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* CaptainObvious: Apparently, there's gonna be a jailbreak somewhere in this town. This troper's money is on the jail.


* LoopingLines: According to co-producer Tony Visconti, 75% of ''Live and Dangerous'' isn't really live, because the band was usually at least a bit drunk on stage and the shortage of coherent recorded performances meant that they had to record it live in the studio and add crowd noise later. The band's manager Chris O'Donnell disputes this, saying that while some parts (mostly guitar solos) got looped in the studio, it's 75% live. Guitarist Brian Robertson insists that the whole thing is live, and that overdubs would have been impossible because of the lack of acoustic separation.[[note]]When a band records live, chances are that any given mic will record more than just the source it's supposed to record. If a part is played badly or contains obvious clams, it will therefore be potentially audible on more than one track. Overdubbing that part won't work, because the original part will be audible in the background of other tracks. The only solution is either acoustic separation, in which each track contains only the instrument or voice it's supposed to contain and which is impossible to achieve in a live recording, or else re-recording the whole performance.[[/note]] Some of the soundboard recordings for what would become the album are available on YouTube, and indicate that the truth is somewhere in between Visconti's and Robertson's assertions. The only thing everyone agrees on is that it's one of the band's best albums.

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* LoopingLines: According to co-producer Tony Visconti, 75% of ''Live and Dangerous'' isn't really live, because the band was usually at least a bit drunk on stage and the shortage of coherent recorded performances meant that they had to record it live in the studio and add crowd noise later. The band's manager Chris O'Donnell disputes this, saying that while some parts (mostly guitar solos) got looped in the studio, it's 75% live. Guitarist Brian Robertson insists that the whole thing is live, and that overdubs would have been impossible because of the lack of acoustic separation.[[note]]When a band records live, chances are that any given mic will record more than just the source it's supposed to record. If a part is played badly or contains obvious clams, it will therefore be potentially audible on more than one track. Overdubbing that part won't work, because the original part will be audible in the background of other tracks. The only solution is either acoustic separation, in which each track contains only the instrument or voice it's supposed to contain and which is impossible to achieve in a live recording, or else re-recording the whole performance.[[/note]] Some of the soundboard recordings for what would become the album are available on YouTube, [=YouTube=], and indicate that the truth is somewhere in between Visconti's and Robertson's assertions. The only thing everyone agrees on is that it's one of the band's best albums.


* {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Musically as opposed to personally, Scott Gorham. His guitar style, especially when soloing, is very strange, being almost devoid of the usual clichés, and relies on imagination and quirky phrasing rather than speed. This is why he was usually not the star guitarist in the band, but also why he was more essential than those who were; he was also, after founders Lynott and Downey, its third-longest-serving member.

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* {{Cloudcuckoolander}}: Musically as opposed to personally, Scott Gorham. His guitar style, especially when soloing, is very strange, being almost devoid of the usual clichés, and relies on imagination and quirky phrasing rather than speed. This is why he was usually not the star guitarist in the band, but also why he was more essential than those who were; he was also, after founders Lynott and Downey, its third-longest-serving member. Robertson commented that when he and Gorham joined, he was stunned by the oddness of Gorham's guitar style, which was in part a result of how recently he had started playing (he'd originally been a bassist), and that the reason why minor-key songs such as "Sha-La-La" have major key solos is due to the fact that Gorham, at the time, had difficulties taking solos in minor keys.



* GreatestHitsAlbum: Hardly a year goes by when a new one of these doesn't get released. Sometimes if you're lucky, you'll get one with rare b-sides or unused tracks (such as the "Vagabonds Kings Warriors Angels box set).

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* GreatestHitsAlbum: Hardly a year goes by when a new one of these doesn't get released. Sometimes if you're lucky, you'll get one with rare b-sides or unused tracks (such as the "Vagabonds ''Vagabonds Kings Warriors Angels Angels'' box set).



* LoopingLines: According to co-producer Tony Visconti, 75% of ''Live and Dangerous'' isn't really live, because the band was usually at least a bit drunk on stage and the shortage of coherent recorded performances meant that they had to record it live in the studio and add crowd noise later. The band's manager Chris O'Donnell disputes this, saying that while some parts (mostly guitar solos) got looped in the studio, it's 75% live. Guitarist Brian Robertson insists that the whole thing is live, and that overdubs would have been impossible because of the lack of acoustic separation.[[note]]When a band records live, chances are that any given mic will record more than just the source it's supposed to record. If a part is played badly or contains obvious clams, it will therefore be potentially audible on more than one track. Overdubbing that part won't work, because the original part will be audible in the background of other tracks. The only solution is either acoustic separation, in which each track contains only the instrument or voice it's supposed to contain and which is impossible to achieve in a live recording, or else re-recording the whole performance.[[/note]] The only thing everyone agrees on is that it's one of the band's best albums.

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* LoopingLines: According to co-producer Tony Visconti, 75% of ''Live and Dangerous'' isn't really live, because the band was usually at least a bit drunk on stage and the shortage of coherent recorded performances meant that they had to record it live in the studio and add crowd noise later. The band's manager Chris O'Donnell disputes this, saying that while some parts (mostly guitar solos) got looped in the studio, it's 75% live. Guitarist Brian Robertson insists that the whole thing is live, and that overdubs would have been impossible because of the lack of acoustic separation.[[note]]When a band records live, chances are that any given mic will record more than just the source it's supposed to record. If a part is played badly or contains obvious clams, it will therefore be potentially audible on more than one track. Overdubbing that part won't work, because the original part will be audible in the background of other tracks. The only solution is either acoustic separation, in which each track contains only the instrument or voice it's supposed to contain and which is impossible to achieve in a live recording, or else re-recording the whole performance.[[/note]] Some of the soundboard recordings for what would become the album are available on YouTube, and indicate that the truth is somewhere in between Visconti's and Robertson's assertions. The only thing everyone agrees on is that it's one of the band's best albums.



* MyspeldRokband: In a sense. It's a pun on "Tin Lizzie", the Ford Model T, but with "tin" misspelled as "thin", a joke on how Dubliners would pronounce "thin" as "tin".
* NewSoundAlbum: The most significant of these was ''Fighting'' as it signalled the beginning of their most well-regarded period.

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* MyspeldRokband: In a sense. It's a pun on "Tin Lizzie", a robot character from the Ford Model T, British comic the Dandy, but with "tin" misspelled as "thin", a joke on how Dubliners would pronounce "thin" as "tin".
* NewSoundAlbum: The most significant of these was ''Fighting'' ''Fighting'', despite actually being the second album recorded by the classic lineup, as it signalled the beginning of their most well-regarded period.



* ParentalLoveSong: "Philomena", Phil's song about how much he loves his mom.

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* ParentalLoveSong: "Philomena", Phil's song about how much he loves his mom. He also sings it in an exagerrated Irish accent as a reference to his and his mother's homeland.



* RockStarSong: apart from the satirical "The Rocker", there is also "Rocky".

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* RockStarSong: apart from the satirical "The Rocker", there is also "Rocky"."Rocky," which is about Robertson ("cocky Rocky the rock and roll star").



**In live performances, the band finished "Rosalie" with a reprise (or prequel, since it often came first in the set list) of the middle of "Cowboy Song," now called "Cowgirl's Song."



* SongOfSongTitles: The sub-titles of the mini-epic "Roisin Dubh: Black Rose (A Rock Legend)" reference the original Irish/Scottish/English folk melodies the track contains.[[note]]Well, kind of. The track listing gives the tunes as "Shenandoah", "Will You Go Lassie Go", "Danny Boy" and "The Mason's Apron". What they actually play is slightly different. The band plays, and Phil sings, most of the first verse of "Shenandoah", followed by a line from "Go Lassie Go", then the twin guitars play a soaring instrumental version of the second half of the verse of "Danny Boy". The first of the really fast guitar part is not, by any stretch of the imagination, "The Mason's Apron". The second half of it is one of the best-known reels in Irish traditional music, "Rakish Paddy".[[/note]]

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* SongOfSongTitles: The sub-titles of the mini-epic "Roisin Dubh: Black Rose (A Rock Legend)" reference the original Irish/Scottish/English folk melodies the track contains.[[note]]Well, contains. Well, kind of. The track listing gives the tunes as "Shenandoah", "Shenandoah" (actually an American folk song), "Will You Go Lassie Go", Go" (of Scottish origin), "Danny Boy" and "The Mason's Apron". What they actually play is slightly different. The band plays, and Phil sings, most of the first verse of "Shenandoah", followed by a line from "Go Lassie Go", then the twin guitars play a soaring instrumental version of the second half of the verse of "Danny Boy". The first of the really fast guitar part is not, by any stretch of the imagination, "The Mason's Apron". The second half of it is one of the best-known reels in Irish traditional music, "Rakish Paddy".[[/note]]



** Towards the end of their existence, the band briefly featured Midge Ure, first on guitar, then later on keyboards. He played with the band live, as well as played on and co-wrote a handful of recordings. He would soon after join Ultravox as their new vocalist (including their biggest hit Vienna) and also co-organised Live Aid with Bob Geldof- to which Thin Lizzy weren't invited, much to Lynotts disappointment.

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** Towards the end of their existence, the band briefly featured Midge Ure, first on guitar, then later on keyboards. He played with the band live, as well as played on and co-wrote a handful of recordings. He would soon after join Ultravox as their new vocalist (including their biggest hit Vienna) and also co-organised Live Aid with Bob Geldof- to which Thin Lizzy weren't invited, much to Lynotts Lynott's disappointment.

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* SiameseTwinSongs: Many live performances of "Cowboy Song" (such as the one on "Live & Dangerous") segue directly into "The Boys Are Back In Town" via its last power chord. Similarly, the performance of "Warriors" on "Life" segues directly into "Are You Ready".


* ChristmasRushed: According to then-guitarist Eric Bell, the label initially denied them making a second LP, then gave them three weeks in which to make one - "Shades Of A Blue Orphanage". Having used up several of the best potential songs on their EP "New Day" (which was made due to the label's initial refusal to let them record a second LP), the group had very few new songs at the time and padded the album out with some hastily put together filler and a couple of early songs, not to mention sounding exhausted. There were no singles released from it. The group fortunately had a hit a few months later with "Whisky In The Jar" which allowed them to negotiate a lot more time to make the much more popular "Vagabonds Of The Western World".



* ConceptAlbum: ''Jailbreak'' and ''Johnny the Fox'' were born of failed attempts at this.

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* ConceptAlbum: ''Jailbreak'' and ''Johnny the Fox'' were born of failed attempts at this.

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* TheSomethingSong: "Cowboy Song"

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* TheBusCameBack: "The Boys are Back in Town" is about a group of friends returning to their hometown after being away for many years.

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* RevolvingDoorBand: The group has thus far gone through 21 members, most of them guitarists and occasionally keyboardists. Nowadays, it's also reached TheseusShipParadox levels, as neither Lynott nor Downey (the two stable members during their heyday) are in the band anymore.


* LongSongShortScene: The majority of Thin Lizzy's material just doesn't get the widespread exposure it deserves. Also, two parts of "Dancing in the Moonlight" were mercilessly spliced together for a cider advert.
** "Sha La La" is usually considered to have been wasted as a ''Nightlife'' album track. Had the band released it as a single it might have been a hit. Luckily a live version would appear on Live And Dangerous, a live album which is considered one of the best ever.

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* LongSongShortScene: The majority of Thin Lizzy's material just doesn't get the widespread exposure it deserves. Also, two Two parts of "Dancing in the Moonlight" were mercilessly spliced together for a cider advert.
** "Sha La La" is usually considered to have been wasted as a ''Nightlife'' album track. Had the band released it as a single it might have been a hit. Luckily a live version would appear on Live And Dangerous, a live album which is considered one of the best ever.
advert.


* AirGuitar: Thin Lizzy are just too damn riffilicious, and those guitar harmonies and the guitar "duels" are top-notch.


* SubvertedRhymeEveryOccasion: averted - Lynott was a master at rhyming lyrics.

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* LastNoteNightmare: The end of "Heart Attack", which is the last song on their last album, is Phil Lynott saying the song title while being accompanied by the last couple of power chords. Not really all that scary, but it's pretty damn eerie when one takes into account that this was basically the band's swan song and Lynott would die from heart failure just under three years later.


When he joined the band in 1974, the original guitarist Eric Bell had been and gone, recording the hit single "Whiskey in the Jar", Thin Lizzy's first major success. Joining Scott in the other guitar role was Glaswiegan Brian Robertson, a hot-headed Scottish guitar prodigy, and between them they developed the ground-breaking distinctive twin lead guitar attack which characterizes Thin Lizzy's sound.

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When he joined the band in 1974, the original guitarist Eric Bell had been and gone, recording the hit single "Whiskey in the Jar", Thin Lizzy's first major success. Joining Scott in the other guitar role was Glaswiegan Glaswegian Brian Robertson, a hot-headed Scottish guitar prodigy, and between them they developed the ground-breaking distinctive twin lead guitar attack which characterizes Thin Lizzy's sound.

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* RearrangeTheSong: The group wrote a blues song called "Suicide" in the Eric Bell era, between their second and third albums, Shades Of A Blue Orphanage and Vagabonds Of The Western World. Aside from a few radio sessions and live recordings from 1972-1973, the band seemed to have all given up on the song. However, during the Fighting sessions in 1975, the song was resurrected, and Scott Gorham and Brian Robertson came up with a new, galloping bridge that was deemed so good the song made it onto the album.

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** "Killer on the Loose" contains the line "Standing in the shadows of love", which was a 1966 hit for The Four Tops.

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