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[[caption-width-right:350:The most famous lineup as seen in 1986. From left to right: Richard Sterban, Joe Bonsall, William Lee Golden, and Duane Allen.]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:The most famous lineup as seen in 1986. From left to right: Richard Sterban, Sterban (bass), Joe Bonsall, Bonsall (tenor), William Lee Golden, Golden (baritone), and Duane Allen.Allen (lead).]]



In the 1960s and into the early 1970s, the band achieved some notability in the gospel field, and even won a Grammy. By 1973, Joe Bonsall had taken over on tenor vocals and Richard Sterban on bass vocals, thus forming the most popular and well-known lineup of Allen (lead), Bonsall (tenor), Golden (baritone), and Sterban (bass). After a few false starts, including a guest appearance on a low-charting Music/JohnnyCash single and a few dud releases on Creator/ColumbiaRecords, the Oaks broke through in 1977 with the Top Ten hit "Y'all Come Back Saloon". From then until the late 1980s, they would remain a constant fixture on the country charts. "Elvira" and "Bobbie Sue" netted the group a couple crossover pop hits. Golden was fired in 1987, with Steve Sanders taking his place; Golden returned in December 1995, ironically after Sanders was ousted.

to:

In the 1960s and into the early 1970s, the band achieved some notability in the gospel field, and even won a Grammy. By 1973, Joe Bonsall had taken over on tenor vocals and Richard Sterban on bass vocals, thus forming the most popular and well-known lineup of Allen (lead), Bonsall (tenor), Golden (baritone), and Sterban (bass). After a few false starts, including a guest appearance on a low-charting Music/JohnnyCash single and a few dud releases on Creator/ColumbiaRecords, the Oaks broke through in 1977 with the Top Ten hit "Y'all Come Back Saloon". From then until the late 1980s, they would remain a constant fixture on the country charts. "Elvira" and "Bobbie Sue" netted the group a couple crossover pop hits. Golden was fired in 1987, 1987 and replaced with Steve Sanders taking his place; Sanders, who remained until 1995 when Golden returned in December 1995, ironically after Sanders was ousted.
allowed to return.



* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: To anyone who knows only the most famous lineup and mainstream country-gospel sound, their fully gospel albums from the early incarnations can be quite the weird listen. Also, in a visual example, William Lee Golden didn't start growing his beard out until after ''Bobbie Sue''.

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: To anyone who knows only the most famous lineup and mainstream country-gospel country sound, their fully gospel albums from the early incarnations can be quite the weird listen. Also, in a visual example, William Lee Golden didn't start growing his beard out until after ''Bobbie Sue''.

Added DiffLines:

* AwardBaitSong: "Dream On" and "Thank God for Kids", while they were big Country chart hits, have arrangements that owe more to this style than to any familiar Nashville sounds, complete with gentle openings that eventually lead to big rousing choruses, plus sentimental lyrics.

Added DiffLines:

* RaginCajun: They had a big hit with their version of Rodney Crowell's "Leaving Louisiana in the Broad Daylight", about a young Cajun woman who runs off with a drifter, enraging her parents.


Due to the typical makeup of vocal groups (two tenors, a baritone, and a bass), their songs are sometimes confused with ones performed by Music/TheStatlerBrothers. Musically, however, the most well-known version of the Oak Ridge Boys was more of a contemporary country-pop group, and the distinction was even greater visually, as the the Oaks typically wore their regular clothes while the Statlers favored three-piece suits.

to:

Due to the typical makeup of vocal groups (two tenors, a (tenor, lead, baritone, and a bass), their songs are sometimes confused with ones performed by Music/TheStatlerBrothers. Musically, however, the most well-known version of the Oak Ridge Boys was more of a contemporary country-pop group, and the distinction was even greater visually, as the the Oaks typically wore their regular clothes while the Statlers favored three-piece suits.

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/oak_ridge_boys_1986_billboard_1548.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350:The most famous lineup as seen in 1986. From left to right: Richard Sterban, Joe Bonsall, William Lee Golden, and Duane Allen.]]

Added DiffLines:

Due to the typical makeup of vocal groups (two tenors, a baritone, and a bass), their songs are sometimes confused with ones performed by Music/TheStatlerBrothers. Musically, however, the most well-known version of the Oak Ridge Boys was more of a contemporary country-pop group, and the distinction was even greater visually, as the the Oaks typically wore their regular clothes while the Statlers favored three-piece suits.


* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: Some of the tracks on ''Step On Out'' have an unusually synth-driven sound, most notably "Come On In (You Did the Bset You Could Do)"[[note]]not to be confused with their earlier "Come On In"[[/note]] and "Little Things".

to:

* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: Some of the tracks on ''Step On Out'' have an unusually synth-driven sound, most notably "Come On In (You Did the Bset Best That You Could Do)"[[note]]not to be confused with their earlier "Come On In"[[/note]] and "Little Things".


In the 1960s and into the early 1970s, the band achieved some notability in the gospel field, and even won a Grammy. By 1973, Joe Bonsall had taken over on tenor vocals and Richard Sterban on bass vocals, thus forming the most popular and well-known lineup. After a few false starts, including a guest appearance on a low-charting Music/JohnnyCash single and a few dud releases on Creator/ColumbiaRecords, the Oaks broke through in 1977 with the Top Ten hit "Y'all Come Back Saloon". From then until the late 1980s, they would remain a constant fixture on the country charts. "Elvira" and "Bobbie Sue" netted the group a couple crossover pop hits. Golden was fired in 1987, with Steve Sanders taking his place; Golden returned in December 1995, ironically after Sanders was ousted.

to:

In the 1960s and into the early 1970s, the band achieved some notability in the gospel field, and even won a Grammy. By 1973, Joe Bonsall had taken over on tenor vocals and Richard Sterban on bass vocals, thus forming the most popular and well-known lineup.lineup of Allen (lead), Bonsall (tenor), Golden (baritone), and Sterban (bass). After a few false starts, including a guest appearance on a low-charting Music/JohnnyCash single and a few dud releases on Creator/ColumbiaRecords, the Oaks broke through in 1977 with the Top Ten hit "Y'all Come Back Saloon". From then until the late 1980s, they would remain a constant fixture on the country charts. "Elvira" and "Bobbie Sue" netted the group a couple crossover pop hits. Golden was fired in 1987, with Steve Sanders taking his place; Golden returned in December 1995, ironically after Sanders was ousted.



* SubduedSection: The next-to-last chorus of "Come On In (You Did the Best You Could Do)" is ACappella.

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* SubduedSection: The next-to-last penultimate chorus of "Come On In (You Did the Best You Could Do)" is ACappella.



** In one of the most notable examples, Joe and Richard alternate on "Elvira" (Joe does most of the song, Richard does the "oom papa mow mow"s).

to:

** In one of the most notable examples, Joe and Richard alternate on "Elvira" (Joe does sings most of "Elvira", with Sterban contributing the song, Richard does the iconic "oom papa mow mow"s).mow" part.


** Although that is the name of an actual river that flows through Pittsburgh (along with the Ohio, which is also name dropped).



* VocalTagTeam: Although Allen is the ''de facto'' lead singer, the band hasn't shied from releasing cuts on which the other members sing lead. Among the more prominent examples:

to:

* VocalTagTeam: Although Allen is the ''de facto'' lead singer, the band hasn't shied from releasing cuts on which the other members sing lead. Among the more prominent examples:some of their bigger hits:



** In one of the most notable examples, Joe sang lead on "Elvira".

to:

** In one of the most notable examples, Joe sang lead and Richard alternate on "Elvira"."Elvira" (Joe does most of the song, Richard does the "oom papa mow mow"s).


* SomethingCompletelyDifferent: Some of the tracks on ''Step On Out'' have an unusually synth-driven sound, most notably "Come On In (You Did the Bset You Could Do)"[[note]]not to be confused with their earlier "Come On In"[[/note]] and "Little Things".



* SubduedSection: The next-to-last chorus of "Come On In (You Did the Best You Could Do)" is {{a cappella}}.

to:

* SubduedSection: The next-to-last chorus of "Come On In (You Did the Best You Could Do)" is {{a cappella}}.ACappella.

Added DiffLines:

** Although that is the name of an actual river that flows through Pittsburgh (along with the Ohio, which is also name dropped).

Added DiffLines:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: To anyone who knows only the most famous lineup and mainstream country-gospel sound, their fully gospel albums from the early incarnations can be quite the weird listen. Also, in a visual example, William Lee Golden didn't start growing his beard out until after ''Bobbie Sue''.


** Bonsall sings "Elvira".
** William sings "Trying to Love Two Women" and "Thank God for Kids".
** Richard sings "Dream On".

to:

** Bonsall sings In one of the most notable examples, Joe sang lead on "Elvira".
** William sings sang "Trying to Love Two Women" and "Thank God for Kids".
** Richard sings sang "Dream On".


* DeadSparks: "Lucky Moon" has the narrator realizing through an eavesdropped phone conversation that his wife is unsatisfied, and as a result, he pleads for one more chance.



* ItWillNeverCatchOn: Duane Allen, according to ''Radio/AmericanCountryCountdown'', didn't think that "I'll Be True to You" would be successful due to the song having a DownerEnding. It wound up being their first #1 hit.

to:

* ItWillNeverCatchOn: Duane Allen, according to ''Radio/AmericanCountryCountdown'', Allen said in an interview with ''Radio/AmericanCountryCountdown'' that he didn't think that "I'll Be True to You" would be successful due to the song having a DownerEnding. It wound up being their first #1 hit.



** Their cover of "Elvira" with a cappella group Home Free has Bonsall, Allen, and Sterban sharing the lead with three of the latter's five members. Home Free bass vocalist Tim Foust also alternates with Sterban on the "oom papa mow mow"s.

to:

** Their cover of "Elvira" with a cappella ACappella group Home Free has Bonsall, Allen, and Sterban sharing the lead with three of the latter's five members. Home Free bass vocalist Tim Foust also alternates with Sterban on the "oom papa mow mow"s.


In the 1960s and into the early 1970s, the band achieved some notability in the gospel field, and even won a Grammy. By 1973, Joe Bonsall had taken over on tenor vocals and Richard Sterban on bass, thus forming the most popular and well-known lineup. After a few false starts, including a guest appearance on a low-charting Music/JohnnyCash single and a few dud releases on Creator/ColumbiaRecords, the Oaks broke through in 1977 with the Top Ten hit "Y'all Come Back Saloon". From then until the late 1980s, they would remain a constant fixture on the country charts. "Elvira" and "Bobbie Sue" netted the group a couple crossover pop hits. Golden was fired in 1987, with Steve Sanders taking his place; Golden returned in December 1995, ironically after Sanders was ousted.

to:

In the 1960s and into the early 1970s, the band achieved some notability in the gospel field, and even won a Grammy. By 1973, Joe Bonsall had taken over on tenor vocals and Richard Sterban on bass, bass vocals, thus forming the most popular and well-known lineup. After a few false starts, including a guest appearance on a low-charting Music/JohnnyCash single and a few dud releases on Creator/ColumbiaRecords, the Oaks broke through in 1977 with the Top Ten hit "Y'all Come Back Saloon". From then until the late 1980s, they would remain a constant fixture on the country charts. "Elvira" and "Bobbie Sue" netted the group a couple crossover pop hits. Golden was fired in 1987, with Steve Sanders taking his place; Golden returned in December 1995, ironically after Sanders was ousted.



* BassoProfundo: Richard Sterban has an impressively deep voice. The famous "oom papa mow mow"s on "Elvira" go as low as C2, but he has gone even lower -- "Trying to Love Two Women" has him hit F1 at the end, and he is recorded as having gone as low as E♭1.

to:

* BassoProfundo: Richard Sterban has an impressively deep voice. The famous "oom papa mow mow"s on "Elvira" go as low as C2, but he has gone even lower -- lower: he hits an F1 at the end of "Trying to Love Two Women" has him hit F1 at the end, Women", and he is recorded confirmed as having gone as low as E♭1.

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