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After Garcia’s death and the Dead’s disbandment, a band from Vermont called Music/{{Phish}}, which had existed for about ten years and had already started to become popular with college crowds, became [[SpiritualSuccessor the de facto jam band for people to follow]]. Although Phish were heavily influenced by the Dead, the two bands sound very different, as fans of either will point out. While both were primarily psychedelic rock bands, the Dead were heavily influenced by blues, R&B, folk and country, while Phish found their influences in styles like funk, jazz fusion, prog rock and alternative rock, all genres that the Dead rarely or never touched during their career.[[note]]The lengthiest exception on the jazz and prog counts occurred during the Godchaux years; Keith brought in a strong jazz influence, and the Dead performed several lengthy, complicated, multi-part compositions during this period, such as "Blues for Allah", "Terrapin Station", and "Help on the Way"/"Slipknot!"/"Franklin's Tower", that are sometimes considered to at least border on prog rock, if not to fall within the genre entirely. ''Anthem of the Sun'', from the brief period where Constanten was the band's [[TheSixthRanger Seventh Ranger]] as a second keyboardist, is the other Dead album you'll occasionally hear cited as an example of prog, and on the jazz count, they did collaborate with key jazz figures on occasion, with probably the most celebrated example being saxophonist Branford Marsalis during a 1990 concert that was later released as ''Wake Up to Find Out''. However, the Dead rarely, if ever, featured much funk influence, and alternative rock mostly came to prominence during their final years.[[/note]]

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After Garcia’s death and the Dead’s disbandment, a band from Vermont called Music/{{Phish}}, which had existed for about ten years and had already started to become popular with college crowds, became [[SpiritualSuccessor the de facto jam band for people to follow]]. Although Phish were heavily influenced by the Dead, the two bands sound very different, as fans of either will point out. While both were primarily psychedelic rock bands, the Dead Phish were also heavily influenced by blues, R&B, folk British prog-rock bands and country, while Phish found their influences in styles like funk, jazz fusion, prog rock and alternative rock, all genres that the Dead rarely or never touched during their career.[[note]]The lengthiest exception on the jazz and prog counts occurred during the Godchaux years; Keith brought in a strong jazz influence, and the Dead performed several lengthy, complicated, multi-part compositions during this period, such as "Blues for Allah", "Terrapin Station", and "Help on the Way"/"Slipknot!"/"Franklin's Tower", that are sometimes considered to at least border on prog rock, if not to fall within the genre entirely. ''Anthem of the Sun'', from the brief period where Constanten was the band's [[TheSixthRanger Seventh Ranger]] as a second keyboardist, is the other Dead album you'll occasionally hear cited as an example of prog, and on the jazz count, they did collaborate with key jazz figures on occasion, with probably the most celebrated example being saxophonist Branford Marsalis during a 1990 concert that was later released as ''Wake Up to Find Out''. However, the Dead rarely, if ever, featured much funk influence, and alternative rock mostly came to prominence during their final years.[[/note]]
Music/FrankZappa.


->''"Our audience is like people who like licorice. Not everybody likes licorice, but the people who like licorice ''really'' like licorice.”"''

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->''"Our audience is like people who like licorice. Not everybody likes licorice, but the people who like licorice ''really'' like licorice.”"''"''

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->''"Our audience is like people who like licorice. Not everybody likes licorice, but the people who like licorice ''really'' like licorice.”"''
-->-- '''Jerry Garcia'''


* AwesomeButImpractical: A lot of the band's business decisions were this, but the kicker is easily the "Wall of Sound" PA system they had in 1974. Designed by longtime sound engineer Owsley Stanley, the Wall was a sixty foot stack of speakers, with each instrument having its own channel (and in the case of Lesh's bass and Kreutzmann's drums, separate channels for different parts of the instrument) and with a particular focus on high quality sound. Unfortunately, the thing was a nightmare to take from show to show, and was retired when the band went on their touring hiatus.



* GriefSong: “Birdsong” (for Janis Joplin, later modified to be about Jerry in the Fare The Well shows), “Cassidy” (for Neal Cassidy, an early friend of the band), and “Box of Rain” (for Phil Lesh's terminally ill father)

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* GriefSong: “Birdsong” (for Janis Joplin, later modified to be about Jerry in the Fare The Well shows), “Cassidy” (for Neal Cassidy, an early friend of the band), and “Box of Rain” (for Phil Lesh's terminally ill father)



* TitledAfterTheSong: A fair chunk of their retrospective live albums after [[PlayingWithATrope key lyrics in their songs]]. For example, ''Wake Up to Find Out'' (their 3/29/1990 show) takes its title from "Eyes of the World," ''Get Shown the Light'' (their May 1977 tour collection) is from "Scarlet Begonias," and ''Believe If You Need It'' (various early '70s shows from the Pacific Northwest) is from "Box of Rain." There are some straighter examples as well, like ''So Many Roads,'' ''Truckin' Up to Buffalo,'' and ''Spring 1990 (The Other One)''.

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* TitledAfterTheSong: A fair chunk of their retrospective live albums after [[PlayingWithATrope key lyrics in their songs]].songs, but not the titles themselves]]. For example, ''Wake Up to Find Out'' (their 3/29/1990 show) takes its title from "Eyes of the World," ''Get Shown the Light'' (their May 1977 tour collection) is from "Scarlet Begonias," and ''Believe If You Need It'' (various early '70s shows from the Pacific Northwest) is from "Box of Rain." There are some straighter examples as well, like ''So Many Roads,'' ''Truckin' Up to Buffalo,'' and ''Spring 1990 (The Other One)''.

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* StrangeStage: They performed atop the Pyramids of Giza in 1978.


After Garcia’s death and the Dead’s disbandment, a band from Vermont called Music/{{Phish}}, which had existed for about ten years and had already started to become popular with college crowds, became [[SpiritualSuccessor the de facto jam band for people to follow]]. Although Phish were heavily influenced by the Dead, the two bands sound very different, as fans of either will point out. While both were primarily psychedelic rock bands, the Dead were heavily influenced by blues, R&B, folk and country, while Phish found their influences in styles like funk, jazz fusion, prog rock and alternative rock, all genres that the Dead rarely or never touched during their career.[[note]]The lengthiest exception on the jazz and prog counts occurred during the Godchaux years; Keith brought in a strong jazz influence, and the Dead performed several lengthy, complicated, multi-part compositions during this period, such as "Blues for Allah", "Terrapin Station", and "Help on the Way"/"Slipknot!"/"Franklin's Tower", that are sometimes considered to at least border on prog rock, if not to fall within the genre entirely. ''Anthem of the Sun'', from the brief period where Constanten was the band's [[SixthRanger Seventh Ranger]] as a second keyboardist, is the other Dead album you'll occasionally hear cited as an example of prog, and on the jazz count, they did collaborate with key jazz figures on occasion, with probably the most celebrated example being saxophonist Branford Marsalis during a 1990 concert that was later released as ''Wake Up to Find Out''. However, the Dead rarely, if ever, featured much funk influence, and alternative rock mostly came to prominence during their final years.[[/note]]

to:

After Garcia’s death and the Dead’s disbandment, a band from Vermont called Music/{{Phish}}, which had existed for about ten years and had already started to become popular with college crowds, became [[SpiritualSuccessor the de facto jam band for people to follow]]. Although Phish were heavily influenced by the Dead, the two bands sound very different, as fans of either will point out. While both were primarily psychedelic rock bands, the Dead were heavily influenced by blues, R&B, folk and country, while Phish found their influences in styles like funk, jazz fusion, prog rock and alternative rock, all genres that the Dead rarely or never touched during their career.[[note]]The lengthiest exception on the jazz and prog counts occurred during the Godchaux years; Keith brought in a strong jazz influence, and the Dead performed several lengthy, complicated, multi-part compositions during this period, such as "Blues for Allah", "Terrapin Station", and "Help on the Way"/"Slipknot!"/"Franklin's Tower", that are sometimes considered to at least border on prog rock, if not to fall within the genre entirely. ''Anthem of the Sun'', from the brief period where Constanten was the band's [[SixthRanger [[TheSixthRanger Seventh Ranger]] as a second keyboardist, is the other Dead album you'll occasionally hear cited as an example of prog, and on the jazz count, they did collaborate with key jazz figures on occasion, with probably the most celebrated example being saxophonist Branford Marsalis during a 1990 concert that was later released as ''Wake Up to Find Out''. However, the Dead rarely, if ever, featured much funk influence, and alternative rock mostly came to prominence during their final years.[[/note]]



* GrandFinale: The Fare Thee Well shows. Doubles a MilestoneCelebration, as it was a reunion in time for their fiftieth anniversary.

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* GrandFinale: The Fare Thee Well shows. Doubles a MilestoneCelebration, Milestone Celebration, as it was a reunion in time for their fiftieth anniversary.



* SixthRanger:

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* SixthRanger: TheSixthRanger:


* AscendedFanboy: The "how we joined" story Donna Jean Godchaux likes to tell is that both she and husband Keith were fans of the Dead since 1970, and wholeheartedly believed they would one day play with the band. Then the two went to a Jerry Garcia Band concert, and Donna approached him during intermission saying "I have your new keyboard player. I need your phone number." Garcia obliged, and Keith started rehearsals, and the rest is history.



* Creator/TheBeatGeneration: A major influence.



* CoverVersion: They had a gigantic repertoire of covers from a wide range of genres including folk, country, jazz, R&B, blues, classic rock, and many others. Around half their material in any given concert could be cover songs, and these often ranked amongst the band’s best loved material. They also CoveredUp the original artist on several occasions.

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* CoverVersion: They had a gigantic repertoire of covers from a wide range of genres including folk, country, jazz, R&B, blues, classic rock, and many others. Around half their material in any given concert could be cover songs, and these often ranked amongst the band’s best loved material. They also CoveredUp Covered Up the original artist on several occasions.



* DisproportionateRetribution: see OldShame for details. ''Steal Your Face'' was two disks totalling about 84 minutes of material. ''The Grateful Dead Movie'' Soundtrack was five disks, adding 300 more minutes of material from that era.

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* DisproportionateRetribution: see OldShame Old Shame for details. ''Steal Your Face'' was two disks totalling about 84 minutes of material. ''The Grateful Dead Movie'' Soundtrack was five disks, adding 300 more minutes of material from that era.


** The only member of the band ''not'' inducted as a band member also counts as a Sixth Ranger. Bruce Hornsby was the band’s keyboardist on-and-off during their last few years. Hornsby already had a successful career as frontman for the rock group Bruce Hornsby & The Range when he began playing with the Dead, and he spent most of the late 1980s and early 1990s balancing his time between the two groups. Despite his popularity with Deadheads, Hornsby never officially joined the Dead full-time, and Garcia considered him to be a floating member who could come and go as he pleased. However, he was selected as the band's induction presented for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony.

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** The only member of the band ''not'' inducted as a band member also counts as a Sixth Ranger. Bruce Hornsby was the band’s keyboardist on-and-off during their last few years. Hornsby already had a successful career as frontman for the rock group Bruce Hornsby & The Range when he began playing with the Dead, and he spent most of the late 1980s and early 1990s balancing his time between the two groups. Despite his popularity with Deadheads, Hornsby never officially joined the Dead full-time, and Garcia considered him to be a floating member who could come and go as he pleased. However, he was selected as the band's induction presented presenter for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony.

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* RevengeBallad: Their reworking of the classic song "Stagger Lee", in which the protagonist is forced into taking justice into her own hands.
-->As Stagger Lee lit a cigarette she shot him in the balls\\
Blew the smoke off her revolver, had him dragged to city hall\\
Bayo, Bayo, see you hang him high\\
He shot my Billy dead and now he's got to die.


** 2/11/1970 at Fillmore East had Music/TheAllmanBrothersBand and [[Music/FleetwoodMac Peter Green]] [[DreamTeam joining the Dead]] for one big jam.

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** 2/11/1970 at Fillmore East had Music/TheAllmanBrothersBand [[Music/TheAllmanBrothersBand Gregg and Duane Allman, Butch Trucks, Berry Oakley,]] [[Music/FleetwoodMac Peter Green]] Green, Danny Kirwan, and Mick Fleetwood]] [[DreamTeam joining the Dead]] for one big jam.the Dark Star medley.


* EpicRocking: Most of their songs are epic jams of several minutes in length; in concert, the group often strung several songs together into a single jam that could run an hour in length or more. A particularly celebrated example is the threesome of “Dark Star”, “That’s It for the Other One”, and “Turn On Your Love Light” from the band’s Fillmore East show on February 13, 1970 - they are a continuous ninety-minute performance with no gaps between the songs, each of which is thirty minutes long by itself. This show is considered one of the Dead’s best live shows ever, and these three songs are the main reason. (These three tracks are available on ''Dick’s Picks, Vol. 4'', though it doesn’t include the whole show.) Their longest studio track is probably “Terrapin Station Part 1”, which runs for 16:23.

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* EpicRocking: Most of their songs are epic jams of several minutes in length; in concert, the group often strung several songs together into a single jam that could run an hour in length or more.
**
A particularly celebrated example is the threesome of “Dark Star”, “That’s It for the Other One”, and “Turn On Your Love Light” from the band’s Fillmore East show on February 13, 1970 - they are a continuous ninety-minute performance with no gaps between the songs, each of which is thirty minutes long by itself. This show is considered one of the Dead’s best live shows ever, and these three songs are the main reason. (These three tracks are available on ''Dick’s Picks, Vol. 4'', though it doesn’t include the whole show.) Their longest )
** By contrast, their
studio track work doesn't play this straight often (outside of Music/{{Anthem|OfTheSun}}); the average studio length is probably about 3-5 minutes, which is not particularly long by rock band standards. That said, there are some exceptions: "Viola Lee Blues" is 10:01, "What's Become of the Baby" is 8:12, "Candyman," is 6:14, and “Terrapin Station Part 1”, which their longest studio effort, runs for 16:23.16:23.
** The early '70s are commonly nicknamed their "space jazz" era because this was when they took their tendencies for this even further: this era has the longest versions of "Dark Star" (5/11/1972, at 47:11), "The Other One," (9/17/1972, at 39:07), and "Playing in the Band," (5/21/1974, at 46:26).



* LeadDrummer: Kreutzmann and Hart are both types A and D. They're widely respected for their timekeeping abilities and mastery of the kits, and their polyrhythmic interplay was an essential ingredient to the Dead's sound. Hart also composed the instrumental parts to "Fire on the Mountain."



* StrawVulcan: The soldier in “Terrapin Station”.

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* StrawVulcan: The soldier in “Terrapin Station”. Station” is introduced as having 'came through many fights, but lost at love.'


The Grateful Dead were a six-piece[[labelnote:*]]Well, most of the time; there were brief periods where they were a quintet, and one 5-year-long stretch when they were a septet[[/labelnote]] group formed in UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco in the [[TheSixties mid-1960s]], best known for their improvisatory style of rock music, taking elements of PsychedelicRock, CountryMusic, FolkMusic, {{Blues}} and whatever else they thought would fit. Essentially, they were the godfathers of the Jam Band genre. They appeared at the now famous Monterey Pop Festival in 1967, and the even more famous original UsefulNotes/{{Woodstock}} festival in 1969 (however, band members admit they weren’t at top form at either one), and have a reputation for long tours and musically exploratory shows where one song often blends into another.

to:

The Grateful Dead were a six-piece[[labelnote:*]]Well, most of the time; there were brief periods where they were a quintet, and one 5-year-long stretch when they were a septet[[/labelnote]] group formed in UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco in the [[TheSixties mid-1960s]], best known for their improvisatory style of rock music, taking elements of PsychedelicRock, CountryMusic, FolkMusic, {{Blues}} and whatever else they thought would fit. Essentially, they were the godfathers of the Jam Band genre. They appeared at the now famous Monterey Pop Film/MontereyPop Festival in 1967, and the even more famous original UsefulNotes/{{Woodstock}} festival in 1969 (however, band members admit they weren’t at top form at either one), and have a reputation for long tours and musically exploratory shows where one song often blends into another.


** The only member of the band ''not'' inducted as a band member also counts as a Sixth Ranger. Bruce Hornsby (a Grammy-winning musician [[PromotedFanboy and Deadhead]]), who was the band’s keyboardist on-and-off during their last few years (he was, however, the band’s induction presenter during the ceremony).

to:

** The only member of the band ''not'' inducted as a band member also counts as a Sixth Ranger. Bruce Hornsby (a Grammy-winning musician [[PromotedFanboy and Deadhead]]), who was the band’s keyboardist on-and-off during their last few years (he was, however, years. Hornsby already had a successful career as frontman for the band’s rock group Bruce Hornsby & The Range when he began playing with the Dead, and he spent most of the late 1980s and early 1990s balancing his time between the two groups. Despite his popularity with Deadheads, Hornsby never officially joined the Dead full-time, and Garcia considered him to be a floating member who could come and go as he pleased. However, he was selected as the band's induction presenter during presented for the ceremony).Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony.


* DemBones: a common theme in their artwork, the most famous being their “Skull and Roses” logo (based on an illustration from the book ''Literature/RubaiyatOfOmarKhayyam'') and the Touch of Grey video.

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* DemBones: a common theme in their artwork, the most famous being their “Skull and Roses” logo (based on an illustration from the book ''Literature/RubaiyatOfOmarKhayyam'') and ''Literature/RubaiyatOfOmarKhayyam''), the Touch of Grey video.video, and the "Steal Your Face" skull.


Added DiffLines:

* TitledAfterTheSong: A fair chunk of their retrospective live albums after [[PlayingWithATrope key lyrics in their songs]]. For example, ''Wake Up to Find Out'' (their 3/29/1990 show) takes its title from "Eyes of the World," ''Get Shown the Light'' (their May 1977 tour collection) is from "Scarlet Begonias," and ''Believe If You Need It'' (various early '70s shows from the Pacific Northwest) is from "Box of Rain." There are some straighter examples as well, like ''So Many Roads,'' ''Truckin' Up to Buffalo,'' and ''Spring 1990 (The Other One)''.


* GreatestHitsAlbum: Thanks to their lengthy tenure, they have ''four''.

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* GreatestHitsAlbum: Thanks to their lengthy tenure, they have ''four''. The first of those, 1974's ''Skeletons from the Closet: The Best of the Grateful Dead'', has sold three million copies and is the band's best-selling album to date.

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