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* ''Literature/Ra'' [[spoiler:lies on the more speculative end of the spectrum, with the "magic" relying on a combination of extreme levels of quantum energy teleportation on a scale far beyond anything considered in reality combined with advanced nanotechnology.]]

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* ''Literature/Ra'' [[spoiler:lies ''Literature/{{Ra}}'' lies on the more speculative end of the spectrum, with the "magic" relying on a combination of extreme levels of quantum energy teleportation on a scale far beyond anything considered in reality combined with advanced nanotechnology.]]



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* Though ''Anime/MoonlightMile'' depicts [[SpaceIsNoisy sound]] and [[ExplosionsInSpace explosions in space]] for the [[RuleOfCool Rule of Cool]], most of the rest is plausible and solid science.
* ''Manga/{{Planetes}}'' details [[SliceOfLife life and work]] [[RecycledInSpace in space]] in [[BoringButPractical the most realistic and scientific manner]]. Space is quiet and without explosions, but anime makes great use of music in place of sound effects.
* Though premise is teenage girls in [[LatexSpacesuit skintight space suits]] riding rockets to space, ''Anime/RocketGirls'' is [[{{Pun}} solid rocket science]]. And those skintight space suits [[ScienceMarchesOn may become reality]] soon enough.

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* Military sci-fi thriller ''Literature/{{Victoria}}'' has no technology that breaks the known laws of physics (though some, like commercially useful cold fusion, reach toward the speculative). The military hardware featured for the most part either exists today, or consists of plausible next-generation concepts (when it's not recycled outright ''[[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece old]]'' stuff). Biotechnology is somewhat more advanced than might be strictly plausible for the story's 2030s date, ranging from engineered super-plagues to cheap and easy [[UterineReplicator ectogenesis]], but still nothing that is impossible.


* ''Ra'' [[spoiler:lies on the more speculative end of the spectrum, with the "magic" relying on a combination of extreme levels of quantum energy teleportation on a scale far beyond anything considered in reality combined with advanced nanotechnology.]]

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* ''Ra'' ''Literature/Ra'' [[spoiler:lies on the more speculative end of the spectrum, with the "magic" relying on a combination of extreme levels of quantum energy teleportation on a scale far beyond anything considered in reality combined with advanced nanotechnology.]]


* ''Literature/Ra'' [[spoiler:lies on the more speculative end of the spectrum, with the "magic" relying on a combination of extreme levels of quantum energy teleportation on a scale far beyond anything considered in reality combined with advanced nanotechnology.]]

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* ''Literature/Ra'' ''Ra'' [[spoiler:lies on the more speculative end of the spectrum, with the "magic" relying on a combination of extreme levels of quantum energy teleportation on a scale far beyond anything considered in reality combined with advanced nanotechnology.]]

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* ''Literature/Ra'' [[spoiler:lies on the more speculative end of the spectrum, with the "magic" relying on a combination of extreme levels of quantum energy teleportation on a scale far beyond anything considered in reality combined with advanced nanotechnology.]]


* ΔV: Rings of Saturn is one of the most accurate depictions of space travel in visual media, which spacecraft systems, performance and visuals being closely extrapolated from existing and near-future speculative tech. The only thing bringing it above straight Futorology is [[spoiler: alien technology, including a wormhole hidden inside Daphnis.]]

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* ΔV: Rings of Saturn is one of the most accurate depictions of space travel in visual media, which with spacecraft systems, performance and visuals being closely extrapolated from existing and near-future speculative tech. The only thing bringing it above straight Futorology is [[spoiler: alien technology, including a wormhole hidden inside Daphnis.]]



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* ΔV: Rings of Saturn is one of the most accurate depictions of space travel in visual media, which spacecraft systems, performance and visuals being closely extrapolated from existing and near-future speculative tech. The only thing bringing it above straight Futorology is [[spoiler: alien technology, including a wormhole hidden inside Daphnis.]]


* Military sci-fi thriller ''Literature/{{Victoria}}'' has no technology that breaks the known laws of physics (though some, like commercially useful cold fusion, reach toward the speculative). The military hardware featured for the most part either exists today, or consists of plausible next-generation concepts (when it's not recycled outright ''[[BreakOutTheMuseumPiece old]]'' stuff). Biotechnology is somewhat more advanced than might be strictly plausible for the story's 2030s date, ranging from engineered super-plagues to cheap and easy [[UterineReplicator ectogenesis]], but still nothing that is impossible.



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* ''Film/AdAstra'' has a few instances of [[ArtisticLicensePhysics playing loose with physics]], particularly regarding antimatter and gravity, but otherwise doesn't stray too far from near-future technology. [[spoiler:One hard sci-fi aspect is [[AbsentAliens claiming there is no life outside Earth]].]]



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* ''Paradyzja'' by Creator/JanuszZajdel is an interesting example. At first glance, an orbital city with CentrifugalGravity is pretty hard, but not that hard - but then we learn [[spoiler: the city is really located on the surface of the planet, and its inhabitants are purposefully ''taught physics wrong'' so they never work it out and can continue to be abused by their lords and masters]]. A spy from Earth confirms this little fact experimentally, by checking for Coriolis forces.



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* It can be difficult to see it this way because it was only "fiction" for a couple of years, but ''Film/TheTrumanShow'' actually fits neatly into the category of Futurology, as well as the third of AsimovsThreeKindsOfScienceFiction.



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* Season 1 of ''Series/The100'' fits here. Aside from a weird snake/eel/worm monster that appeared in the {{Pilot}} (and [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness only in the Pilot]]), and some acid fog that's given a reasonable-ish explanation in Season 2, the only speculative leaps required are that a nuclear war has occurred, and that humanity has built a (barely) self-sustaining space station with CentrifugalGravity. Later seasons introduce a ''lot'' more {{Phlebotinum}} and breaks from known science.


* ''Literature/AlienInASmallTown'' goes into considerable detail about its [[SiliconBasedLife Silicon-Baed Life Forms,]] and has no FasterThanLightTravel, HumanoidAliens or any of the other usual soft science culprits.

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* ''Literature/AlienInASmallTown'' goes into considerable detail about its [[SiliconBasedLife Silicon-Baed Silicon-Based Life Forms,]] and has no FasterThanLightTravel, HumanoidAliens or any of the other usual soft science culprits.


* ''Literature/RedMars'' by Creator/KimStanleyRobinson, (as well as much of his other work) reads like genuine prophesy. Every single tool in ''Red Mars'' is carefully researched.

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* ''Literature/RedMars'' by Creator/KimStanleyRobinson, (as well as much of his other work) reads like genuine prophesy. Every single tool in ''Red Mars'' is carefully researched. Well, with the exception of [[spoiler: the longevity treatment, for which we are given almost no scientific explanation. It's there purely as a literary device to keep the main cast around longer while things continue to change on Mars.]]

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