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* ActualPacifism: A rather large part of the band's core philosophy, both out of pragmatism (violence would discredit their cause) and out of idealism (violence is fundamentally antithetical to their vision of anarchism). Some conflicts would later occur when some band members began to take issue with this.

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* ActualPacifism: ActualPacifist: A rather large part of the band's core philosophy, both out of pragmatism (violence would discredit their cause) and out of idealism (violence is fundamentally antithetical to their vision of anarchism). Some conflicts would later occur when some band members began to take issue with this.



* LyricalDissonance: Between the violence of the band's music and the ActualPacifism of their message. Vocalist Gee Vaucher [[DiscussedTrope discussed]] this in an interview about ''Yes Sir, I Will'':

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* LyricalDissonance: Between the violence of the band's music and the ActualPacifism ActualPacifist of their message. Vocalist Gee Vaucher [[DiscussedTrope discussed]] this in an interview about ''Yes Sir, I Will'':

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** In the song "Bloody Revolutions" Crass take great pains to attack revolutionary Marxist positions that violence [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans could be a means to a good end]], which got them much scorn from Marxist punk bands, one of which said that Crass's politics, "like [[{{UsefulNotes/Anarchism}} Kropotkin's]], [were] up shit creek."
---> ''Nothing changed for all the death, that their ideas created.'' \\
''It's just the same fascistic games, but the rules aren't clearly stated.'' \\
''Nothing's really different, 'cause all government's the same,'' \\
''They can call it freedom, but slavery is the game'' \\
''There's nothing that you offer but a dream of last year's hero'' \\
''[[WhamLine The truth of revolution, brother...]] is YearZero.''


Added DiffLines:

* UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans: Crass take great pains to attack this idea from Marxists in "Bloody Revolutions", mentioned above under BombThrowingAnarchists.


-->''And you'll never change the system by bombing number ten''

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-->''And you'll never change the system by bombing number ten''[[UsefulNotes/BritishPoliticalSystem No. 10]]''


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* CallAndResponseSong: Common at at Crass's shows. A particularly notable mention has to go to "So What", which features a call-and-response in the studio recording.
--> ''I'm just a person, a human being!'' \\
'''''NO YOU'RE NOT, YOU'RE A PART OF A MACHINE!'''''


Formed in 1977 out of Dial House (an open-house community near Epping, Essex), '''Crass''' were an English PunkRock band that promoted [[UsefulNotes/{{Anarchism}} anarchy]] as a political ideology, a resistance movement, and a way of life, and attracted controversy multiple times through the duration of their career - even to the point of causing an international scandal. The band formed when Dial House founder Jeremy Ratter started jamming with then-resident Steven Williams (who took the names of Penny Rimbaud and Steve Ignorant, respectively) after the former saw a gig by Music/TheClash and was inspired by Joe Strummer telling his audience to start their own bands if they thought they could do better. Penny and Steve produced "Do They Owe Us a Living?" and "So What" as a drum and vocal duo, and chose the name Crass as a reference to a line [[note]] "the kids are just crass" [[/note]] in ''Music/TheRiseAndFallOfZiggyStardustAndTheSpidersFromMars'' by Music/DavidBowie.

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Formed in 1977 out of Dial House (an open-house community near Epping, Essex), '''Crass''' Crass were an English PunkRock band that promoted [[UsefulNotes/{{Anarchism}} anarchy]] as a political ideology, a resistance movement, and a way of life, and attracted controversy multiple times through the duration of their career - even to the point of causing an international scandal. The band formed when Dial House founder Jeremy Ratter started jamming with then-resident Steven Williams (who took the names of Penny Rimbaud and Steve Ignorant, respectively) after the former saw a gig by Music/TheClash and was inspired by Joe Strummer telling his audience to start their own bands if they thought they could do better. Penny and Steve produced "Do They Owe Us a Living?" and "So What" as a drum and vocal duo, and chose the name Crass as a reference to a line [[note]] "the kids are just crass" [[/note]] in ''Music/TheRiseAndFallOfZiggyStardustAndTheSpidersFromMars'' by Music/DavidBowie.

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* ADayInTheLimelight: The whole of ''Penis Envy'' is one for female vocalist Eva Libertine (with Joy de Vivre providing vocals on the track "Health Surface").


* HeroicBSOD: When Crass was recording ''Christ - The Album'', the Falklands war had begun and ended, causing the band to question their relevance as a political band. Fortunately, they pulled everything together and managed to come back with a vengeance...[[SubvertedTrope until their breakup in 1984]. [[DoubleSubversion However, they were planning on breaking up that year anyway, so...]]

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* HeroicBSOD: When Crass was recording ''Christ - The Album'', the Falklands war had begun and ended, causing the band to question their relevance as a political band. Fortunately, they pulled everything together and managed to come back with a vengeance...[[SubvertedTrope until their breakup in 1984].1984]]. [[DoubleSubversion However, they were planning on breaking up that year anyway, so...]]


* CapitalismIsBad: Like most Anarcho-Punk bands they identify capitalism as a system of slavery that most people aren't even aware of.

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* CapitalismIsBad: Like most Anarcho-Punk bands they identify capitalism as a system of slavery destruction and exploitation that most people aren't even aware of.of, and take the belief that it must be destroyed.



* CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority: Contrary to many other protest musicians the band really lived up to its name. They actively tried to cause revolution by not joining a major label and making their audience think about life as it is. They also live in a commune to this day where they make their own bread and supplies and effectively live outside society. When it became clear in 1984 that they won't reach their goals by that date they disbanded themselves.

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* CoolPeopleRebelAgainstAuthority: Contrary to many other protest musicians the band really lived up to its name. They actively tried to cause revolution by not joining a major label and making their audience think about life as it is. They also live in a commune to this day where they make their own bread and supplies and effectively live outside society. When it became clear in 1984 that they won't wouldn't reach their goals by that date they disbanded themselves.



** ''The Feeding of the 5,000'' shows a drawing of a bombed out city in Ireland during UsefulNotes/TheTroubles.

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** ''The Feeding of the 5,000'' shows a drawing of a bombed out city in the north of Ireland during UsefulNotes/TheTroubles.



* HeroicBSOD: When Crass was recording ''Christ - The Album'', the Falklands war had begun and ended, causing the band to question their relevance as a political band. Fortunately, they pulled everything together and managed to come back with a vengeance...[[SubvertedTrope until their breakup in 1984]], [[DoubleSubversion however they were planning on breaking up in this year anyway, so...]]

to:

* HeroicBSOD: When Crass was recording ''Christ - The Album'', the Falklands war had begun and ended, causing the band to question their relevance as a political band. Fortunately, they pulled everything together and managed to come back with a vengeance...[[SubvertedTrope until their breakup in 1984]], 1984]. [[DoubleSubversion however However, they were planning on breaking up in this that year anyway, so...]]



** ''Stations of the Crass'' is a pun on the Catholic rite of the Stations of the Cross. It's also a reference to the graffiti campaign Crass had been conducting around London's underground railway system... including subway stations. The original cover artwork depicts an example of the band's graffiti.

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** ''Stations of the Crass'' is a pun on the Catholic rite of the Stations of the Cross. It's also a reference to the graffiti campaign Crass had been conducting around London's underground railway system... including subway underground stations. The original cover artwork depicts an example of the band's graffiti.


* TakeThat:
** Much like the ProtestSong example before it, most (if not all) of what Crass put out could count. For a specific example, however, the aforementioned two minutes of silence as a result of ExecutiveMeddling on ''The Feeding of the 5,000'' was titled "The Sound of Free Speech" as a jab towards the label and pressing plant that gave Crass grief over the track.

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* TakeThat:
TakeThat: Again, pretty much their entire discography contains one in some form or another.
** Much like the ProtestSong example before it, most (if not all) of what Crass put out could count. For a specific example, however, the The aforementioned two minutes of silence as a result of ExecutiveMeddling on ''The Feeding of the 5,000'' was titled "The Sound of Free Speech" as a jab towards the label and pressing plant that gave Crass grief over the track.


--> ''They Realized that their god was dead so they reclaimed power through the bomb instead''

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--> ''They Realized realized that their god was dead so they reclaimed power through the bomb instead''



** The album that song is on (''The Feeding of the 5,000'') begins and ends (if you don't count Asylum, that is) with "Do They Owe Us a Living?" and "Well?...Do They?" - which are different recordings of the ''exact same song''.

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** The album that song is on (''The Feeding of the 5,000'') begins and ends (if you don't count Asylum, "Asylum", that is) with "Do They Owe Us a Living?" and "Well?...Do They?" - which are different recordings of the ''exact same song''.



*** The following movement, a parody of the hardcore bands they were mocking here, was entitled "The Five Knuckle Shuffle" on the 2011 remaster (all movements were untitled on previous versions; note, however, that the movements are mistitled on the first disc of the remaster, referring to the indices of the original CD issue rather than the indices of the remaster. The titles are mostly correct on the second disc, with the exception of "Burying the Hatchet" being unlisted).

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*** The ::The following movement, a parody of the hardcore bands they were mocking here, was entitled "The Five Knuckle Shuffle" on the 2011 remaster (all movements were untitled on previous versions; note, however, that the movements are mistitled on the first disc of the remaster, referring to the indices of the original CD issue rather than the indices of the remaster. The titles are mostly correct on the second disc, with the exception of "Burying the Hatchet" being unlisted).



** Demoncrats is basically a poem about the futility of dying for god, patriotism, or democracy.

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** Demoncrats "Demoncrats" is basically a poem about the futility of dying for god, patriotism, or democracy.



''From those who have died for some others' privilege.''\\

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''From those who have died for some others' privilege.''\\
''



''Tease me, tease me, make me stay, in my red high-heels I can't get away!"''\\

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''Tease me, tease me, make me stay, in my red high-heels I can't get away!"''\\
away!"''



* PrecisionFStrike: Crass' use of profanity wasn't placed without thought, rather, it was quite deliberately placed in order to prove a point.

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* PrecisionFStrike: Crass' use of profanity wasn't placed without thought, thought; rather, it was quite deliberately placed in order to prove a point.



** Crass has also taken potshots at Music/TheSexPistols and Music/TheClash, whom they see as people who didn't live up to the punk spirit. The re-issues of all their albums in the 2010s have a quote by Johnny Rotten on each back cover: "I'm A Celebrity, Get Me Out Of Here!", referencing the fact that Rotten went on an episode of ''Series/ImACelebrityGetMeOutOfHere''.
** "Asylum" is notable for being such a vicious insult to Jesus Christ that workers refused to press ''The Feeding Of the 5000'' due to its blasphemous content.

to:

** Crass has also taken potshots at Music/TheSexPistols and Music/TheClash, whom they see as people who didn't live up to the punk spirit. The re-issues of all their albums in the 2010s have a quote by Johnny Rotten on each back cover: "I'm A a Celebrity, Get Me Out Of of Here!", referencing the fact that Rotten went on an episode of ''Series/ImACelebrityGetMeOutOfHere''.
** "Asylum" is notable for being such a vicious insult to Jesus Christ that workers refused to press ''The Feeding Of of the 5000'' due to its blasphemous content.



** "Systematic Death" comes from a similar perspective. From birth on the husband and wife the song focuses have been slaves to capitalism and to tradition. And when they're about to get their promised reward of being a pair of homeowners the system drops it's bomb, and they don't even get that.

to:

** "Systematic Death" comes from a similar perspective. From birth on the husband and wife the song focuses have been slaves to capitalism and to tradition. And when they're about to get their promised reward of being a pair of homeowners homeowners, the system drops it's bomb, its bomb and they don't even get that.





Formed in 1977 out of Dial House (an open-house community near Epping, Essex), Crass were an English PunkRock band that promoted [[UsefulNotes/{{Anarchism}} anarchy]] as a political ideology, a resistance movement, and a way of life, and attracted controversy multiple times through the duration of their career - even to the point of causing an international scandal. The band formed when Dial House founder Jeremy Ratter started jamming with then-resident Steven Williams (who took the names of Penny Rimbaud and Steve Ignorant, respectively) after the former saw a gig by Music/TheClash and was inspired by Joe Strummer telling his audience to start their own bands if they thought they could do better. Penny and Steve produced "Do They Owe Us a Living?" and "So What" as a drum and vocal duo, and chose the name Crass as a reference to a line [[note]] "the kids are just crass" [[/note]] in ''Music/TheRiseAndFallOfZiggyStardustAndTheSpidersFromMars'' by Music/DavidBowie.

to:

Formed in 1977 out of Dial House (an open-house community near Epping, Essex), Crass '''Crass''' were an English PunkRock band that promoted [[UsefulNotes/{{Anarchism}} anarchy]] as a political ideology, a resistance movement, and a way of life, and attracted controversy multiple times through the duration of their career - even to the point of causing an international scandal. The band formed when Dial House founder Jeremy Ratter started jamming with then-resident Steven Williams (who took the names of Penny Rimbaud and Steve Ignorant, respectively) after the former saw a gig by Music/TheClash and was inspired by Joe Strummer telling his audience to start their own bands if they thought they could do better. Penny and Steve produced "Do They Owe Us a Living?" and "So What" as a drum and vocal duo, and chose the name Crass as a reference to a line [[note]] "the kids are just crass" [[/note]] in ''Music/TheRiseAndFallOfZiggyStardustAndTheSpidersFromMars'' by Music/DavidBowie.


::The following movement, a parody of the hardcore bands they were mocking here, was entitled "The Five Knuckle Shuffle" on the 2011 remaster (all movements were untitled on previous versions; note, however, that the movements are mistitled on the first disc of the remaster, referring to the indices of the original CD issue rather than the indices of the remaster. The titles are mostly correct on the second disc, with the exception of "Burying the Hatchet" being unlisted).

to:

::The *** The following movement, a parody of the hardcore bands they were mocking here, was entitled "The Five Knuckle Shuffle" on the 2011 remaster (all movements were untitled on previous versions; note, however, that the movements are mistitled on the first disc of the remaster, referring to the indices of the original CD issue rather than the indices of the remaster. The titles are mostly correct on the second disc, with the exception of "Burying the Hatchet" being unlisted).


** ''Where Next Columbus''

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** ''Where "Where Next Columbus''Columbus?"



** ''Asylum''' is notable for being such a vicious insult to Jesus Christ that workers refused to press ''The Feeding Of the 5000'' due to its blasphemous content.

to:

** ''Asylum''' "Asylum" is notable for being such a vicious insult to Jesus Christ that workers refused to press ''The Feeding Of the 5000'' due to its blasphemous content.



** ''Systematic Death'' comes from a similar perspective. From birth on the husband and wife the song focuses have been slaves to capitalism and to tradition. And when they're about to get their promised reward of being a pair of homeowners the system drops it's bomb, and they don't even get that.

to:

** ''Systematic Death'' "Systematic Death" comes from a similar perspective. From birth on the husband and wife the song focuses have been slaves to capitalism and to tradition. And when they're about to get their promised reward of being a pair of homeowners the system drops it's bomb, and they don't even get that.

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** Most of their albums, really. ''Penis Envy'' lightens up their sound and includes exclusively female vocals; ''Christ: The Album'' engages in heavy GenreRoulette; ''Yes Sir, I Will'' is mostly a noise freakout; ''Ten Notes on a Summer's Day'' is AvantGardeMusic with no connection to punk.


* ThreeChordsAndTheTruth: While they were always rather avant-garde by punk standards, early material tends to play this relatively straight. By the time of ''Penis Envy'', ''Christ: The Album'', and ''Yes Sir, I Will'', however, they were definitely averting it or at most [[ZigZaggedTrope zig-zagging]] it.

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* ThreeChordsAndTheTruth: While they were always rather avant-garde by punk standards, early material tends to play this relatively straight. By the time of ''Penis Envy'', ''Christ: The Album'', and ''Yes Sir, I Will'', however, they were definitely averting it or at most [[ZigZaggedTrope zig-zagging]] it. Overall, they stand alongside Music/TheClash as one of the most experimental punk bands.

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