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* OdeToSobriety: "That's Why I'm Here"


For the first stretch of his career up to the TurnOfTheMillennium, Chesney was of a decidedly more "mainstream" bent, delivering slick, twangy honky-tonk country. Starting with ''No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems'' in 2002, he dialed back on the twang somewhat and began recording a blend of arena rock, upbeat "beachy" tunes clearly inspired from Music/JimmyBuffett, and soft introspective ballads. His albums since this point have drawn from a mix of acclaimed yet largely obscure sources, including Mac [=McAnally=], Matraca Berg, Charlie Robison, and Mindy Smith. He has also drawn many non-country names into his material, such as Music/UncleKracker, [[Music/BobMarley The Wailers]], Music/{{Dave Matthews|Band}}, Grace Potter (of Grace Potter and the Nocturnals), Ziggy Marley, and Music/{{Pink}}.

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For the first stretch of his career up to the TurnOfTheMillennium, Chesney was of a decidedly more "mainstream" bent, delivering slick, twangy honky-tonk country. Starting with ''No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems'' in 2002, he dialed back on the twang somewhat and began recording a blend of arena rock, upbeat "beachy" tunes clearly inspired from Music/JimmyBuffett, and soft introspective ballads. His albums since this point have drawn from a mix of acclaimed yet largely obscure sources, including Mac [=McAnally=], Matraca Berg, Charlie Robison, and Mindy Smith. He has also drawn many non-country names into his material, such as Music/UncleKracker, [[Music/BobMarley The Wailers]], Music/{{Dave Matthews|Band}}, Grace Potter (of Grace Potter and the Nocturnals), Ziggy Marley, and Music/{{Pink}}.

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** 2018's "Better Boat" broke an uninterrupted string of ''51'' top 20 singles dating all the way back to 1998.

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For the first stretch of his career up to the TurnOfTheMillennium, Chesney was of a decidedly more "mainstream" bent, delivering slick, twangy honky-tonk country. Starting with ''No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems'' in 2002, he dialed back on the twang somewhat and began recording a blend of arena rock, upbeat "beachy" tunes clearly inspired from Music/JimmyBuffett, and soft introspective ballads. His albums since this point have drawn from a mix of acclaimed yet largely obscure sources, including Mac [=McAnally=], Matraca Berg, Charlie Robison, and Mindy Smith. He has also drawn many non-country names into his material, such as Music/UncleKracker, [[Music/BobMarley The Wailers]], Music/{{Dave Matthews|Band}}, Grace Potter (of Grace Potter and the Nocturnals), Ziggy Marley, and Music/{{Pink}}.



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* ''Songs for the Saints'' (2018)



** Inverted with his duet vocal on Music/RebaMcEntire's "Every Other Weekend". The song first charted as an album cut credited to both artists. When it was officially released as a single, the radio edit had co-writer Skip Ewing singing Kenny's parts, although most stations just played the Chesney version anyway. As a result, it was credited to "Reba [=McEntire=] with Kenny Chesney or Skip Ewing" for one week, then just Reba after that.

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** Inverted with his duet vocal on Music/RebaMcEntire's "Every Other Weekend". The song first charted as an album cut credited to both artists. When it was officially released as a single, the radio edit had co-writer Skip Ewing [[FakeShemp singing Kenny's parts, parts]] due to a label disagreement, although most stations just played the Chesney version anyway. As a result, it was credited ''only'' to "Reba [=McEntire=] with Kenny Chesney or Skip Ewing" for one week, then just Reba after that.on the charts.


Following the closure of BNA in 2012, Chesney has moved to Creator/ColumbiaRecords' Nashville division.

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Following the closure of BNA in 2012, Chesney has moved to Creator/ColumbiaRecords' Nashville division.
division. He moved again to Creator/WarnerBrosRecords in January 2018.



** Inverted with his duet vocal on Music/RebaMcEntire's "Every Other Weekend", on which he sings a good portion of the song. The song first charted as an album cut credited to both artists. When it was officially released as a single, the radio edit had co-writer Skip Ewing singing Kenny's parts, although most stations just played the Chesney version anyway. As a result, it was credited to "Reba [=McEntire=] with Kenny Chesney or Skip Ewing" for one week, then just Reba after that.

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** Inverted with his duet vocal on Music/RebaMcEntire's "Every Other Weekend", on which he sings a good portion of the song.Weekend". The song first charted as an album cut credited to both artists. When it was officially released as a single, the radio edit had co-writer Skip Ewing singing Kenny's parts, although most stations just played the Chesney version anyway. As a result, it was credited to "Reba [=McEntire=] with Kenny Chesney or Skip Ewing" for one week, then just Reba after that.



** Kenny charted at least #1 country hit for every calendar year since 2001... until 2013, when his only two single releases that year peaked at #3 and #14. Even worse, the streak managed to resume afterthat.

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** Kenny charted at least #1 country hit for every calendar year since 2001... until 2013, when his only two single releases that year peaked at #3 and #14. Even worse, the streak managed to resume afterthat.after that.



* PopculturalOsmosisFailure: According to a column in ''Country Weekly'', Kenny had a line in his 2005 hit "Summertime" changed because the original lyrics mentioned snow cones, and he had no idea what a snow cone was.

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* PopculturalOsmosisFailure: According to a column in ''Country Weekly'', Kenny had a line in his 2005 hit "Summertime" changed because the original lyrics mentioned snow cones, and he Kenny had no idea what a snow cone was.they were.


* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: His 1990s albums were largely mainstream "neotraditionalist" country, and he fit right in with the "hat act"s of the day. By the late 1990s, he shifted to a slicker country-pop sound that netted two of his biggest hits ("How Forever Feels" and "The Good Stuff") before moving again to his now-iconic "beachy" sound with ''No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems''.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: His 1990s albums were largely mainstream "neotraditionalist" country, and he fit right in with the "hat act"s of the day. By the late 1990s, he shifted to a slicker country-pop sound that netted two of his biggest hits ("How Forever Feels" and "The Good Stuff") before moving again to his now-iconic combination of laid-back "beachy" sound country, introspective acoustic material, and arena-rock with ''No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems''.Problems''. Around ''Hemingway's Whiskey'', the arena-rock started disappearing too.



* PopculturalOsmosisFailure: According to a column in ''Country Weekly'', Kenny asked the writers of his 2005 hit "Summertime" if they would change the opening lines, because they mentioned snow cones, and he had no idea what they were.

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* PopculturalOsmosisFailure: According to a column in ''Country Weekly'', Kenny asked the writers of had a line in his 2005 hit "Summertime" if they would change the opening lines, changed because they the original lyrics mentioned snow cones, and he had no idea what they were.a snow cone was.



* RereleaseTheSong: Chesney re-recorded his 1994 single "The Tin Man" for his first GreatestHitsAlbum and released the new version in 2001. The re-release has the distinction of being the only thing he released between 1999 and 2012 that didn't hit Top 10.

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* RereleaseTheSong: RereleaseTheSong:
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Chesney re-recorded his 1994 single "The Tin Man" for his first GreatestHitsAlbum and released the new version in 2001. The re-release has the distinction of being the only thing he released between 1999 and 2012 that didn't hit Top 10.2001.

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* BrokenWinLossStreak:
** Kenny charted at least #1 country hit for every calendar year since 2001... until 2013, when his only two single releases that year peaked at #3 and #14. Even worse, the streak managed to resume afterthat.
** ''Cosmic Hallelujah'' is his first album since his 1994 debut not to be certified by the RIAA.


* AdvertisedExtra: [[Music/BobMarley The Wailers]] on "Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven" — their part is cut out of the radio edit, but they still got chart credit (from the second week at #1 onward, at least).

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* AdvertisedExtra: AdvertisedExtra:
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[[Music/BobMarley The Wailers]] on "Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven" — their part is cut out of the radio edit, but they still got chart credit (from the second week at #1 onward, at least).


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** Grace Potter was credited for her backing vocals on both "You and Tequila" and "Wild Child", but ''[[ZigZaggedTrope not]]'' on "El Cerrito Place" in between.


A man of both the arenas and the beaches. Born in 1968, Chesney began performing in his teenage years, before working at clubs before signing a deal with Capricorn Records in 1993. Capricorn had no experience in the country music field, however; the album received minimal promotion, its singles tanked, and the label closed its Nashville branch.

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A man of both the arenas and the beaches. Born in 1968, beaches, Kenneth Arnold "Kenny" Chesney (born March 26, 1968) began performing in his teenage years, before working at clubs before signing a deal with Capricorn Records in 1993. Capricorn had no experience in the country music field, however; the album received minimal promotion, its singles tanked, and the label closed its Nashville branch.


* BrokenWinLossStreak: ''Life on a Rock'' was his first album since his little-known debut not to be certified gold or higher.


* ''No Shirt, No Shoes, No Problems'' (2002)

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* ''No Shoes, No Shirt, No Shoes, No Problems'' (2002)


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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: His 1990s albums were largely mainstream "neotraditionalist" country, and he fit right in with the "hat act"s of the day. By the late 1990s, he shifted to a slicker country-pop sound that netted two of his biggest hits ("How Forever Feels" and "The Good Stuff") before moving again to his now-iconic "beachy" sound with ''No Shoes, No Shirt, No Problems''.


* {{Bowdlerize}}: "Reality" changed the line "Yeah, some days it's a bitch, it's a bummer" to "…it's just bad, it's a bummer."

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* {{Bowdlerize}}: {{Bowdlerize}}:
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"Reality" changed the line "Yeah, some days it's a bitch, it's a bummer" to "…it's just bad, it's a bummer."bummer" for the radio edit.
** For the radio edit of "All the Pretty Girls", "All the lost boys say 'I wanna get laid'" becomes "All the lost boys wanna stay out late".


* BrokenStreak: ''Life on a Rock'' was his first album since his little-known debut not to be certified gold or higher.

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* BrokenStreak: BrokenWinLossStreak: ''Life on a Rock'' was his first album since his little-known debut not to be certified gold or higher.


* ChartDisplacement: While many of his #1 hits have been forgotten, "She Thinks My Tractor's Sexy" remains one of his most popular despite only hitting #11.

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