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* The ''Literature/CraftSequence'' is a novel series about economic crises and legal disputes... in a world where the economy and the lawyers are powered by magic. Resurrecting a dead god to restore the flow of his power across the globe = corporate bankruptcy proceeding and debt restructuring.

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* The ''Literature/CraftSequence'' is a novel series about economic crises and legal disputes... in a world where the economy and the lawyers are powered by magic. Resurrecting a dead god to restore the flow of his power across the globe = corporate bankruptcy proceeding and debt restructuring.restructuring.
* In ''Literature/DinosaurVs'', Dinosaur acts like he's competing against tough opponents, when really he's just doing things like making lemonade and jumping in leaves.


* Ernest Thayer's poem "Literature/CaseyAtTheBat". It tells the story of a baseball player [[ItWasHisSled striking out]] with all the gravitas of an epic.

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* Ernest Thayer's poem "Literature/CaseyAtTheBat". It tells the story of a minor-league baseball player [[ItWasHisSled striking out]] [[LastSecondShowoff thanks to his hubris]] with all the gravitas of an epic.


* In ''Literature/DreamPark'', Kasan Maibang gushes about how his people, the Daribi of New Guinea, finally mastered [[CargoCult the secret of Cargo]] when they learned about that most holy of liquids by which Europeans sanctify their rituals, honor their gods, and attain oneness with divine power. Said holy beverage is ''Coca-Cola''.

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* In ''Literature/DreamPark'', Kasan Maibang gushes about how his people, the Daribi of New Guinea, finally mastered [[CargoCult the secret of Cargo]] when they learned about that most holy of liquids by which Europeans sanctify their rituals, honor their gods, and attain oneness with divine power. Said holy beverage is ''Coca-Cola''.''Coca-Cola''.
* The ''Literature/CraftSequence'' is a novel series about economic crises and legal disputes... in a world where the economy and the lawyers are powered by magic. Resurrecting a dead god to restore the flow of his power across the globe = corporate bankruptcy proceeding and debt restructuring.


* A signature feature of Creator/NealStephenson's fiction is the grandiose, ridiculously detailed, and long digression describing some mundane or tedious activity. Examples include delivering a pizza (''Literature/SnowCrash'') and eating a bowl of cereal (''Literature/{{Cryptonomicon}}''). [[JustifiedTrope Angsting over pizza delivery in]] ''Snow Crash'' is because, [[SeriousBusiness if the pizza is delivered late]], [[ItMakesSenseInContext the Mafia]] [[ShootTheMessenger will shoot the Deliverator.]] And that if he's ''[[FateWorseThanDeath lucky]]'', because, let's face it: [[CoolOldGuy Uncle Enzo is pretty cool guy]], [[DisproportionateRetribution but]] [[MaximumFunChamber it's the]] [[CementShoes Mafia]].

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* A signature feature of Creator/NealStephenson's fiction is the grandiose, ridiculously detailed, and long digression describing some mundane or tedious activity. Examples include delivering a pizza (''Literature/SnowCrash'') and eating a bowl of cereal (''Literature/{{Cryptonomicon}}''). [[JustifiedTrope Angsting over pizza delivery in]] ''Snow Crash'' is because, [[SeriousBusiness if the pizza is delivered late]], [[ItMakesSenseInContext the Mafia]] [[ShootTheMessenger will shoot the Deliverator.]] And that if he's ''[[FateWorseThanDeath lucky]]'', because, let's face it: [[CoolOldGuy Uncle Enzo is pretty cool guy]], [[DisproportionateRetribution but]] [[MaximumFunChamber it's the]] [[CementShoes Mafia]]. But still: "the Deliverator".


** Carried over into the [[Film/TheHobbit first film]], as well. The scene was easily one of the most anticipated, and MartinFreeman's performance ''absolutely'' sells it.

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** Carried over into the [[Film/TheHobbit first film]], as well. The scene was easily one of the most anticipated, and MartinFreeman's Creator/MartinFreeman's performance ''absolutely'' sells it.


* The very last spell that we see Literature/HarryPotter cast at [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows the very end of the series]] is "Reparo", a mundane spell used for fixing broken objects. Doesn't seem like a fitting conclusion to the series? Well...it helps if you know that [[spoiler: he's casting it with the Elder Wand--the most powerful wand ever crafted--and he's using it to repair his broken holly-and-phoenix wand, which couldn't be fixed by any other wand]]. Still doesn't sound that awesome? Well, there's also the fact that [[spoiler: it's the ''only'' spell that he casts with the wand, and he does it to show that he doesn't want to claim the Elder Wand's power for himself--despite it being the most coveted Magical object in the history of the world]]. With that in mind, that "Reparo" ends up looking like one of Harry's most badass moves in the whole series, as it makes him [[spoiler: possibly the only Wizard ever to turn the Elder Wand down]].

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* ''Literature/HarryPotter'':
** In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' Harry muses at how impressive Dumbledore can make the simple act of walking through a door when the Headmaster strides through the castle's huge double doors after Professor Trelawney has been sacked in order to reassure her that Umbridge did not have the power to cast her out, and remind Umbridge.
**
The very last spell that we see Literature/HarryPotter cast at [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows the very end of the series]] is "Reparo", a mundane spell used for fixing broken objects. Doesn't seem like a fitting conclusion to the series? Well...it helps if you know that [[spoiler: he's casting it with the Elder Wand--the most powerful wand ever crafted--and he's using it to repair his broken holly-and-phoenix wand, which couldn't be fixed by any other wand]]. Still doesn't sound that awesome? Well, there's also the fact that [[spoiler: it's the ''only'' spell that he casts with the wand, and he does it to show that he doesn't want to claim the Elder Wand's power for himself--despite it being the most coveted Magical object in the history of the world]]. With that in mind, that "Reparo" ends up looking like one of Harry's most badass moves in the whole series, as it makes him [[spoiler: possibly the only Wizard ever to turn the Elder Wand down]].


** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', Rincewind learns that the Counterweight Continent's revolution was instigated by a book titled ''What I Did On My Holidays''. When he gets a chance to read said book, he finds that it describes rather ordinary things, but in a fiercely exciting manner. This is because the people of the Agatean Empire are so oppressed that the idea of a place where you can insult the local police and not be punished horribly or buy meat-like products at a discount is a wonder to behold. Rincewind sarcastically notes that the author clearly hasn't been to [[WretchedHive Ahnk-Morpork]] [[spoiler: and at that moment realizes that the author ''had'' been to Ahnk-Morpork; ''What I Did On My Holidays'' is ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'' and ''Discworld/TheLightFantastic'' from Twoflower's perspective!]]

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** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', Rincewind learns that the Counterweight Continent's revolution was instigated by a book titled ''What I Did On My Holidays''. When he gets a chance to read said book, he finds that it describes rather ordinary things, but in a fiercely exciting manner. This is because the people of the Agatean Empire are so oppressed that the idea of a place where you can insult the local police and not be punished horribly or buy meat-like products at a discount is a wonder to behold. Rincewind sarcastically notes that the author clearly hasn't been to [[WretchedHive Ahnk-Morpork]] Ankh-Morpork]] [[spoiler: and at that moment realizes that the author ''had'' been to Ahnk-Morpork; Ankh-Morpork; ''What I Did On My Holidays'' is ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'' and ''Discworld/TheLightFantastic'' from Twoflower's perspective!]]

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** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', Rincewind learns that the Counterweight Continent's revolution was instigated by a book titled ''What I Did On My Holidays''. When he gets a chance to read said book, he finds that it describes rather ordinary things, but in a fiercely exciting manner. This is because the people of the Agatean Empire are so oppressed that the idea of a place where you can insult the local police and not be punished horribly or buy meat-like products at a discount is a wonder to behold. Rincewind sarcastically notes that the author clearly hasn't been to [[WretchedHive Ahnk-Morpork]] [[spoiler: and at that moment realizes that the author ''had'' been to Ahnk-Morpork; ''What I Did On My Holidays'' is ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'' and ''Discworld/TheLightFantastic'' from Twoflower's perspective!]]

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--->'''Death''': [[AC:Stars explode, worlds collide, there's hardly anywhere in the universe where humans can live without being frozen or fried, and yet you believe that a bed is a... a normal thing.]]


* English poet Byron, back in the early 19th century, wrote [[SophisticatedAsHell this marvellous piece]] on the death of the hated Lord Castlereagh:

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* English poet Byron, [[Creator/LordByron Byron]], back in the early 19th century, wrote [[SophisticatedAsHell this marvellous piece]] on the death of the hated Lord Castlereagh:


* Crops up ''all the time'' [[PunctuatedForEmphasis All. The. Time]] in the ''Literature/VillageTales'' novels. Brewing real ale? Five thousand years of history and an epic of hops and barley. The workshop at the railway and the farrier at the forge? The alchemy of metal, hammer, and fire. Making bread i.e., ''solid'' beer? Part of a family tradition since King John's day, and parables of wheat and yeast. Digging up dirt? Welcome to the fascination of archaeology. Sheep on the downs? The history of England and the wool trade, a-hoof. It's the driving trope half the time.

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* Crops up ''all the time'' [[PunctuatedForEmphasis All. The. Time]] in the ''Literature/VillageTales'' novels. Brewing real ale? Five thousand years of history and an epic of hops and barley. The workshop at the railway and the farrier at the forge? The alchemy of metal, hammer, and fire. Making bread i.e., ''solid'' beer? Part of a family tradition since King John's day, and parables of wheat and yeast. Digging up dirt? Welcome to the fascination of archaeology. Sheep on the downs? The history of England and the wool trade, a-hoof. It's the driving trope half the time.time.
* In ''Literature/DreamPark'', Kasan Maibang gushes about how his people, the Daribi of New Guinea, finally mastered [[CargoCult the secret of Cargo]] when they learned about that most holy of liquids by which Europeans sanctify their rituals, honor their gods, and attain oneness with divine power. Said holy beverage is ''Coca-Cola''.


* The very last spell that we see Literature/HarryPotter cast at [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows the very end of the series]] is "Reparo", a mundane spell used for fixing broken objects. Doesn't seem like a fitting conclusion to the series? Well...it helps if you know that [[spoiler: he's casting it with the Elder Wand--the most powerful wand ever crafted--and he's using it to repair his broken holly-and-phoenix wand, which couldn't be fixed by any other wand]]. Still doesn't sound that awesome? Well, there's also the fact that [[spoiler: it's the ''only'' spell that he casts with the wand, and he does it to show that he doesn't want to claim the Elder Wand's power for himself--despite it being the most coveted Magical object in the history of the world]]. With that in mind, that "Reparo" ends up looking like one of Harry's most {{Badass}} moves in the whole series, as it makes him [[spoiler: possibly the only Wizard ever to turn the Elder Wand down]].

to:

* The very last spell that we see Literature/HarryPotter cast at [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows the very end of the series]] is "Reparo", a mundane spell used for fixing broken objects. Doesn't seem like a fitting conclusion to the series? Well...it helps if you know that [[spoiler: he's casting it with the Elder Wand--the most powerful wand ever crafted--and he's using it to repair his broken holly-and-phoenix wand, which couldn't be fixed by any other wand]]. Still doesn't sound that awesome? Well, there's also the fact that [[spoiler: it's the ''only'' spell that he casts with the wand, and he does it to show that he doesn't want to claim the Elder Wand's power for himself--despite it being the most coveted Magical object in the history of the world]]. With that in mind, that "Reparo" ends up looking like one of Harry's most {{Badass}} badass moves in the whole series, as it makes him [[spoiler: possibly the only Wizard ever to turn the Elder Wand down]].


* In "Literature/WarriorCats" Jayfeather [[spoiler: breaks his beloved stick.]] It is the most dramatic scene about [[spoiler: stick-breaking]] you will ever read in fiction.

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* In "Literature/WarriorCats" Jayfeather [[spoiler: breaks his beloved stick.]] It is the most dramatic scene about [[spoiler: stick-breaking]] you will ever read in fiction.fiction.
* Crops up ''all the time'' [[PunctuatedForEmphasis All. The. Time]] in the ''Literature/VillageTales'' novels. Brewing real ale? Five thousand years of history and an epic of hops and barley. The workshop at the railway and the farrier at the forge? The alchemy of metal, hammer, and fire. Making bread i.e., ''solid'' beer? Part of a family tradition since King John's day, and parables of wheat and yeast. Digging up dirt? Welcome to the fascination of archaeology. Sheep on the downs? The history of England and the wool trade, a-hoof. It's the driving trope half the time.


* English poet Alexander Pope wrote ''TheRapeOfTheLock'' as a satirical, thinly fictionalized account of a contemporary society scandal, in mock-heroic, ludicrously overblown '''''EPIC VERSE'''''. He did this to both point out how ''utterly stupid'' it was to make a scandal out of the incident in question, and parody the MundaneMadeAwesome tendencies of his contemporaries.

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* English poet Alexander Pope wrote ''TheRapeOfTheLock'' ''Literature/TheRapeOfTheLock'' as a satirical, thinly fictionalized account of a contemporary society scandal, in mock-heroic, ludicrously overblown '''''EPIC VERSE'''''. He did this to both point out how ''utterly stupid'' it was to make a scandal out of the incident in question, and parody the MundaneMadeAwesome tendencies of his contemporaries.



* Florian and the otters in the ''{{Redwall}}'' book ''Marlfox'' perform a [[ShowWithinAShow Play Within A Book]] detailing a Duel of Insults. The characters hurl verbal abuse at each other and react as if wounded when their opponent makes a particularly [[IncrediblyLamePun cutting remark]].

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* Florian and the otters in the ''{{Redwall}}'' ''Literature/{{Redwall}}'' book ''Marlfox'' perform a [[ShowWithinAShow Play Within A Book]] detailing a Duel of Insults. The characters hurl verbal abuse at each other and react as if wounded when their opponent makes a particularly [[IncrediblyLamePun cutting remark]].


* The very last spell that we see Literature/HarryPotter cast at [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows the very end of the series]] is "Reparo", a mundane spell used for fixing broken objects. Doesn't seem like a fitting conclusion to the series? Well...it helps if you know that [[spoiler: he's casting it with the Elder Wand--the most powerful wand ever crafted--and he's using it to repair his broken holly-and-phoenix wand, which couldn't be fixed by any other wand]]. Still doesn't sound that awesome? Well, there's also the fact that [[spoiler: it's the ''only'' spell that he casts with the wand, and he does it to show that he doesn't want to claim the Elder Wand's power for himself--despite it being the most coveted Magical object in the history of the world]]. With that in mind, that "Reparo" ends up looking like one of Harry's most {{Badass}} moves in the whole series, as it makes him [[spoiler: possibly the only Wizard ever to turn the Elder Wand down]].

to:

* The very last spell that we see Literature/HarryPotter cast at [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows the very end of the series]] is "Reparo", a mundane spell used for fixing broken objects. Doesn't seem like a fitting conclusion to the series? Well...it helps if you know that [[spoiler: he's casting it with the Elder Wand--the most powerful wand ever crafted--and he's using it to repair his broken holly-and-phoenix wand, which couldn't be fixed by any other wand]]. Still doesn't sound that awesome? Well, there's also the fact that [[spoiler: it's the ''only'' spell that he casts with the wand, and he does it to show that he doesn't want to claim the Elder Wand's power for himself--despite it being the most coveted Magical object in the history of the world]]. With that in mind, that "Reparo" ends up looking like one of Harry's most {{Badass}} moves in the whole series, as it makes him [[spoiler: possibly the only Wizard ever to turn the Elder Wand down]].down]].
*In "Literature/WarriorCats" Jayfeather [[spoiler: breaks his beloved stick.]] It is the most dramatic scene about [[spoiler: stick-breaking]] you will ever read in fiction.

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