Follow TV Tropes

Following

History Manga / Batman

Go To



In the mid-1960s, the ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series was exported to Japan and proved extremely popular. As a result, an officially licensed ''Batman'' manga was published for just over a year, in the weekly ''Shōnen King'' magazine and, with different stories, in the monthly ''Shōnen Gaho''. Jiro Kuwata, an established mangaka of superhero and "scientific detective" manga, was hired as writer and artist. The manga was loosely based on DC ''Batman'' stories of the era, but with significant AdaptationExpansion and CulturalTranslation. After the end of Japanese Bat-mania, the series was largely forgotten.

to:

In the mid-1960s, the ''Series/{{Batman}}'' ''Series/{{Batman|1966}}'' TV series was exported to Japan and proved extremely popular. As a result, an officially licensed ''Batman'' manga was published for just over a year, in the weekly ''Shōnen King'' magazine and, with different stories, in the monthly ''Shōnen Gaho''. Jiro Kuwata, an established mangaka of superhero and "scientific detective" manga, was hired as writer and artist. The manga was loosely based on DC ''Batman'' stories of the era, but with significant AdaptationExpansion and CulturalTranslation. After the end of Japanese Bat-mania, the series was largely forgotten.

Added DiffLines:

* ThinlyVeiledDubCountryChange: While it's a Batman-themed property, everything is set in Japan. Instances you see are Japanese language signs, security guards having armbands[[note]]Although there are uniformed ones[[/note]] and notes are written in Japanese.


** Fittingly, he also appears in ''Batman '66'', the 2010s comic based on the ''Batman'' show.

to:

** Fittingly, he also appears in ''Batman '66'', ''ComicBook/Batman66'', the 2010s comic based on the ''Batman'' show.

Added DiffLines:

* GimmickMatches: A "loser unmasks" wrestling match happens at the climax of "The Hangman of Terror".

Added DiffLines:

***If you go by cover dates of the original magazines, Clayface's origin (Shonen Gahou 1966 #9, 9/1/1966) would go between "Professor Gorilla part 3 " (Shonen King 1966 #34, 8/28/1966) and "Go-Go the Magician part 1" (Shonen King 1966 #35, 9/4/1966).


** For those curious, "The Crimes of the Planet King" was the last of the weekly stories printed in Shonen King. All of the stories collected after that (starting with "The Robot Robbers") were printed in the monthly magazine Shonen Gahou at the same time as the weekly stories. The result is that Clayface's origin is printed in volume 3 of the collected edition while his return is printed in volume 2.

to:

** For those curious, "The Crimes of the Planet King" was the last of the weekly stories printed originally published in Shonen King. All of the stories collected after that (starting with "The Robot Robbers") were printed originally appeared in the monthly magazine Shonen Gahou at the same time as the weekly stories. The result is that Clayface's origin is printed in volume 3 of the collected edition while his return is printed in volume 2.

Added DiffLines:

**For those curious, "The Crimes of the Planet King" was the last of the weekly stories printed in Shonen King. All of the stories collected after that (starting with "The Robot Robbers") were printed in the monthly magazine Shonen Gahou at the same time as the weekly stories. The result is that Clayface's origin is printed in volume 3 of the collected edition while his return is printed in volume 2.


* CulturalTranslation: Lord Death Man refers to himself as a/the "god of death" (死神) several times in Japanese. This became a "a death lord" in the English translation.

to:

* CulturalTranslation: Lord Death Man refers to himself as a/the "god of death" (死神) several times in Japanese. This became a "a death lord" in the English translation.

Added DiffLines:

*CulturalTranslation: Lord Death Man refers to himself as a/the "god of death" (死神) several times in Japanese. This became a "a death lord" in the English translation.


Added DiffLines:

*DubNameChange: Clayface became ドロ人間 ("Mud Human") in the manga, and Weather Wizard was renamed "Go-Go the Magician" (魔人ゴーゴー) even in the English translation.


Added DiffLines:

*RecursiveTranslation: The character Death-Man became 死神男 (literally "Death-God Man") in the manga, which the English translation rendered as "Lord Death Man." Similarly, the obscure American character "Dr. No-Face" became "Dr. Faceless" in the English manga translation.
**This also applied to story titles. For example, the original Batman comics featured a story titled "The Man Who Quit the Human Race." The English translation of the manga adaptation became "The Man Who Quit Being Human."


* MonsterHeel: The Hangman, in-universe, is a brutally unstoppable wrestling heel.


Added DiffLines:

* WrestlingMonster: The Hangman, in-universe, is a brutally unstoppable wrestling heel.


In the mid-1960s, the ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series was exported to Japan and proved extremely popular. As a result, an officially licensed ''Batman'' manga was published for just over a year in ''Shōnen King'' magazine. Jiro Kuwata, an established mangaka of superhero and "scientific detective" manga, was hired as writer and artist. The manga was loosely based on DC ''Batman'' stories of the era, but with significant AdaptationExpansion and CulturalTranslation. After the end of Japanese Bat-mania, the series was largely forgotten.

to:

In the mid-1960s, the ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series was exported to Japan and proved extremely popular. As a result, an officially licensed ''Batman'' manga was published for just over a year year, in the weekly ''Shōnen King'' magazine.magazine and, with different stories, in the monthly ''Shōnen Gaho''. Jiro Kuwata, an established mangaka of superhero and "scientific detective" manga, was hired as writer and artist. The manga was loosely based on DC ''Batman'' stories of the era, but with significant AdaptationExpansion and CulturalTranslation. After the end of Japanese Bat-mania, the series was largely forgotten.



* AdaptationalHeroism: Karmak the gorilla is considerably more sympathetic than his inspiration Gorilla Grodd, being a mistreated lab animal who accidentally had his intelligence augmented and decided to seek revenge on humanity. After he's depowered, Batman feels sympathy for him and has him shipped back to Africa to be released into the wild. Grodd, on the other hand, is naturally intelligent, and his usual motivation rarely rises above "[[ForTheEvulz he's a horrible asshole]]".

to:

* AdaptationalHeroism: Karmak the gorilla is considerably more sympathetic than his inspiration Gorilla Grodd, being a mistreated lab animal who accidentally had his intelligence augmented and decided AlienAbduction: Happens to seek revenge on humanity. After he's depowered, Batman feels sympathy for him and has him shipped back to Africa to be released into Robin at the wild. Grodd, on the other hand, is naturally intelligent, and his usual motivation rarely rises above "[[ForTheEvulz he's a horrible asshole]]".beginning of "Duel In Space".



* ArtisticLicensePhysics: In the most glaring example, one of Dr. Quras's robots being struck by lightning somehow causes the lightning current to travel back through the radio waves used to control the robot, and kill Quras and his two remaining criminal servants.



* CaptainErsatz:
** Go Go the Magician is an Ersatz of ''ComicBook/TheFlash'' villain the Weather Wizard.
** Karmak the gorilla is an Ersatz of another ''Flash'' villain, Gorilla Grodd.

to:

* CaptainErsatz:
**
CaptainErsatz: Go Go the Magician is an Ersatz of ''ComicBook/TheFlash'' villain the Weather Wizard.
** Karmak
Wizard, whose unusual confrontation with Batman was adapted into the gorilla is an Ersatz of another ''Flash'' villain, Gorilla Grodd.manga.



* CostumeCopycat: Both "The Robbery Contest" and "The Phantom Batman" involve criminals impersonating Batman. In the first example, Batman himself ends up impersonating the impersonator.



* ForgottenPhlebotinum: Planet King invents a series of incredible planet-themed super-science weapons and only uses them for one crime each.
* GenreShift: "Duel in Space" makes a Genre Shift into space opera.
* GladiatorGames: The evil alien emperor in "Duel in Space" abducts intelligent aliens from different planets and forces them to battle in a huge arena.



* IntangibleMan: The criminal holograms created by Dr. Donovan are intangible apart from their hands.
* KarmicDeath: The evil alien emperor accidentally falls into the beast pit that he intended to throw the losing duellists into to be [[FedToTheBeast eaten]].
* KillItWithFire: The fate of Catman when his "magic" cloak catches alight.



* MirrorMoralityMachine: A flawed MadScience resurrection turns non other than Alfred into the disfigured supervillain The Outsider, with his previous loyalty to Bruce and Dick turned into an uncontrollable desire to kill them.

to:

* MaybeMagicMaybeMundane: The manga leaves it unclear whether Catman's magic cloak really made him immortal (Robin's belief) or whether he repeatedly survived fatal situations by pure luck (Batman's).
* MirrorMoralityMachine: A flawed MadScience resurrection turns non none other than Alfred into the disfigured supervillain The Outsider, with his previous loyalty to Bruce and Dick turned into an uncontrollable desire to kill them.



* OutOfOrder: Due to the decision to print all the weekly stories before all the monthly ones, the translated version has the two Clayface stories (the only two stories to feature a recurring villain) in reverse order.



* PuppeteerParasite: The alien entity that caused Dr. Norbett to commit crimes as Planet King.



* RemoteBody: Doctor Quras creates super-powered remote controlled robots and recruits criminals to control them to commit crimes.



* SpiceUpTheSubtitles: The English translation has Batman refer to Planet King as "a pain in the... asteroids", a rather crude pun that seems out of character for the way he is depicted in the rest of the manga.




to:

* YouHaveFailedMe: Doctor Quras shoots "Four-Eyes" Hawley for letting one of the robots get destroyed.


* InsanityDefence: This is [[spoiler:Morgan's reason for pretending to be Dr. Denton, driven mad by his disfigurement]], as he believes that it will allow him to get away with his crimes.

to:

* InsanityDefence: InsanityDefense: This is [[spoiler:Morgan's reason for pretending to be Dr. Denton, driven mad by his disfigurement]], as he believes that it will allow him to get away with his crimes.


In the mid-1960s, the ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series was exported to Japan and proved extremely popular. As a result, an officially licensed ''Batman'' manga was published for just over a year in ''Shōnen King'' magazine. Jiro Kuwata, an established mangaka of superhero and "scientific detective" manga, was hired as writer and artist. The manga was loosely based on DC characters, and at times on individual DC stories, but the scripts and art were completely new. After the end of Japanese Bat-mania, the series was largely forgotten.

to:

In the mid-1960s, the ''Series/{{Batman}}'' TV series was exported to Japan and proved extremely popular. As a result, an officially licensed ''Batman'' manga was published for just over a year in ''Shōnen King'' magazine. Jiro Kuwata, an established mangaka of superhero and "scientific detective" manga, was hired as writer and artist. The manga was loosely based on DC characters, ''Batman'' stories of the era, but with significant AdaptationExpansion and at times on individual DC stories, but the scripts and art were completely new.CulturalTranslation. After the end of Japanese Bat-mania, the series was largely forgotten.


* BreakoutVillain: Lord Death Man became this after his complete story was published in ''Bat-Manga'', to the point that he achieved CanonImmigrant status to ''Batman Incorporated''.

to:

* BreakoutVillain: Lord Death Man Man, the manga's interpretation of a one-shot Silver Age villain called Death-Man, became this after his complete story was published in ''Bat-Manga'', to the point that he achieved CanonImmigrant status to ''Batman Incorporated''.Incorporated'' introduced him as Death-Man's Post-Crisis counterpart.

Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_batmanga_1.jpg]]


Added DiffLines:



Added DiffLines:

Showing 15 edit(s) of 37

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report