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''Switched-On Bach'' is the 1968 debut album by Music/WendyCarlos [[note]] at the time credited as ''Walter'' Carlos, before her 1972 [[UsefulNotes/{{Transgender}} transition/gender reassignment to a woman]] [[/note]]. This CoverAlbum performs the music of Music/JohannSebastianBach on a Moog synthesizer, which at the time was a new and controversial move. Bach was held in high esteem among music fans and the very idea that someone who dared to tamper with his work by giving it a modernized sound was considered blasphemous by some.

to:

''Switched-On Bach'' is the 1968 debut album by Music/WendyCarlos [[note]] at the time credited as ''Walter'' Carlos, before her 1972 [[UsefulNotes/{{Transgender}} transition/gender reassignment to a woman]] [[/note]]. This CoverAlbum performs the music of Music/JohannSebastianBach on a Moog synthesizer, which at the time was a new and controversial move. Bach was held in high esteem among music fans and the very idea that someone who dared to tamper with his work by giving it a modernized sound was considered blasphemous by some. \n Others believed that Bach would have approached a synthesizer as just another type of organ. Indeed, in his own day, Bach was closely involved with instrument makers, and followed technical innovations; ''The Well-Tempered Klavier'' was written to show off new techniques in piano building and tuning that would allow an instrument to be played in tune in any key.


''Switched-On Bach'' won three Grammy Awards, including "Best Classical Album", and in 2005 it was inducted in the UsefulNotes/NationalRecordingRegistry for being "historically, culturally and aesthetically important". It was one of the first uses of an electronic instrument in a way that could be taken seriously by musical purists i.e. not used as for sound effects in sci-fi movies, thus demonstrating what a synthesizer could really do. To some listeners, the clean and precise tones produced by the analog circuits gave increased clarity to Bach's original writing, even if producing the recordings was incredibly difficult.[[note]] The early Moog could only generate one note at a time, meaning that to play a chord, each note in the chord had to be recorded separately, then the multiple tracks overlaid into the final piece, with extreme care to make sure that all parts were played at the exact same tempo and synchronized correctly.[[/note]]

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''Switched-On Bach'' won three Grammy Awards, including "Best Classical Album", and in 2005 it was inducted in into the UsefulNotes/NationalRecordingRegistry in 2005 for being "historically, culturally and aesthetically important". It was one of the first uses of an electronic instrument in a way that could be taken seriously by musical purists i.e. not used as for sound effects in sci-fi movies, thus demonstrating what a synthesizer could really do. To some listeners, the clean and precise tones produced by the analog circuits gave increased clarity to Bach's original writing, even if producing the recordings was incredibly difficult.[[note]] The early Moog could only generate one note at a time, meaning that to play a chord, each note in the chord had to be recorded separately, then the multiple tracks overlaid into the final piece, with extreme care to make sure that all parts were played at the exact same tempo and synchronized correctly.[[/note]]



# "Two-Part Invention in B Flat Major" (1:30)

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# "Two-Part Invention in B Flat B-Flat Major" (1:30)



# "Prelude and Fugue No. 7 in E Flat Major" (from "The Well-Tempered Clavier") (7:07)

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# "Prelude and Fugue No. 7 in E Flat E-Flat Major" (from "The Well-Tempered Clavier") (7:07)



# "Prelude and Fugue No. 2 in C. Minor" (from "The Well-Tempered Clavier") (2:43)

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# "Prelude and Fugue No. 2 in C. C Minor" (from "The Well-Tempered Clavier") (2:43)



# "Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G. Major - Allegro" (6:35)
# "Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G. Major - Adagio" (2:50)
# "Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G. Major - Allegro" (5:05)

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# "Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G. G Major - Allegro" (6:35)
# "Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G. G Major - Adagio" (2:50)
# "Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G. G Major - Allegro" (5:05)



* RecycledInSpace: It's Johann Sebastian Bach... but played in an electronic style!

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* RecycledInSpace: It's Johann Sebastian Bach... but played in an electronic style!



* {{Sequel}}: ''Switched On Bach'' (1968) was followed by similar electronic Bach versions, such as ''The Well-Tempered Synthesizer'' (1969), ''Switched-On Bach II'' (1973), ''Switched-On Brandenburgs'' (1979) and ''Switched-On Bach 2000'' (1992).

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* {{Sequel}}: ''Switched On ''Switched-On Bach'' (1968) was followed by similar electronic Bach versions, such as ''The Well-Tempered Synthesizer'' (1969), ''Switched-On Bach II'' (1973), ''Switched-On Brandenburgs'' (1979) and ''Switched-On Bach 2000'' (1992).



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!! Switched-On Tropes

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!! Switched-On TropesTropes:



* BaroqueMusic and ClassicalMusic: Carlos was criticized for daring to mess with these centuries old masterpieces, but in fact she actually popularized the genre for people who normally perceived it as [[ClassicalMusicIsBoring boring]].

to:

* BaroqueMusic and ClassicalMusic: Carlos was criticized for daring to mess with these centuries old centuries-old masterpieces, but in fact she actually popularized the genre for people who normally perceived it as [[ClassicalMusicIsBoring boring]].


''Switched-On Bach'' is the 1968 debut album by Music/WendyCarlos [[note]] at the time credited as ''Walter'' Carlos, before her 1972 [[UsefulNotes/{{Transgender}} sex change to a woman]] [[/note]]. This CoverAlbum performs the music of Music/JohannSebastianBach on a Moog synthesizer, which at the time was a new and controversial move. Bach was held in high esteem among music fans and the very idea that someone who dared to tamper with his work by giving it a modernized sound was considered blasphemous by some.

to:

''Switched-On Bach'' is the 1968 debut album by Music/WendyCarlos [[note]] at the time credited as ''Walter'' Carlos, before her 1972 [[UsefulNotes/{{Transgender}} sex change transition/gender reassignment to a woman]] [[/note]]. This CoverAlbum performs the music of Music/JohannSebastianBach on a Moog synthesizer, which at the time was a new and controversial move. Bach was held in high esteem among music fans and the very idea that someone who dared to tamper with his work by giving it a modernized sound was considered blasphemous by some.


''Switched-On Bach'' is the 1968 debut album by Music/WendyCarlos [[note]] at the time credited as ''Walter'' Carlos, before her 1972 sex change to a woman [[/note]]. This CoverAlbum performs the music of Music/JohannSebastianBach on a Moog synthesizer, which at the time was a new and controversial move. Bach was held in high esteem among music fans and the very idea that someone who dared to tamper with his work by giving it a modernized sound was considered blasphemous by some.

to:

''Switched-On Bach'' is the 1968 debut album by Music/WendyCarlos [[note]] at the time credited as ''Walter'' Carlos, before her 1972 [[UsefulNotes/{{Transgender}} sex change to a woman woman]] [[/note]]. This CoverAlbum performs the music of Music/JohannSebastianBach on a Moog synthesizer, which at the time was a new and controversial move. Bach was held in high esteem among music fans and the very idea that someone who dared to tamper with his work by giving it a modernized sound was considered blasphemous by some.


Added DiffLines:

* ClassicalMusicIsCool: Bach's compositions brought gravitas to the emerging genre of ElectronicMusic. The result became wildly popular, showing there was plenty of life in BaroqueMusic many people might have thought was old and stuffy.


''Switched-On Bach'' won three Grammy Awards, including "Best Classical Album", and in 2005 it was inducted in the UsefulNotes/NationalRecordingRegistry for being "historically, culturally and aesthetically important". It was one of the first uses of an electronic instrument in a way that could be taken seriously by musical purists i.e. not used as for sound effects in sci-fi movies, thus demonstrating what a synthesizer could really do. To some listeners, the clean and precise tones produced by the analog circuits gave increased clarity to Bach's original writing, even if producing the recordings was incredibly difficult [[note]] The early Moog could only generate one note at a time, meaning that to play a chord, each note in the chord had to be recorded separately, then the multiple tracks overlayed into the final piece, with extreme care to make sure that all parts were played at the exact same tempo and synchronized correctly.[[/note]]

to:

''Switched-On Bach'' won three Grammy Awards, including "Best Classical Album", and in 2005 it was inducted in the UsefulNotes/NationalRecordingRegistry for being "historically, culturally and aesthetically important". It was one of the first uses of an electronic instrument in a way that could be taken seriously by musical purists i.e. not used as for sound effects in sci-fi movies, thus demonstrating what a synthesizer could really do. To some listeners, the clean and precise tones produced by the analog circuits gave increased clarity to Bach's original writing, even if producing the recordings was incredibly difficult difficult.[[note]] The early Moog could only generate one note at a time, meaning that to play a chord, each note in the chord had to be recorded separately, then the multiple tracks overlayed overlaid into the final piece, with extreme care to make sure that all parts were played at the exact same tempo and synchronized correctly.[[/note]]


* {{Bowdlerize}}: The first album cover showed Bach sitting in front of the Moog synthesizer with a look of disgust on his face while listening to the music. After objections from Carlos, the cover was replaced by a second one that showed the composer standing up, which gave him more dignity.

to:

* {{Bowdlerize}}: The first album cover showed Bach sitting in front of the Moog synthesizer with a look of disgust on his face while listening to the music. face. After objections from Carlos, the cover it was replaced by a second with one that showed the composer standing up, which gave him more dignity.



* {{Remake}}: The 1992 "Switched-On Bach 2000" is a remake of the original album, with the same tracks, but with different digital sounds.

to:

* {{Remake}}: The 1992 "Switched-On ''Switched-On Bach 2000" 2000'' is a remake of the original album, with the same tracks, but with different digital sounds.



* {{Sequel}}: "Switched On Bach" (1968) was followed by similar electronic Bach versions, such as "The Well-Tempered Synthesizer" (1969), "Switched-On Bach II" (1973), "Switched-On Brandenburgs" (1979) and "Switched-On Bach 2000" (1992).

to:

* {{Sequel}}: "Switched ''Switched On Bach" Bach'' (1968) was followed by similar electronic Bach versions, such as "The ''The Well-Tempered Synthesizer" Synthesizer'' (1969), "Switched-On ''Switched-On Bach II" II'' (1973), "Switched-On Brandenburgs" ''Switched-On Brandenburgs'' (1979) and "Switched-On ''Switched-On Bach 2000" 2000'' (1992).


"Switched-On Bach" won three Grammy Awards, including "Best Classical Album", and in 2005 it was inducted in the UsefulNotes/NationalRecordingRegistry for being "historically, culturally and aesthetically important". It was one of the first uses of an electronic instrument in a way that could be taken seriously by musical purists i.e. not used as for sound effects in sci-fi movies, thus demonstrating what a synthesizer could really do. To some listeners, the clean and precise tones produced by the analog circuits gave increased clarity to Bach's original writing, even if producing the recordings was incredibly difficult [[note]] The early Moog could only generate one note at a time, meaning that to play a chord, each note in the chord had to be recorded separately, then the multiple tracks overlayed into the final piece, with extreme care to make sure that all parts were played at the exact same tempo and synchronized correctly.[[/note]]

to:

"Switched-On Bach" ''Switched-On Bach'' won three Grammy Awards, including "Best Classical Album", and in 2005 it was inducted in the UsefulNotes/NationalRecordingRegistry for being "historically, culturally and aesthetically important". It was one of the first uses of an electronic instrument in a way that could be taken seriously by musical purists i.e. not used as for sound effects in sci-fi movies, thus demonstrating what a synthesizer could really do. To some listeners, the clean and precise tones produced by the analog circuits gave increased clarity to Bach's original writing, even if producing the recordings was incredibly difficult [[note]] The early Moog could only generate one note at a time, meaning that to play a chord, each note in the chord had to be recorded separately, then the multiple tracks overlayed into the final piece, with extreme care to make sure that all parts were played at the exact same tempo and synchronized correctly.[[/note]]



* {{Instrumental}}: All tracks are instrumental.

to:

* {{Instrumental}}: All tracks are instrumental.{{Instrumentals}}: The whole album.


* BaroqueMusic and ClassicalMusic: Carlos was criticized for daring to mess with these centuries old masterpieces, but in fact she actually popularized the genre for people who normally perceived [[ClassicalMusicIsBoring it as boring.]].

to:

* BaroqueMusic and ClassicalMusic: Carlos was criticized for daring to mess with these centuries old masterpieces, but in fact she actually popularized the genre for people who normally perceived it as [[ClassicalMusicIsBoring it as boring.]].boring]].



* {{Synthpop}}: One of the landmark albums.

to:

* {{Synthpop}}: SynthPop: One of the landmark albums.


* CompletelyDifferentTitle: The German version added a subtitle to the album, "Barock-Revolution oder die seltsamen Abendteuer des J.S. Bach im Land der Elektronen" or "Baroque Revolution or the Unusual Adventures of J.S. Bach in the Land of Electrons", which makes it sound as if it was some sort of {{Audioplay}}.



* FollowTheLeader: Other electronic adaptations of classical music have followed, most notably by Isao Tomita (who scored Music/GustavHolst's "The Planets", Music/IgorStravinsky's ''Theatre/TheFirebird'', Music/ClaudeDebussy's "Clair de Lune" and Music/ModestMussorgsky's ''Theatre/PicturesAtAnExhibition'') and Music/FrankZappa (who scored the work of obscure composer Francesco Zappa on ''Music/FrancescoZappa'').


"Switched-On Bach" won three Grammy Awards, including "Best Classical Album", and in 2005 it was inducted in the UsefulNotes/NationalRecordingRegistry for being "historically, culturally and aesthetically important".

to:

"Switched-On Bach" won three Grammy Awards, including "Best Classical Album", and in 2005 it was inducted in the UsefulNotes/NationalRecordingRegistry for being "historically, culturally and aesthetically important".
important". It was one of the first uses of an electronic instrument in a way that could be taken seriously by musical purists i.e. not used as for sound effects in sci-fi movies, thus demonstrating what a synthesizer could really do. To some listeners, the clean and precise tones produced by the analog circuits gave increased clarity to Bach's original writing, even if producing the recordings was incredibly difficult [[note]] The early Moog could only generate one note at a time, meaning that to play a chord, each note in the chord had to be recorded separately, then the multiple tracks overlayed into the final piece, with extreme care to make sure that all parts were played at the exact same tempo and synchronized correctly.[[/note]]


* {{Bowdlerize}}: The first album cover showed Bach sitting in front of the Moog synthesizer with a look of disgust on his face while listening to the music. This cover was replaced by a second one that showed the composer standing up, which gave him more dignity.

to:

* ArtisticLicenseMusic: The original cover features Bach reacting in disgust at the sounds of the synthesizer. However, the earphones are plugged into the input jack of a 914 Filter module, which is itself connected to nothing. This, combined with the fact that he is not playing anything at the moment the picture is taken, means that Bach wouldn't have heard anything. This inaccuracy is one of the reasons the cover was replaced.
* {{Bowdlerize}}: The first album cover showed Bach sitting in front of the Moog synthesizer with a look of disgust on his face while listening to the music. This After objections from Carlos, the cover was replaced by a second one that showed the composer standing up, which gave him more dignity.


'''Switched-On Bach''' is the 1968 debut album by Music/WendyCarlos [[note]] at the time credited as ''Walter'' Carlos, before her 1972 sex change to a woman [[/note]]. This CoverAlbum performs the music of Music/JohannSebastianBach on a Moog synthesizer, which at the time was a new and controversial move. Bach was held in high esteem among music fans and the very idea that someone who dared to tamper with his work by giving it a modernized sound was considered blasphemous by some.

to:

'''Switched-On Bach''' ''Switched-On Bach'' is the 1968 debut album by Music/WendyCarlos [[note]] at the time credited as ''Walter'' Carlos, before her 1972 sex change to a woman [[/note]]. This CoverAlbum performs the music of Music/JohannSebastianBach on a Moog synthesizer, which at the time was a new and controversial move. Bach was held in high esteem among music fans and the very idea that someone who dared to tamper with his work by giving it a modernized sound was considered blasphemous by some.

Added DiffLines:

* InTheStyleOf: For the re-release, Carlos wrote a Second Movement for the Third Brandenburg (which doesn't have a Second Movement) which sounds as if Bach wrote it.

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