, impaired judgement often leading to "[[PyrrhicVictory summit]] [[TragicDream fever]]", and ''[[BodyHorror your oxygen-starved brain being squeezed in the direction of your spinal cord.]]''
** The amounts of waste, including human waste, are such that one expedition early in 2019 recovered ''29,000 pounds (13,154 kg)'' in garbage, and some of it is ''trickling downslope and polluting the groundwater of surrounding villages.''
** The saddest part is either the late Sir Edmund Hillary, the first Westerner to summit Everest, expressing his disappointment that most climbers have almost no passion for the art of mountaineering, or the fact that all these deaths could have been prevented, but the Nepalese government and economy are so reliant on an unregulated tourism industry because they have little opportunity to diversify.


* The segment about climbing Mount Everest: John presents the most frightening aspects of climbing Mount Everest, from the fact that the surface area of the summit is only roughly that of two ping-pong tables, to the fact that the amount of climbers a year, numbering two-to-three hundred, and with possibly only ''half'' of them truly qualified, are forced to climb up and down the mountain in a ''single-file line'' in the span of just three days due to terrain and weather (meaning if any climber stops suddenly, a few dozen more are trapped behind them), to the ''very'' precarious and deadly work of the Icefall Doctor sherpas who prepare the route for tourist season. Regarding that last one, John plays a clip from a BBC documentary about one sherpa who has to climb over a crevasse on the infamous Khumbu Icefall, probably the same one his friend died on just weeks earlier, on three ladders held together with only rope, wobbling on the other end. The terror and grief on his face are just ''palpable''. [[spoiler: John tells us he makes it across fine, but we don't see the actual ending of the excerpt. YourMileageMayVary on the editors replacing the ending with a [[JustForFun/RickRoll rickroll]] to defuse the tension, considering NothingIsScarier was at play.]]
** John also talks about the effects of some of the worst tourist companies in Nepal, and their poor practices in vetting wannabe climbers, especially after Everest's mountaineering tours' commercialization in the 1990s. He shows the tragic case of one inexperienced Canadian tourist in 2015, who was not properly vetted, and had to learn the ''very basics'' of rock climbing. [[spoiler: The company she chose was so ill-prepared that she ''died'' on the way down after she made it to the summit.]]

to:

* The segment about climbing Mount Everest: John presents the most frightening aspects of climbing Mount Everest, from the fact that the surface area of the summit is only roughly that of two ping-pong tables, to the fact that the amount of climbers a year, numbering two-to-three hundred, and with possibly only ''half'' of them truly qualified, are forced to climb up and down the mountain in a ''single-file line'' in the span of just three days due to terrain and weather (meaning if any climber stops suddenly, a few dozen more are trapped behind them), to the ''very'' precarious and deadly work of the Icefall Doctor sherpas who prepare the route for tourist season. Regarding that last one, John plays a clip from a BBC documentary about one sherpa who has to climb over a crevasse on the infamous Khumbu Icefall, probably the same one his friend died on just weeks earlier, on three ladders held together with only rope, wobbling on the other end. The terror and grief on his face are just ''palpable''. [[spoiler: John tells us he makes it across fine, but we don't see the actual ending of the excerpt. YourMileageMayVary on the editors replacing the ending with a [[JustForFun/RickRoll rickroll]] to defuse the tension, considering NothingIsScarier was at play.]]
excerpt.
** John also talks about the effects of some of the worst tourist companies in Nepal, and their poor practices in vetting wannabe climbers, especially after Everest's mountaineering tours' commercialization in the 1990s. He shows the tragic case of one inexperienced Canadian tourist in 2015, who was not properly vetted, and had to learn the ''very basics'' of rock climbing. [[spoiler: The company she chose was so ill-prepared that she ''died'' on the way down after she made it to the summit.]]



* As bad as Trump is, Brazilian candidate (and, as of January 1st, ''president'') UsefulNotes/JairBolsonaro is ''even worse'' - in addition to being hideously racist,[[note]]He's called refugees arriving in Brazil "the scum of the world"[[/note]] sexist,[[note]]Saying he wouldn't rape a female MP ''because she isn't worth it''[[/note]] and homophobic,[[note]]Advocating parents ''whip'' their kids if they're gay and accusing adult gays of trying to "recruit" children[[/note]] the man is a bona fide fascist, proudly advocating torture and defending the UsefulNotes/BrazilianMilitaryRegime, saying their (along with UsefulNotes/AugustoPinochet, which the show didn't mention) only mistake was ''not killing enough people''. It is also apparent that there is something ''not quite right'' in Bolsonaro's head - when Creator/EllenPage asked him in an interview if he thought [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder her parents should have beaten her to make her not gay]], Bolsonaro responded by ''calling her pretty and saying he'd wolf-whistle at her if he was still in the army and saw her on the street''. '''''Think''''' about what is going on in someone's head to make them think that kind of response is acceptable for that kind of question.

to:

* As bad as Trump is, Brazilian candidate (and, as of January 1st, ''president'') UsefulNotes/JairBolsonaro is ''even worse'' - in addition to being hideously racist,[[note]]He's called refugees arriving in Brazil "the scum of the world"[[/note]] sexist,[[note]]Saying he wouldn't rape a female MP ''because she isn't worth it''[[/note]] and homophobic,[[note]]Advocating parents ''whip'' their kids if they're gay and accusing adult gays of trying to "recruit" children[[/note]] the man is a bona fide fascist, proudly advocating torture and defending the UsefulNotes/BrazilianMilitaryRegime, saying their (along with UsefulNotes/AugustoPinochet, which the show didn't mention) only mistake was ''not killing enough people''. It is also apparent that there is something ''not quite right'' in Bolsonaro's head - when Creator/EllenPage asked him in an interview if he thought [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder her parents should have beaten her to make her not gay]], Bolsonaro responded by ''calling her pretty and saying he'd wolf-whistle at her if he was still in the army and saw her on the street''. '''''Think''''' '''Think''' about what is going on in someone's head to make them think that kind of response is acceptable for that kind of question.



* Even ''robocalls'', something that we consider to just be a nuisance that we want to get rid of, have some element of nightmare fuel. While we mostly view them as nuisances to get rid of, they can be pretty ominous, potentially making more gullible people fall prey to scammers with calls of lawsuits and arrest warrants, or even taking advantage of things such as late payments to persist their calls, such as with one woman who was late with her mortgage once and got bombarded with harassing robocalls. Not to mention spoofing, where robocalls can easily trick you into answering their calls by calling from the guise of specific organizations or even people you know, as was demonstrated by Susan Collins and one of her staff members, and Jeff Rosen with a cybersecurity expert who called Rosen's mother from Rosen's phone and tricked her into giving out her social security number. Not helping was the fact that even Ajit Pai, the ''chairman of the FCC'' fell for a robocall in the middle of giving a speech about fighting them.
** Another example is of a guy who received a robocall and decided to mess around with it by trying to get the caller to tell him that she is not a robot, [[FalseReassurance which she keeps refuting by constantly stating (only slight variations of) "I am a live person" and laughing monotonously.]] It's especially eerie that robocalls are scripted to deny that they're robots.
* The potential repercussions of Brexit and it's lack of an exit plan including but not limited to: [[AdultFear a mother fearing that she wouldn't be able to get the imported medicine necessary for her epileptic daughter]], possibly reigniting old violent conflicts between the UK and Northern Ireland, and an old man casually comparing the situation to the last two world wars which ancestors of his survived. The war comparison is especially eerie when people began buying "Brexit Boxes" full of preserved food in paint-can like containers in preparation of the lack of imported goods that could be delayed or no longer sold in stores.

to:

* Even ''robocalls'', something that we consider to just be a nuisance that we want to get rid of, have some element of nightmare fuel. While we mostly view them as nuisances to get rid of, they can be pretty ominous, potentially making more gullible people fall prey to scammers with calls of lawsuits and arrest warrants, or even taking advantage of things such as late payments to persist their calls, such as with one woman who was late with her mortgage once and got bombarded with harassing robocalls. Not to mention spoofing, where robocalls can easily trick you into answering their calls by calling from the guise of specific organizations or even people you know, as was demonstrated by Susan Collins and one of her staff members, and Jeff Rosen with a cybersecurity expert who called Rosen's mother from Rosen's phone and tricked her into giving out her social security number. Not helping was the fact that even Ajit Pai, the ''chairman of the FCC'' fell for a robocall in the middle of giving a speech about fighting them.
**
them. Another example is of a guy who received a robocall and decided to mess around with it by trying to get the caller to tell him that she is not a robot, [[FalseReassurance which she keeps refuting by constantly stating (only slight variations of) "I am a live person" and laughing monotonously.]] It's especially eerie that robocalls are scripted to deny that they're robots.
* The potential repercussions of Brexit and it's its lack of an exit plan including but not limited to: [[AdultFear a mother fearing that she wouldn't be able to get the imported medicine necessary for her epileptic daughter]], possibly reigniting old violent conflicts between the UK and Northern Ireland, and an old man casually comparing the situation to the last two world wars which ancestors of his survived. The war comparison is especially eerie when people began buying "Brexit Boxes" full of preserved food in paint-can like containers in preparation of the lack of imported goods that could be delayed or no longer sold in stores.

Added DiffLines:

** The sheer fact that hundreds of lower-class sherpas making just as many trips up Everest over a lifetime are the backbone of the Nepalese tourism industry, and that they have died facing the very conditions described above.


* The segment about climbing Mount Everest: John presents the most frightening aspects of climbing Mount Everest, from the fact that the surface area of the summit is only roughly that of two ping-pong tables, to the fact that the amount of climbers a year, numbering two-to-three hundred, and with possibly only ''half'' of them truly qualified, are forced to climb up and down the mountain in a ''single-file line'' in the span of just three days due to terrain and weather (meaning if any climber stops suddenly, a few dozen more are trapped behind them), to the ''very'' precarious and deadly work of the Icefall Doctor sherpas who prepare the route for tourist season. Regarding that last one, John plays a clip from a BBC documentary about one sherpa who has to climb over a crevasse on the infamous Khumbu Icefall, probably the same one his friend died on just weeks earlier, on three ladders held together with only rope, wobbling on the other end. The terror and grief on his face are just ''palpable''. [[spoiler: He makes it across fine, but we don't see the ending. YourMileageMayVary on the editors replacing some of the clip with a RickRoll to defuse the tension, considering NothingIsScarier is at play.]]
** John also talks about the effects of some of the worst tourist companies in Nepal, and their poor practices in vetting wannabe climbers, especially after Everest's mountaineering tours' commercialization in the 1990s. He shows the tragic case of one inexperienced Canadian tourist in 2015, who was not properly vetted, and had to learn the ''very basics'' of rock climbing. [[spoiler: The company was so ill-prepared that she ''died'' on the way down after she made it to the summit.]]

to:

* The segment about climbing Mount Everest: John presents the most frightening aspects of climbing Mount Everest, from the fact that the surface area of the summit is only roughly that of two ping-pong tables, to the fact that the amount of climbers a year, numbering two-to-three hundred, and with possibly only ''half'' of them truly qualified, are forced to climb up and down the mountain in a ''single-file line'' in the span of just three days due to terrain and weather (meaning if any climber stops suddenly, a few dozen more are trapped behind them), to the ''very'' precarious and deadly work of the Icefall Doctor sherpas who prepare the route for tourist season. Regarding that last one, John plays a clip from a BBC documentary about one sherpa who has to climb over a crevasse on the infamous Khumbu Icefall, probably the same one his friend died on just weeks earlier, on three ladders held together with only rope, wobbling on the other end. The terror and grief on his face are just ''palpable''. [[spoiler: He John tells us he makes it across fine, but we don't see the ending. actual ending of the excerpt. YourMileageMayVary on the editors replacing some of the clip ending with a RickRoll [[JustForFun/RickRoll rickroll]] to defuse the tension, considering NothingIsScarier is was at play.]]
** John also talks about the effects of some of the worst tourist companies in Nepal, and their poor practices in vetting wannabe climbers, especially after Everest's mountaineering tours' commercialization in the 1990s. He shows the tragic case of one inexperienced Canadian tourist in 2015, who was not properly vetted, and had to learn the ''very basics'' of rock climbing. [[spoiler: The company she chose was so ill-prepared that she ''died'' on the way down after she made it to the summit.]]



** The saddest part is either the late Sir Edmund Hillary, the first Westerner to summit Everest, expressing his disappointment that most climbers have almost no passion for the art of mountaineering, or the fact that all these deaths could have been prevented, but the Nepalese government and economy are so reliant on the tourism industry because they have little opportunity to diversify.

to:

** The saddest part is either the late Sir Edmund Hillary, the first Westerner to summit Everest, expressing his disappointment that most climbers have almost no passion for the art of mountaineering, or the fact that all these deaths could have been prevented, but the Nepalese government and economy are so reliant on the an unregulated tourism industry because they have little opportunity to diversify.


* The segment about Mental Illness: It showcases the incredible public stigma against the illnesses, which is not helped by the fact that one of the only times people appear willing to talk about it is in the aftermath of mass shootings. This is deceiving because mentally ill people are more likely to be the ''victims'' of violence rather than the perpetrators. John also talks about a mental healthcare program that literally puts patients on buses after an extremely brief treatment period and mentions the fact that there are more mentally ill people in ''prisons'' rather than healthcare centers.

to:

* The segment about Mental Illness: climbing Mount Everest: John presents the most frightening aspects of climbing Mount Everest, from the fact that the surface area of the summit is only roughly that of two ping-pong tables, to the fact that the amount of climbers a year, numbering two-to-three hundred, and with possibly only ''half'' of them truly qualified, are forced to climb up and down the mountain in a ''single-file line'' in the span of just three days due to terrain and weather (meaning if any climber stops suddenly, a few dozen more are trapped behind them), to the ''very'' precarious and deadly work of the Icefall Doctor sherpas who prepare the route for tourist season. Regarding that last one, John plays a clip from a BBC documentary about one sherpa who has to climb over a crevasse on the infamous Khumbu Icefall, probably the same one his friend died on just weeks earlier, on three ladders held together with only rope, wobbling on the other end. The terror and grief on his face are just ''palpable''. [[spoiler: He makes it across fine, but we don't see the ending. YourMileageMayVary on the editors replacing some of the clip with a RickRoll to defuse the tension, considering NothingIsScarier is at play.]]
** John also talks about the effects of some of the worst tourist companies in Nepal, and their poor practices in vetting wannabe climbers, especially after Everest's mountaineering tours' commercialization in the 1990s. He shows the tragic case of one inexperienced Canadian tourist in 2015, who was not properly vetted, and had to learn the ''very basics'' of rock climbing. [[spoiler: The company was so ill-prepared that she ''died'' on the way down after she made it to the summit.]]
** Not to mention the physiological effects of being in the "death zone" above 26,000 feet (7925 m), where oxygen levels are at only 30% of sea level. They include severe fatigue, increased risk of frostbite and gangrene, indigestion, impaired judgement often leading to "[[PyrrhicVictory summit]] [[TragicDream fever]]", and ''[[BodyHorror your oxygen-starved brain being squeezed in the direction of your spinal cord.]]''
** The amounts of waste, including human waste, are such that one expedition early in 2019 recovered ''29,000 pounds (13,154 kg)'' in garbage, and some of it is ''trickling downslope and polluting the groundwater of surrounding villages.''
** The saddest part is either the late Sir Edmund Hillary, the first Westerner to summit Everest, expressing his disappointment that most climbers have almost no passion for the art of mountaineering, or the fact that all these deaths could have been prevented, but the Nepalese government and economy are so reliant on the tourism industry because they have little opportunity to diversify.
* The segment about mental illness:
It showcases the incredible public stigma against the illnesses, which is not helped by the fact that one of the only times people appear willing to talk about it is in the aftermath of mass shootings. This is deceiving because mentally ill people are more likely to be the ''victims'' of violence rather than the perpetrators. John also talks about a mental healthcare program that literally puts patients on buses after an extremely brief treatment period and mentions the fact that there are more mentally ill people in ''prisons'' rather than healthcare centers.


** [[http://www.prochoiceamerica.org/what-is-choice/abortion/forced-ultrasounds.html Forced ultrasound laws]] make it mandatory for women seeking an abortion to view an ultrasound and listen to the foetal heartbeat - which has no purpose but to shame and upset the patient. Some states soften these laws by ''allowing the woman to cover her eyes and ears''. After the clip you can hear someone in the audience say, "Oh my God."
* The episode about Apple's reluctance to help the FBI break into a terrorist's cell phone is chock full of ParanoiaFuel. If Apple ever did create such a program (and they've estimated that they could do it in just a month), it will inevitably get out of control, permanently compromising every piece of digital information in existence. This is not even getting into the devices that already exist to allow people to easily get past encryptions. John concludes that even the very legitimate arguments for how helpful this program would be to law enforcement, such as allowing the FBI to access people's phones in criminal investigations that would help put more terrorists, criminals, paedophiles and the like behind bars, don't make it worth the risk, as the choice is between leaving everyone's personal information easily exploitable and giving dangerous people an easier time escaping justice. There's no upside, just the LesserOfTwoEvils. John also adds that Russia and China, two countries infamous for monitoring and censoring their citizens, have their eyes on this case.

to:

** [[http://www.prochoiceamerica.org/what-is-choice/abortion/forced-ultrasounds.html Forced ultrasound laws]] make it mandatory for women seeking an abortion to view an ultrasound and listen to the foetal fetal heartbeat - which has no purpose but to shame and upset the patient. Some states soften these laws by ''allowing the woman to cover her eyes and ears''. After the clip you can hear someone in the audience say, "Oh my God."
* The episode about Apple's reluctance to help the FBI break into a terrorist's cell phone is chock full of ParanoiaFuel. If Apple ever did create such a program (and they've estimated that they could do it in just a month), it will inevitably get out of control, permanently compromising every piece of digital information in existence. This is not even getting into the devices that already exist to allow people to easily get past encryptions. John concludes that even the very legitimate arguments for how helpful this program would be to law enforcement, such as allowing the FBI to access people's phones in criminal investigations that would help put more terrorists, criminals, paedophiles pedophiles and the like behind bars, don't make it worth the risk, as the choice is between leaving everyone's personal information easily exploitable and giving dangerous people an easier time escaping justice. There's no upside, just the LesserOfTwoEvils. John also adds that Russia and China, two countries infamous for monitoring and censoring their citizens, have their eyes on this case.



** In a cameo appereance during the Halloween 2016 episode of ''Series/TheDailyShowWithTrevorNoah'' (about a dystopic future under a Trump presidency), John is shown doing his show as usual. Then, two armoured police officers barge into the studio and take John away to be deported, implicitly for his previous shit-talking of Trump (which he wasn't even doing in the fake clip he was discussing egg safety). It's especially bad when one takes the above point about Guantanamo Bay into consideration.

to:

** In a cameo appereance appearance during the Halloween 2016 episode of ''Series/TheDailyShowWithTrevorNoah'' (about a dystopic future under a Trump presidency), John is shown doing his show as usual. Then, two armoured armored police officers barge into the studio and take John away to be deported, implicitly for his previous shit-talking of Trump (which he wasn't even doing in the fake clip he was discussing egg safety). It's especially bad when one takes the above point about Guantanamo Bay into consideration.


* After the breather episode on Chiitan, the show dived straight into Nightmare Fuel with the episode on lethal injections, and how executions in the US has become a matter of finding the least horrifying method of carrying them out. Some prisoners has even elected to be executed in the electric chair, instead of subjecting themselves to a lethal injection. This despite the lethal injection being developed as a humane alternative to electrocution.

to:

* After the breather episode on Chiitan, the show dived straight into Nightmare Fuel with the episode on lethal injections, and how executions in the US has become a matter of finding the least horrifying method of carrying them out. Some prisoners has have even elected to be executed in the electric chair, instead of subjecting themselves to a lethal injection. This despite the lethal injection being developed as a humane alternative to electrocution.

Added DiffLines:

* After the breather episode on Chiitan, the show dived straight into Nightmare Fuel with the episode on lethal injections, and how executions in the US has become a matter of finding the least horrifying method of carrying them out. Some prisoners has even elected to be executed in the electric chair, instead of subjecting themselves to a lethal injection. This despite the lethal injection being developed as a humane alternative to electrocution.


* As bad as Trump is, Brazilian candidate (and, as of January 1st, ''president'') UsefulNotes/JairBolsonaro is ''even worse'' - in addition to being hideously racist,[[note]]He's called refugees arriving in Brazil "the scum of the world"[[/note]] sexist,[note]]Saying he wouldn't rape a female MP ''because she isn't worth it''[[/note]] and homophobic,[[note]]Advocating parents ''whip'' their kids if they're gay and accusing adult gays of trying to "recruit" children[[/note]] the man is a bona fide fascist, proudly advocating torture and defending the UsefulNotes/BrazilianMilitaryRegime, saying their (along with UsefulNotes/AugustoPinochet, which the show didn't mention) only mistake was ''not killing enough people''. It is also apparent that there is something ''not quite right'' in Bolsonaro's head - when Creator/EllenPage asked him in an interview if he thought [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder her parents should have beaten her to make her not gay]], Bolsonaro responded by ''calling her pretty and saying he'd wolf-whistle at her if he was still in the army and saw her on the street''. '''''Think''''' about what is going on in someone's head to make them think that kind of response is acceptable for that kind of question.

to:

* As bad as Trump is, Brazilian candidate (and, as of January 1st, ''president'') UsefulNotes/JairBolsonaro is ''even worse'' - in addition to being hideously racist,[[note]]He's called refugees arriving in Brazil "the scum of the world"[[/note]] sexist,[note]]Saying sexist,[[note]]Saying he wouldn't rape a female MP ''because she isn't worth it''[[/note]] and homophobic,[[note]]Advocating parents ''whip'' their kids if they're gay and accusing adult gays of trying to "recruit" children[[/note]] the man is a bona fide fascist, proudly advocating torture and defending the UsefulNotes/BrazilianMilitaryRegime, saying their (along with UsefulNotes/AugustoPinochet, which the show didn't mention) only mistake was ''not killing enough people''. It is also apparent that there is something ''not quite right'' in Bolsonaro's head - when Creator/EllenPage asked him in an interview if he thought [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder her parents should have beaten her to make her not gay]], Bolsonaro responded by ''calling her pretty and saying he'd wolf-whistle at her if he was still in the army and saw her on the street''. '''''Think''''' about what is going on in someone's head to make them think that kind of response is acceptable for that kind of question.


* As bad as Trump is, Brazilian candidate (and, as of January 1st, ''president'') Jair Bolsonaro is ''even worse'' - in addition to being hideously racist[[note]]He's called refugees arriving in Brazil "the scum of the world"[[/note]], sexist[[note]]Saying he wouldn't rape a female MP ''because she isn't worth it''[[/note]], and homophobic[[note]]Advocating parents ''whip'' their kids if they're gay and accusing adult gays of trying to "recruit" children[[/note]], the man is a bona fide fascist, proudly advocating torture and defending the UsefulNotes/BrazilianMilitaryRegime, saying their (along with UsefulNotes/AugustoPinochet, which the show didn't mention) only mistake was ''not killing enough people''. It is also apparent that there is something ''not quite right'' in Bolsonaro's head - when Creator/EllenPage asked him in an interview if he thought [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder her parents should have beaten her to make her not gay]], Bolsonaro responded by ''calling her pretty and saying he'd wolf-whistle at her if he was still in the army and saw her on the street''. '''''Think''''' about what is going on in someone's head to make them think that kind of response is acceptable for that kind of question.

to:

* As bad as Trump is, Brazilian candidate (and, as of January 1st, ''president'') Jair Bolsonaro UsefulNotes/JairBolsonaro is ''even worse'' - in addition to being hideously racist[[note]]He's racist,[[note]]He's called refugees arriving in Brazil "the scum of the world"[[/note]], sexist[[note]]Saying world"[[/note]] sexist,[note]]Saying he wouldn't rape a female MP ''because she isn't worth it''[[/note]], it''[[/note]] and homophobic[[note]]Advocating homophobic,[[note]]Advocating parents ''whip'' their kids if they're gay and accusing adult gays of trying to "recruit" children[[/note]], children[[/note]] the man is a bona fide fascist, proudly advocating torture and defending the UsefulNotes/BrazilianMilitaryRegime, saying their (along with UsefulNotes/AugustoPinochet, which the show didn't mention) only mistake was ''not killing enough people''. It is also apparent that there is something ''not quite right'' in Bolsonaro's head - when Creator/EllenPage asked him in an interview if he thought [[RhetoricalQuestionBlunder her parents should have beaten her to make her not gay]], Bolsonaro responded by ''calling her pretty and saying he'd wolf-whistle at her if he was still in the army and saw her on the street''. '''''Think''''' about what is going on in someone's head to make them think that kind of response is acceptable for that kind of question.



** Another example is of a guy who received a robocall and decided to mess around with it by trying to get the caller to tell him that she is not a robot, [[FalseReassurance which she keeps refuting by constantly stating "I am a live person" and laughing monotonously.]] It's especially eerie that robocalls are scripted to deny that they're robots.

to:

** Another example is of a guy who received a robocall and decided to mess around with it by trying to get the caller to tell him that she is not a robot, [[FalseReassurance which she keeps refuting by constantly stating (only slight variations of) "I am a live person" and laughing monotonously.]] It's especially eerie that robocalls are scripted to deny that they're robots.


* A minor example compared to the rest of them, but even robocalls have some elements. While we mostly view them as nuisances to get rid of, many times they make people fall prey to scammers with calls of lawsuits and arrest warrants, or even taking advantage of things such as late payments to persist their calls, such as with one woman who was late with mortgage once and getting bombarded by harassing robocalls. Not to mention spoofing, where robocalls can easily trick you into answering their calls by calling from the guise of specific organizations or even people you know, as was demonstrated by Susan Collins and one of her staff members, and Jeff Rosen with a cybersecurity expert who called Rosen's mother from Rosen's phone and tricked her into giving out her social security number. Not helping was the fact that even Ajit Pai, the ''chairman of the FCC'' fell for a robocall in the middle of giving a speech about fighting them.
** Another example is of a guy who received a robocall and decided to mess around with it by trying to get the caller to tell him that she is not a robot, [[FalseReassurance which she keeps refuting by constantly stating "I am a live person" and laughing monotonously.]] It's especially eerie that robocalls are scripted to deny that they are indeed "live people".

to:

* A minor example compared Even ''robocalls'', something that we consider to the rest of them, but even robocalls just be a nuisance that we want to get rid of, have some elements. element of nightmare fuel. While we mostly view them as nuisances to get rid of, many times they make can be pretty ominous, potentially making more gullible people fall prey to scammers with calls of lawsuits and arrest warrants, or even taking advantage of things such as late payments to persist their calls, such as with one woman who was late with her mortgage once and getting got bombarded by with harassing robocalls. Not to mention spoofing, where robocalls can easily trick you into answering their calls by calling from the guise of specific organizations or even people you know, as was demonstrated by Susan Collins and one of her staff members, and Jeff Rosen with a cybersecurity expert who called Rosen's mother from Rosen's phone and tricked her into giving out her social security number. Not helping was the fact that even Ajit Pai, the ''chairman of the FCC'' fell for a robocall in the middle of giving a speech about fighting them.
** Another example is of a guy who received a robocall and decided to mess around with it by trying to get the caller to tell him that she is not a robot, [[FalseReassurance which she keeps refuting by constantly stating "I am a live person" and laughing monotonously.]] It's especially eerie that robocalls are scripted to deny that they are indeed "live people".they're robots.

Showing 15 edit(s) of 96

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report