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* SomethingSomethingLeonardBernstein: As mentioned above, the part of "American Pie" most people know (aside from the chorus) is "the day the music died".


* CoverVersion: Typically one or two per album, with some all-cover albums as well. His version of Music/RoyOrbison's "Crying" gave him a comeback hit in 1980. Continuing with the theme established on "American Pie", he's done several Music/BuddyHolly covers.

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* CoverVersion: Typically one or two per album, with some all-cover albums {{Cover Album}}s as well. His version of Music/RoyOrbison's "Crying" gave him a comeback hit in 1980. Continuing with the theme established on "American Pie", he's done several Music/BuddyHolly covers.covers, the best known being "Everyday" and "Fool's Paradise".

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* CoverVersion: Typically one or two per album, with some all-cover albums as well. His version of Music/RoyOrbison's "Crying" gave him a comeback hit in 1980. Continuing with the theme established on "American Pie", he's done several Music/BuddyHolly covers.

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* SelfPlagiarism: "Vincent" and "Empty Chairs" are ''very'' similar in structure, tempo and chords, and both come from the same album.


An interesting sidenote regarding [=McLean=] is that, according to songwriter Lori Lieberman, he is the unnamed singer in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpNdMIAnKko "Killing Me Softly With His Song"]] (a song Lieberman wrote that was later a hit for both Roberta Flack and Music/TheFugees). For decades, [=McLean=] was totally unaware he was the inspiration for this song. When he found out, he said, "I'm absolutely amazed. I've heard both Lori's and Roberta's version and I must say I'm very humbled about the whole thing. You can't help but feel that way about a song written and performed as well as this one is."

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An interesting sidenote regarding [=McLean=] is that, according to songwriter Lori Lieberman, he is the unnamed singer in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpNdMIAnKko "Killing Me Softly With His Song"]] (a song Lieberman wrote that was later a hit for both Roberta Flack and Music/TheFugees). The song was inspired when Lieberman saw him perform at a club and was struck by his sad breakup song "Empty Chairs". For decades, [=McLean=] was totally unaware he was the inspiration for this song. When he found out, he said, "I'm absolutely amazed. I've heard both Lori's and Roberta's version and I must say I'm very humbled about the whole thing. You can't help but feel that way about a song written and performed as well as this one is."


* CynicismCatalyst: Amidst all the WordSaladLyrics, "American Pie" repeatedly references "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_the_Music_Died the day the music died]]" -- the day of the plane crash that killed rock and roll musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson.

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* CynicismCatalyst: Amidst all the WordSaladLyrics, "American Pie" "Music/AmericanPie" repeatedly references "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_the_Music_Died the day the music died]]" -- the day of the plane crash that killed rock and roll musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson.

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* CynicismCatalyst: Amidst all the WordSaladLyrics, "American Pie" repeatedly references "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_the_Music_Died the day the music died]]" -- the day of the plane crash that killed rock and roll musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson.


By far best known for "American Pie" (which was voted Number 5 of the 365 Songs of the Century by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts), Don [=McLean=] is an influential folk-rock singer/songwriter. He reached the height of his success in the 70s with his album, ''Music/AmericanPie'', which contained the titular hit as well as the other notable single, "Vincent."

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By far best known for "American Pie" (which was voted Number 5 of the 365 Songs of the Century by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts), Don Donald [=McLean=] III (born October 2, 1945) is an influential folk-rock singer/songwriter. He reached the height of his success in the 70s with his album, ''Music/AmericanPie'', which contained the titular hit as well as the other notable single, "Vincent."

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* ''Tapestry'' (1970)


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* ''Don [=McLean=]'' (1972)
* ''Playin' Favorites'' (1973)
* ''Homeless Brother'' (1974)
* ''Prime Time'' (1977)
* ''Chain Lightning'' (1978)
* ''Believers'' (1981)
* ''Love Tracks'' (1987)
* ''For the Memories Vols I and II'' (1989)
* ''Headroom'' (1990)
* ''Christmas'' (1991)
* ''The River of Love'' (1995)
* ''Christmas Dreams'' (1997)
* ''Sings Marty Robbins'' (2001)
* ''You've Got to Share: Songs for Children'' (2003)
* ''The Western Album'' (2003)
* ''Rearview Mirror: An American Musical Journey'' (2005)
* ''Addicted to Black'' (2009)


* ''Music/AmericanPie'' (1970)

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* ''Music/AmericanPie'' (1970)(1971)


An interesting sidenote regarding [=McLean=] is that, according to songwriter Lori Lieberman, he is the unnamed singer in "Killing Me Softly With His Song" (a song Lieberman wrote that was later a hit for both Roberta Flack and Music/TheFugees). For decades, [=McLean=] was totally unaware he was the inspiration for this song. When he found out, he said, "I'm absolutely amazed. I've heard both Lori's and Roberta's version and I must say I'm very humbled about the whole thing. You can't help but feel that way about a song written and performed as well as this one is."

to:

An interesting sidenote regarding [=McLean=] is that, according to songwriter Lori Lieberman, he is the unnamed singer in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpNdMIAnKko "Killing Me Softly With His Song" Song"]] (a song Lieberman wrote that was later a hit for both Roberta Flack and Music/TheFugees). For decades, [=McLean=] was totally unaware he was the inspiration for this song. When he found out, he said, "I'm absolutely amazed. I've heard both Lori's and Roberta's version and I must say I'm very humbled about the whole thing. You can't help but feel that way about a song written and performed as well as this one is."

Added DiffLines:

An interesting sidenote regarding [=McLean=] is that, according to songwriter Lori Lieberman, he is the unnamed singer in "Killing Me Softly With His Song" (a song Lieberman wrote that was later a hit for both Roberta Flack and Music/TheFugees). For decades, [=McLean=] was totally unaware he was the inspiration for this song. When he found out, he said, "I'm absolutely amazed. I've heard both Lori's and Roberta's version and I must say I'm very humbled about the whole thing. You can't help but feel that way about a song written and performed as well as this one is."


By far best known for "American Pie" (which was voted Number 5 of the 365 Songs of the Century by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts), Don [=McLean=] is an influential folk-rock singer/songwriter. He reached the height of his success in the 70s with his album, ''American Pie'', which contained the titular hit as well as the other notable single, "Vincent."

"American Pie" was written in memory of Music/BuddyHolly, Ritchie Valens, and The Big Bopper, who were killed in a plane crash in 1959. The song popularized the phrase "The Day the Music Died" in reference to the event. The lyrics also reflect the impact that event had on [=McLean's=] childhood and the song is semi-autobiographical in nature. It reached number one on the charts for four weeks in 1972 and holds the record for the longest song to occupy that slot, with a run time of 8 minutes 36 seconds (though only half the song was on the A-side; the other half was on the B-side).

to:

By far best known for "American Pie" (which was voted Number 5 of the 365 Songs of the Century by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment for the Arts), Don [=McLean=] is an influential folk-rock singer/songwriter. He reached the height of his success in the 70s with his album, ''American Pie'', ''Music/AmericanPie'', which contained the titular hit as well as the other notable single, "Vincent."

"American Pie" was written in memory of Music/BuddyHolly, Ritchie Valens, Music/RitchieValens, and The Big Bopper, Music/TheBigBopper, who were killed in a plane crash in 1959. The song popularized the phrase "The Day the Music Died" in reference to the event. The lyrics also reflect the impact that event had on [=McLean's=] childhood and the song is semi-autobiographical in nature. It reached number one on the charts for four weeks in 1972 and holds the record for the longest song to occupy that slot, with a run time of 8 minutes 36 seconds (though only half the song was on the A-side; the other half was on the B-side).




'''Albums'''
* ''Music/AmericanPie'' (1970)



%%* IntelligenceEqualsIsolation: "Vincent"

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%%* * IntelligenceEqualsIsolation: "Vincent""Vincent" sings how Van Gogh was a creative genius ahead of his time, but that this made him a recluse too, misunderstood by others.



%%* WordSaladLyrics: "American Pie"



->''"This will be the day that I died."''

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->''"This will be the day that I died.die."''


%%* IAmGreatSong: "Everybody Loves Me, Baby"

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%%* * IAmGreatSong: The narrator in "Everybody Loves Me, Baby"Baby" claims that he's got everything in the world, except the person who he's singing the song to.


* LyricalDissonance:
%%** "Primetime"
** Also "Have You Seen Me?", which is a rollicking number about... child soldiers.

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* LyricalDissonance:
%%** "Primetime"
** Also
LyricalDissonance: "Have You Seen Me?", which Me?" is a rollicking number about... child soldiers.soldiers.
%%** "Primetime" (Please correct the indentation when you add context to and uncomment this one.)



* WordSaladLyrics: "American Pie"

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* %%* WordSaladLyrics: "American Pie"

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