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* WomanInWhite: The PV for "Shuraba". Also invokes AsceticAesthetic, as the only other colour in it is [[WhiteShirtOfDeath red]].


** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "[=JL005=]便で" and "NIPPON" on ''Sunny''. The track listings on Ringo's official website for these songs - and also "FOUL", "FAIR", and "ドーパミント! BPM103" - use the Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms characters, for what that's worth. Also, for the record, the intended translation for "saita" appears to be "Bloomed", which would be written in Japanese as "咲いた". It could also mean "The Most" if written as "最多", and that's not even the only other possible Japanese word that would be romanised as "saita".)

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** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "[=JL005=]便で" and "NIPPON" on ''Sunny''. The track listings on Ringo's official website for these songs - and also "FOUL", "FAIR", and "ドーパミント! BPM103" [=BPM103=]" - use the Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms characters, for what that's worth. Also, for the record, the intended translation for "saita" appears to be "Bloomed", which would be written in Japanese as "咲いた". It could also mean "The Most" if written as "最多", and that's not even the only other possible Japanese word that would be romanised as "saita".)


** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "[=JL005=]便で" and "NIPPON" on ''Sunny''. Also, for the record, the intended translation for "saita" appears to be "Bloomed", which would be written in Japanese as "咲いた". It could also mean "The Most" if written as "最多", and that's not even the only other possible Japanese word that would be romanised as "saita".)

to:

** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "[=JL005=]便で" and "NIPPON" on ''Sunny''. The track listings on Ringo's official website for these songs - and also "FOUL", "FAIR", and "ドーパミント! BPM103" - use the Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms characters, for what that's worth. Also, for the record, the intended translation for "saita" appears to be "Bloomed", which would be written in Japanese as "咲いた". It could also mean "The Most" if written as "最多", and that's not even the only other possible Japanese word that would be romanised as "saita".)



* {{Jazz}}: Much of her material falls into this genre, particularly on ''Heisei Fūzoku'' (which is mostly orchestral jazz) and ''Sanmon Gossip'' (a GenreRoulette of numerous different jazz styles which Wikipedia categorises as "[[ThisIsYourPremiseOnDrugs acid jazz]]", which is probably as close to as accurate a two-word description as possible).
* LastNoteNightmare: "Sōretsu" is a particularly notable case of this, though considering that its title translates as "Funeral" and it's the final track of an album that is [[FourIsDeath 44 minutes and 44 seconds long]], anything else would have been a massive surprise. The song builds to a particularly cacophonic climax before suddenly [[NoEnding cutting off]]. She's done it a few other times as well. "Bonsai Hada" ends with Shiina essentially screaming her lungs out over an increasingly cacophonic accordion performance, then she stops singing and the accordion gets even more cacophonic before it, too, stops. This is followed almost immediately by "Yokyō", arguably the only rock song on ''Sanmon Gossip''.



* MoodWhiplash: Several of her albums feature examples of this between tracks, due in no small part due to her heavy employment of GenreRoulette mixed with {{Siamese Twin Song|s}} transitions.



* NewSoundAlbum: ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana''. It performed worse than its predecessor commercially (dropping from 2.3 million to 400,000 in sales) but better critically.

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* NewSoundAlbum: ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana''. It performed worse than its predecessor commercially (dropping from 2.3 million to 400,000 in sales) but better critically.critically, often being listed as one of the finest Japanese rock albums of the decade.



* PopStarComposer: Shiina was asked to do the music for Japanese film ''Sakuran''.

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* PopStarComposer: Shiina was asked to do the music for Japanese film ''Sakuran''.''{{Manga/Sakuran}}''.


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* TitledAfterTheSong: "Shijō no jinsei" is titled in tribute to Music/JohnColtrane's seminal 1965 album ''Music/ALoveSupreme''. If the song's official translation of "A Life Supreme" didn't give it away, the single and album covers will: the single uses the exact same typeface as the Coltrane album, and even prints the text at the exact same angle.

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** The lengths of her albums can also qualify. ''Shoso Strip'' runs for 55:55, ''KSK'' for 44:44, and ''Sanmon Gossip'' for 50:05.

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* MusicalPastiche: She has done a few of these. "Tsugō no Ii Karada" might as well be a Burt Bacharach song, for instance, between its soaring melodic hooks and Neko Saitō's energetic, brass and strings-heavy arrangement for it.



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* ''Sandokushi'' (三毒史, ''Three Poisons Klesha'', 2019)



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* ''Gyakuyunyū: Kōkūkyoku'' (逆輸入〜航空局〜, ''Reimport Vol. 2 Civil Aviation Bureau'', 2017)


* BilingualBonus: Amongst the languages in which she has sung are SurprisinglyGoodEnglish, Japanese, and French.

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* BilingualBonus: Amongst the languages in which Besides her native Japanese, she has also sung are in SurprisinglyGoodEnglish, Japanese, French, German and French.Portuguese. Most of the latter three are found on ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~''.


* ''Heisei Fūzoku'' (平成風俗, ''Heisei Customs'', 2007, soundtrack project for the film ''Sakuran'', based on [[Manga/{{Sakuran}} the manga of the same name]])

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* ''Heisei Fūzoku'' (平成風俗, ''Heisei Customs'', 2007, soundtrack project for the film ''Sakuran'', based on [[Manga/{{Sakuran}} the manga of the same name]])name]]. Also sometimes known as ''Japanese Manners''.[[note]]Despite being considered a Shiina solo album, all members of Tokyo Jihen appear on it except for drummer Toshiki Hata, who had broken his leg and was therefore unable to participate in the sessions.[[/note]])



* ''Hi Izuru Tokoro'' (日出処, ''Land of the Rising Sun'', 2014)

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* ''Hi Izuru Tokoro'' (日出処, ''Land of the Rising Sun'', 2014)
2014. Also sometimes known by its simplified title, ''Sunny'')


** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "[=JL005=]便で" and "NIPPON" on ''Sunny''. Also, for the record, "saita" is officially translated as "Bloomed", which would be written in Japanese as "咲いた". It could also mean "The Most" if written as "さいた" or "最多", and that's not even the only other possible Japanese word that would be romanised as "saita".)

to:

** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "[=JL005=]便で" and "NIPPON" on ''Sunny''. Also, for the record, the intended translation for "saita" is officially translated as appears to be "Bloomed", which would be written in Japanese as "咲いた". It could also mean "The Most" if written as "さいた" or "最多", and that's not even the only other possible Japanese word that would be romanised as "saita".)


** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "[=JL005=]便で" and "NIPPON" on ''Sunny''. Also, for the record, "saita", written in Japanese as "さいた" or "最多", means "The Most".)

to:

** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "[=JL005=]便で" and "NIPPON" on ''Sunny''. Also, for the record, "saita", "saita" is officially translated as "Bloomed", which would be written in Japanese as "咲いた". It could also mean "The Most" if written as "さいた" or "最多", means "The Most".and that's not even the only other possible Japanese word that would be romanised as "saita".)


** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "JL005便で" and "Nippon" on ''Sunny''. Also, for the record, "saita", written in Japanese as "さいた" or "最多", means "The Most".)

to:

** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "JL005便で" "[=JL005=]便で" and "Nippon" "NIPPON" on ''Sunny''. Also, for the record, "saita", written in Japanese as "さいた" or "最多", means "The Most".)


** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''.

to:

** It's worth pointing out that not only are the number of characters in each song symmetrical, but frequently the scripts used are symmetrical as well. For example, the first and eleventh tracks on ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' have two Kanji characters in their titles, while the second and tenth have eight katakana characters, and so on. Even when the characters themselves aren't symmetrical, she'll sometimes make the track listings symmetrical in other ways; for example, the even-numbered track titles on each disc of ''Utaite Myōri ~Sono Ichi~'' are written in English, while the odd-numbered ones are in Japanese (which does not always match with the language(s) sung in the songs). And often there is thematic symmetry as well; for example, the first six songs of ''Shōso Strip'' describe a crime and the last six describe a punishment, with the first song translating as "I Am a Liar" and the last translating as "I Am an Addict". Or consider "Fair" and "Foul" on ''Sports''. (Note that, in a few cases, it's necessary to use the "Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms" set of Unicode characters to make the symmetry work - "sa_i_ta" rather than "sa_i_ta" on ''color bars'', for example, as well as "JL005便で" and "NIPPON" [or, if you hate all-caps track lists, "Nippon"] rather than "JL005便で" and "Nippon" on ''Sunny''. Also, for the record, "saita", written in Japanese as "さいた" or "最多", means "The Most".)


* FourIsDeath: ''Kalk Samen Kuri no Hana'' is 44:44.4 long (and the last song is titled "Sōretsu," translated "Funeral").

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/shiina.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350: In person]]

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