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* This same attitude rears its ugly head in ''FanFic/LadyBugOut'', to the point that Chat grabs Ladybug and launches into an angry, blistering rant blaming her for all their problems:
--->'''Chat:''' "Why are you trying to ruin what we have together?! We're meant to be! The ladybug and the cat! ''Ladybug and Chat Noir!'' What do you have against ''destiny?!'' We're partners; ''special'' partners! We were ''chosen!'' We're ''soulmates!'' What's so hard about that?"
** This sparks off a ReasonYouSuckSpeech where Ladybug calls out his ItsAllAboutMe attitude, and is also what leads to him [[spoiler:losing the Black Cat Miraculous]].


* In the ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' fanfic A Rose And A Thorn 4, Project: Mirage goes back in time to try and stop Ashura from causing the fall of the ARK. It turns out that BECAUSE she did this while knowing what was going to happen, she made Sonic blue, and gave birth to [[spoiler:Knuckles]]. The experiment she mated with fell in love with her ''because'' she was so determined to change things, and then released the Artificial Chaos ''because'' he'd been told it would happen (assuming that it would happen with or without him). She still couldn't save Maria even though she knew about it, but kept Shadow from being shot, and heard Maria's last words (as named in ''VideoGame/SonicBattle'').

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* In the ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' fanfic A ''A Rose And A Thorn 4, 4'', Project: Mirage goes back in time to try and stop Ashura from causing the fall of the ARK. It turns out that BECAUSE she did this while knowing what was going to happen, she made Sonic blue, and gave birth to [[spoiler:Knuckles]]. The experiment she mated with fell in love with her ''because'' she was so determined to change things, and then released the Artificial Chaos ''because'' he'd been told it would happen (assuming that it would happen with or without him). She still couldn't save Maria even though she knew about it, but kept Shadow from being shot, and heard Maria's last words (as named in ''VideoGame/SonicBattle'').



* FanFic/TheInfiniteLoops: ''Belief'' that this is true is a possible cause of Setsuna Syndrome, wherein the person attempts to [[{{Railroading}} railroad]] canon events into place. This usually places them at odds with most other loopers, who tend to cause severe timeline changes out of boredom.

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* FanFic/TheInfiniteLoops: ''FanFic/TheInfiniteLoops'': ''Belief'' that this is true is a possible cause of Setsuna Syndrome, wherein the person attempts to [[{{Railroading}} railroad]] canon events into place. This usually places them at odds with most other loopers, who tend to cause severe timeline changes out of boredom.


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* Adrien/Chat Noir takes this attitude towards his relationship with Ladybug in ''FanFic/LeaveForMendeleiev''. He's convinced that because the Ladybug and the Black Cat are 'meant to be partners', they're ''destined'' to be together, to the point that when Ladybug's rightfully enraged at him for lying about their relationship and helping spread rumors that they're dating, he outright refuses to apologize and tells her that there's no point in her denying it: they '''are''' going to be together someday. So why does she keep resisting...?

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* ''Franchise/WonderWoman'':
** ''ComicBook/WonderWoman1987'': Hippolyta learns that Wonder Woman is prophesied to die, so she arranges things so that her daughter is stripped of the title and ComicBook/{{Artemis}} becomes the new Wonder Woman. In the end this ensures that [[ProphecyTwist both Diana and Artemis die]]. (They get better).
** ComicBook/WonderGirl Cassie Sandsmark is told repeatedly by her half brother ComicBook/{{Hercules|Unbound}} that she can't alter her fate of serving and protecting their father Zeus. Her ScrewDestiny goes much better than Hippolyta's, but Zeus does manage to manipulate her actions far more than she's like anyway.


* Lia Marie Johnson's song "DNA" explains how some kids in bad families wind up being just like their parents. The singer is a child telling an alcoholic, possibly incarcerated parent that (s)he's determined not to become them. But the last line of the chorus suggests that it's exactly what (s)he's doomed to become regardless of what she tries.

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* Lia Marie Johnson's song "DNA" explains how some kids in bad families wind up being just like their parents. The singer is a child telling an alcoholic, possibly incarcerated parent that (s)he's they're determined not to become them. them when they grow up. But the last line of the chorus suggests that it's [[spoiler:the child is exactly what (s)he's doomed to become the bad parent, regardless of what she tries.they try to avoid it.]]


But you can't stop DNA\\

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But you can't stop DNA\\DNA...''

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* Lia Marie Johnson's song "DNA" explains how some kids in bad families wind up being just like their parents. The singer is a child telling an alcoholic, possibly incarcerated parent that (s)he's determined not to become them. But the last line of the chorus suggests that it's exactly what (s)he's doomed to become regardless of what she tries.
-->''I won't be, no, I won't be like you\\
Fighting back, I'm fighting back the truth\\
Eyes like yours can't look away\\
But you can't stop DNA\\


** An episode of the [[Series/TheTwilightZone2002 2002 series]] did an episode of the "killing Hitler" kind of plot. [[spoiler: The main character goes back in time to when Hitler was an infant and succeeds in killing him then, but then the baby's nanny finds another child and that's passed off as Hitler.]]



** Averted when Undertaker was defeated by Brock lesnar at Wrestlemania 30 thus ending the Streak. Undertaker would be defeated a second time by Roman Reigns at Wrestlemania 33 before retiring.

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** Averted when Undertaker was defeated by Brock lesnar Lesnar at Wrestlemania 30 thus ending the Streak. Undertaker would be defeated a second time by Roman Reigns at Wrestlemania 33 before retiring.


* In ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' during the trek across the intensely hot Nefud Desert to Aqaba, one of Prince Faisal's men, Gasim falls off his camel during the night. Ali says it's too late to go back and that it is "Written" that he die. Lawrence goes back and saves him proving "Nothing is written!" Later, after they forge an alliance with the tribe of Auda Abu Tayi, one of his men is killed one of Faisal's. Lawrence decides to settle the dispute and save the alliance by killing the guilty man. It turns out to be Gasim. Lawrence then has to execute him with a pistol. Afterwards, when Auda asks Ali why Lawrence is upset, he tells him he brought the man he killed out of the Nefud. "Ah," Auda says, "It was written, then."

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* In ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia'' during the trek across the intensely hot Nefud Desert to Aqaba, one of Prince Faisal's men, Gasim falls off his camel during the night. Ali says it's too late to go back and that it is "Written" that he die. Lawrence goes back and saves him proving "Nothing is written!" Later, after they forge an alliance with the tribe of Auda Abu Tayi, one of his men is killed by one of Faisal's. Lawrence decides to settle the dispute and save the alliance by killing the guilty man. It turns out to be Gasim. Lawrence then has to execute him with a pistol. Afterwards, when Auda asks Ali why Lawrence is upset, he tells him he brought the man he killed out of the Nefud. "Ah," Auda says, "It was written, then."


* In the ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' fanfic A Rose And A Thorn 4, Project: Mirage goes back in time to try and stop Ashura from causing the fall of the ARK. It turns out that BECAUSE she did this while knowing what was going to happen, she made Sonic blue, and gave birth to [[spoiler:Knuckles]]. The experiment she mated with fell in love with her ''because'' she was so determined to change things, and then released the Artificial Chaos ''because'' he'd been told it would happen (assuming that it would happen with or without him). She still couldn't save Maria even though she knew about it, but kept Shadow from being shot, and heard Maria's last words (as named in ''SonicBattle'').

to:

* In the ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' fanfic A Rose And A Thorn 4, Project: Mirage goes back in time to try and stop Ashura from causing the fall of the ARK. It turns out that BECAUSE she did this while knowing what was going to happen, she made Sonic blue, and gave birth to [[spoiler:Knuckles]]. The experiment she mated with fell in love with her ''because'' she was so determined to change things, and then released the Artificial Chaos ''because'' he'd been told it would happen (assuming that it would happen with or without him). She still couldn't save Maria even though she knew about it, but kept Shadow from being shot, and heard Maria's last words (as named in ''SonicBattle'').''VideoGame/SonicBattle'').


* In the ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' fanfic A Rose And A Thorn 4, Project: Mirage goes back in time to try and stop Ashura from causing the fall of the ARK. It turns out that BECAUSE she did this while knowing what was going to happen, she made Sonic blue, and gave birth to [[spoiler:Knuckles]]. The experiment she mated with caused the rampage of the Artificial Chaos because she told him it was going to happen. She still couldn't save Maria even though she knew about it and was right there. But then, she had just been shot...

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* In the ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' fanfic A Rose And A Thorn 4, Project: Mirage goes back in time to try and stop Ashura from causing the fall of the ARK. It turns out that BECAUSE she did this while knowing what was going to happen, she made Sonic blue, and gave birth to [[spoiler:Knuckles]]. The experiment she mated with caused the rampage of fell in love with her ''because'' she was so determined to change things, and then released the Artificial Chaos because she ''because'' he'd been told him it was going to happen. would happen (assuming that it would happen with or without him). She still couldn't save Maria even though she knew about it it, but kept Shadow from being shot, and was right there. But then, she had just been shot...heard Maria's last words (as named in ''SonicBattle'').

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* In ''VideoGame/TheWhisperedWorld'', the main character Sadwick is shocked and bewildered when he receives a prophecy from a forest oracle, foretelling that he will be responsible for the end of the world. As Sadwick is actually [[spoiler: the subconscious of a comatose boy, and his world is just a figment of his imagination]], this comes to pass at the end of the game.


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-->'''Charles'': You can't change the rules--nobody can--they've got it all fixed. It's a rotten system--but what are you going to do about it?

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-->'''Charles'': -->'''Charles:''' You can't change the rules--nobody can--they've got it all fixed. It's a rotten system--but what are you going to do about it?



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[[folder:Web Originals]]Animation]]



* In ''WebVideo/TheEnd'', whenever Brendon meets someone new he receives a vision of the end of that relationship and he cannot change what he sees. His only choices are to accept fate or not to pursue that relationship at all.
* In WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic's editorial on ''Film/{{Unbreakable}}'', he discusses the darker side of this, asking about the people who hadn't wanted to be mean and the people destined to be victims.
* In the WebOriginal/KingDragonCanon, Dennis plays a Telltale-Games-esque version of the game, but due to a PlotlineDeath in the original, a certain choice reeks of ButThouMust (Much to his dismay.)



[[folder:Web Videos]]
* In ''WebVideo/TheEnd'', whenever Brendon meets someone new he receives a vision of the end of that relationship and he cannot change what he sees. His only choices are to accept fate or not to pursue that relationship at all.
* In WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic's editorial on ''Film/{{Unbreakable}}'', he discusses the darker side of this, asking about the people who hadn't wanted to be mean and the people destined to be victims.
* In ''WebVideo/TheKingDragonCanon, Dennis plays a Telltale-Games-esque version of the game, but due to a PlotlineDeath in the original, a certain choice reeks of ButThouMust (Much to his dismay.)
[[/folder]]



* In ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', Odd's [[WhatKindofLamePowerIsHeartAnyway very useful]] ability to see the future provided endless examples of this. The first season seemed pretty convinced that his real superpower was watching things like [[spoiler:Yumi falling into the virtual sea]] without actually doing anything to change the future, until Jeremie finally realized how useless it was and coded it out.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'', Odd's [[WhatKindofLamePowerIsHeartAnyway very useful]] ability to see the future provided provides endless examples of this. The first season seemed seems pretty convinced that his real superpower was is watching things like [[spoiler:Yumi falling into the virtual sea]] Digital Sea]] without actually doing anything to change the future, until Jeremie Jérémie finally realized realizes how useless it was is and coded doesn't bother coding it out.back after an update erased it.


* Subverted in the crossover Comicbook/{{Spawn}} / Comicbook/{{Wildcats}}, where future versions of Grifter and Zealoth (the former being the original's future self but the latter being a new Zealoth) are sent in the past to slay Spawn, and as such prevent a future where Spawn became a ruthless dictator known as the Ipsissim. When they fail to kill him, the present Wildcats and Spawn agree to join them in the future to defeat the Ipsissim, but it turns out this was part of a predestination paradox, as the Ispissim uses the opportunity to give Spawn the medals that corrupted him and caused him to turn evil to begin with. When back to the present, the influence stats, and Spawn starts EvilGloating... until the future Wildcats realize their mistake and make a last attempt to modify a minor action in the past. This causes Spawn to recognize future Zealoth as an adult version of his beloved wife's daughter Cyan, come back to his senses and handle over the medals to her, such preventing his transformation into the Ipsissim and erasing this alternate future.

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* Subverted in the crossover Comicbook/{{Spawn}} / Comicbook/{{Wildcats}}, where future versions of Grifter and Zealoth Zealot (the former being the original's future self but the latter being a new Zealoth) Zealot) are sent in into the past to slay Spawn, and as such Spawn to prevent a future where Spawn became him becoming a ruthless dictator known as the Ipsissim. Ipsissimus. When they fail to kill him, the present Wildcats and Spawn agree to join go with them in into the future to defeat the Ipsissim, Ipsissimus, but it turns out this was part of a predestination paradox, as the Ispissim Ipsissimus uses the opportunity to give Spawn the medals medallion that corrupted him and caused him to turn evil to begin with. When back to the present, the influence stats, and Spawn starts EvilGloating... until the future Wildcats realize their mistake and make a last attempt to modify a minor action in the past. This causes Spawn to recognize future Zealoth Zealot as an adult version of his beloved wife's widow's daughter Cyan, come back to his senses and handle over hand the medals medallion to her, such thus preventing his transformation into the Ipsissim and erasing this alternate future.


* Stories with this trope are OlderThanDirt. One of the best-known of these stories is from ''Literature/TheHistories'' of Herodotus. While Herodotus has many stories of inevitable fates (reflecting the ancient Greek worldview), one story is still widely known 2500 years later. Herodotus reports that when Croesus, King of Lydia (a country in western Anatolia--now Turkey--which was one of the Great Powers of its day, and famous for its wealth) sent a massive convoy to the Oracle at Delphi carrying literal tons of gold, silver, and other luxuries to ask the Oracle a question: Should Croesus attack the Persians? And the Oracle famously answered: "If Croesus attacks the Persians, he will destroy a great empire." Croesus apparently read that to mean he would win, and proceeds to attack the Persians. Problem is, the Persians are led by this guy named [[UsefulNotes/CyrusTheGreat Cyrus]], and he beats the snot out of the Lydians, taking their whole empire and capturing Croesus (whom he makes an advisor). But the Oracle was right--[[ExactWords Croesus did destroy a great empire]], [[ProphecyTwist just not the one he was thinking of]].

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* Stories with this trope are OlderThanDirt.at least OlderThanFeudalism. One of the best-known of these stories is from ''Literature/TheHistories'' of Herodotus. While Herodotus has many stories of inevitable fates (reflecting the ancient Greek worldview), one story is still widely known 2500 years later. Herodotus reports that when Croesus, King of Lydia (a country in western Anatolia--now Turkey--which was one of the Great Powers of its day, and famous for its wealth) sent a massive convoy to the Oracle at Delphi carrying literal tons of gold, silver, and other luxuries to ask the Oracle a question: Should Croesus attack the Persians? And the Oracle famously answered: "If Croesus attacks the Persians, he will destroy a great empire." Croesus apparently read that to mean he would win, and proceeds to attack the Persians. Problem is, the Persians are led by this guy named [[UsefulNotes/CyrusTheGreat Cyrus]], and he beats the snot out of the Lydians, taking their whole empire and capturing Croesus (whom he makes an advisor). But the Oracle was right--[[ExactWords Croesus did destroy a great empire]], [[ProphecyTwist just not the one he was thinking of]].


* One of the best-known stories is from ''Literature/TheHistories'' of Herodotus. While Herodotus has many stories of inevitable fates (reflecting the ancient Greek worldview), one story is still widely known 2500 years later. Herodotus reports that when Croesus, King of Lydia (a country in western Anatolia--now Turkey--which was one of the Great Powers of its day, and famous for its wealth) sent a massive convoy to the Oracle at Delphi carrying literal tons of gold, silver, and other luxuries to ask the Oracle a question: Should Croesus attack the Persians? And the Oracle famously answered: "If Croesus attacks the Persians, he will destroy a great empire." Croesus apparently read that to mean he would win, and proceeds to attack the Persians. Problem is, the Persians are led by this guy named [[UsefulNotes/CyrusTheGreat Cyrus]], and he beats the snot out of the Lydians, taking their whole empire and capturing Croesus (whom he makes an advisor). But the Oracle was right--[[ExactWords Croesus did destroy a great empire]], [[ProphecyTwist just not the one he was thinking of]].
* ''Literature/LeftBehind'' and all Christian-related end-times fictional stories feature the prophecies in the Book of Revelations.
** In universe, the final book of the ''Left Behind'' series, ''Kingdom Come'' has the case of [[LaResistance the Other Light]], an organization of Luciferians dedicated to overthrowing Jesus and God and subverting the Biblical prophecies that preordain their ultimate defeat. The hopeless nature of their fight, and the rather unsympathetic nature of the Christian characters has caused some to view the Other Light as [[DoomedMoralVictor doomed moral victors]] or at worst [[IneffectualSympatheticVillain ineffectual sympathetic villains]] rather than the forces of pure evil.
* {{Subverted}} in ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'', when the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come shows Scrooge shadows of things prophesied by the Ghost of Christmas Present, including Scrooge dying sooner than expected with his belongings being plundered by his maid, laundress and undertaker, as well as the impending death of Tiny Tim:
-->'''Ghost of Christmas Present''': I see a vacant seat in the poor chimney corner, and a crutch without an owner. If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, the child will die... If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, none other of my race will find him here."
** After seeing the vision, and pleading for a second chance, Scrooge makes good on his promise by buying a huge turkey for Bob Cratchit's family, promoting Bob to Scrooge's partner, donating generously to the charity solicitors, and finding physicians for Tiny Tim.
* The plot of Creator/PhilipKDick's novel ''The World Jones Made'' is driven by the titular Floyd Jones, who has the power to see one year into the future. Unfortunately, after he sees the future, he loses the ability to change the decisions he makes in that future - possibly because he's actually sending his memories ''back'' through time to his younger self.
* Seems to be the case in ''Literature/ShamanOfTheUndead'' universe. If Ida foresees something, you can be sure that it ''will'' happen. If she foresees your death, no matter what you do, you'll still die, even if in ProphecyTwist [[spoiler:she'll be the one to kill you by accident.]]

to:

* Stories with this trope are OlderThanDirt. One of the best-known of these stories is from ''Literature/TheHistories'' of Herodotus. While Herodotus has many stories of inevitable fates (reflecting the ancient Greek worldview), one story is still widely known 2500 years later. Herodotus reports that when Croesus, King of Lydia (a country in western Anatolia--now Turkey--which was one of the Great Powers of its day, and famous for its wealth) sent a massive convoy to the Oracle at Delphi carrying literal tons of gold, silver, and other luxuries to ask the Oracle a question: Should Croesus attack the Persians? And the Oracle famously answered: "If Croesus attacks the Persians, he will destroy a great empire." Croesus apparently read that to mean he would win, and proceeds to attack the Persians. Problem is, the Persians are led by this guy named [[UsefulNotes/CyrusTheGreat Cyrus]], and he beats the snot out of the Lydians, taking their whole empire and capturing Croesus (whom he makes an advisor). But the Oracle was right--[[ExactWords Croesus did destroy a great empire]], [[ProphecyTwist just not the one he was thinking of]].
* ''Literature/LeftBehind'' and all Christian-related end-times fictional stories feature the prophecies in the Book of Revelations.
**
In universe, the final book of the ''Left Behind'' series, ''Kingdom Come'' has the case of [[LaResistance the Other Light]], an organization of Luciferians dedicated to overthrowing Jesus and God and subverting the Biblical prophecies that preordain their ultimate defeat. The hopeless nature of their fight, and the rather unsympathetic nature of the Christian characters has caused some to view the Other Light as [[DoomedMoralVictor doomed moral victors]] or at worst [[IneffectualSympatheticVillain ineffectual sympathetic villains]] rather than the forces of pure evil.
* {{Subverted}} in ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'', when the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come shows Scrooge shadows of things prophesied by the Ghost of Christmas Present, including Scrooge
''Literature/BeforeIFall'', after dying sooner than expected with his belongings being plundered by his maid, laundress and undertaker, as well as in a car crash while leaving a party, Samantha is forced to relive the impending death last day of Tiny Tim:
-->'''Ghost of Christmas Present''': I see a vacant seat in the poor chimney corner, and a crutch without an owner. If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, the child will die... If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, none other of my race will find him here."
** After seeing the vision, and pleading for a second chance, Scrooge makes good on his promise by buying a huge turkey for Bob Cratchit's family, promoting Bob to Scrooge's partner, donating generously to the charity solicitors, and finding physicians for Tiny Tim.
* The plot of Creator/PhilipKDick's novel ''The World Jones Made'' is driven by the titular Floyd Jones, who has the power to see one year into the future. Unfortunately, after he sees the future, he loses the ability to change the decisions he makes in that future - possibly because he's actually sending his memories ''back'' through time to his younger self.
* Seems to be the case in ''Literature/ShamanOfTheUndead'' universe. If Ida foresees something, you can be sure that it ''will'' happen. If she foresees your death, no
her life. No matter what you do, you'll still die, even if in ProphecyTwist [[spoiler:she'll be what, at 12:39 am, she always dies (or starts over on the one to kill you by accident.same day), and she finds that [[spoiler:Juliet Sykes always kills herself, until Samantha jumps in front of her, thus ending the GroundhogDayLoop.]]



* {{Subverted}} in ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'', when the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come shows Scrooge shadows of things prophesied by the Ghost of Christmas Present, including Scrooge dying sooner than expected with his belongings being plundered by his maid, laundress and undertaker, as well as the impending death of Tiny Tim:
-->'''Ghost of Christmas Present''': I see a vacant seat in the poor chimney corner, and a crutch without an owner. If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, the child will die... If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, none other of my race will find him here."
** After seeing the vision, and pleading for a second chance, Scrooge makes good on his promise by buying a huge turkey for Bob Cratchit's family, promoting Bob to Scrooge's partner, donating generously to the charity solicitors, and finding physicians for Tiny Tim.
* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
** Comes up a few times. There's a plan for the world, and the world doesn't particularly care what the people think or even do. In ''Discworld/{{Mort}}'', Mort saves the life of a princess he was supposed to reap. That part goes fine, but the princess quickly discovers that everyone is still ''acting'' like she died, with mourning colors being raised in the halls and repeatedly forgetting about the princess even when she's standing right there. Even when she recruits a wizard (who can see her) as the "royal recognizer," it doesn't really help. In the end, [[spoiler:Death talks to the gods, and they agree to change the plan because they're a bunch of romantic saps]].
** Played straight and subverted in ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'' by Creator/TerryPratchett
*** Early in the book a psychic sees [[spoiler:the future burning of Ankh-Morpork]], and races off away only to be killed in an avalanche - proving that Death also has a sense of humour
*** Later, Rincewind sees Death, who's surprised to meet the failed wizard, since he has an appointment with Rincewind the next day in another city. Death even offers to lend Rincewind a fast horse, but wisely he doesn't take up the offer. (This is Pratchett's take on an old Arab legend - see below under Myth & Folklore.)
* In Creator/HBeamPiper's short story ''The Edge of the Knife'', a history professor remembers flashes of the future as well as the past; what he doesn't always remember is "the edge of the knife" - the knife-blade moment of the present separating the two - and so he gets into trouble for things like looking for books in the university library that won't be written for several hundred years, because he wants to draw analogies between two different historical situations. He copes with all this by thinking of events being just as much historical facts if they happened yesterday or will happen in the future.
%%* Creator/JaneYolen's ''Literature/GreatAltaSaga''. Jenna, destined to be a MessianicArchetype for her people, eventually accepts that she is "the Anna for this Turning".
* Brought home in ''[[Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods]]'' when [[spoiler:his mom contracts the plague]]; Gregor acknowledges mentally that there was no other way to ensure the prophecy would happen the way it needed to.



* Cersei Lannister in Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' is haunted by a childhood prophecy that has successfully predicted several events of her life; this prophecy also predicts that she will outlive all her children, that she will be supplanted by someone younger and more beautiful, and that her little brother will strangle her. All of her attempts to prevent these things from happening only serve to alienate those around her.
** Running tally: [[spoiler:Joffrey is dead, Tommen's fate is largely dependent on her own (outlook not good), and Myrcella is surrounded by people who, while they don't wish her harm, will use her to gain power. Sansa Stark is being groomed for rulership by Littlefinger, Margaery Tyrell isn't dead yet, and there's Dany Targaryen. ''And'' she has begun to alienate Jaime--also her younger brother, if only by minutes--while Tyrion yet lives]].
** On the other hand, The Stallion That Mounts the World, a prophesied warrior destined to become the greatest of kings and lead the Dothraki across the sea died, stillborn. Unless the prophecy actually referred to Dany and the ones speaking got it wrong. Given that this is apparently the case with Stannis and Melisandre, it's quite possible.
* A major plot point in Audrey Niffenegger's ''Literature/TheTimeTravelersWife''. Henry realizes there is absolutely nothing he can do to change the past, when he tried (and failed) numerous times to warn a mother that her child is about to be in an accident, and when he [[spoiler:had to witness his mother's death]] over 50 times without being able to prevent it. The story doesn't delve into what would happen if any of the characters ever did try to change their fate - they simply accepted the fact that they couldn't.
* In Creator/HBeamPiper's short story ''The Edge of the Knife'', a history professor remembers flashes of the future as well as the past; what he doesn't always remember is "the edge of the knife" - the knife-blade moment of the present separating the two - and so he gets into trouble for things like looking for books in the university library that won't be written for several hundred years, because he wants to draw analogies between two different historical situations. He copes with all this by thinking of events being just as much historical facts if they happened yesterday or will happen in the future.
* The Creator/TimPowers novel ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever'' has an interesting twist on this: one character, a Mossad agent, keeps having premonitions of things he will ''never'' do again (e.g. he hears a ringing phone and realizes that's the last time he will ''ever'' hear a ringing phone). The first time it happened -- he touched something and received the premonition that he would never touch it again -- he immediately tried to prove the premonition wrong, and not only failed but got his hand horribly disfigured instead. In the end, [[spoiler:we're never actually shown why he has these premonitions, but they all come right when he dies]].
* Creator/TerryPratchett and Creator/NeilGaiman's ''Literature/GoodOmens''.
** [[spoiler:Adam decides that it doesn't matter what is Written, [[ScrewDestiny because you can always cross it out]]]].
** It reaches the point that two main characters realize they can pick any part of the book of prophecy at random and be assured that it'll be one relevant to their situation.
* Played straight and subverted in ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'' by Creator/TerryPratchett
** Early in the book a psychic sees [[spoiler:the future burning of Ankh-Morpork]], and races off away only to be killed in an avalanche - proving that Death also has a sense of humour
** Later, Rincewind sees Death, who's surprised to meet the failed wizard, since he has an appointment with Rincewind the next day in another city. Death even offers to lend Rincewind a fast horse, but wisely he doesn't take up the offer. (This is Pratchett's take on an old Arab legend - see below under Myth & Folklore.)
* Creator/NormanSpinrad's short story "The Weed of Time". The victim - er, narrator - remembered the entirety of his 110-year life from the moment of his birth. An expedition to another planet brought back the weed which caused the precognition effect and it had been released accidentally and grew wild. The experience drives him insane, because he cannot change any of the events he experiences.
* Creator/KurtVonnegut's ''Literature/SlaughterhouseFive'' takes this to the extreme, with the protagonist hallucinating himself a theory about the non-existence of free will, involving MentalTimeTravel and aliens. He does this in to make sense of what he saw during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.

to:

* Cersei Lannister in Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' is haunted by a childhood prophecy ''Literature/IAmMordred'': Morgan le Fay believes this, and explicitly warns Mordred that has successfully predicted several events of her life; this prophecy also predicts that she will outlive all her children, that she will no matter what, he'll never be supplanted by someone younger and more beautiful, and that her little brother will strangle her. All of her attempts able to prevent these things from happening only serve to alienate those around her.
** Running tally: [[spoiler:Joffrey is dead, Tommen's fate is largely dependent on her own (outlook not good), and Myrcella is surrounded by people who, while they don't wish her harm, will use her to gain power. Sansa Stark is being groomed for rulership by Littlefinger, Margaery Tyrell isn't dead yet, and there's Dany Targaryen. ''And'' she has begun to alienate Jaime--also her younger brother, if only by minutes--while Tyrion yet lives]].
** On the other hand, The Stallion That Mounts the World, a prophesied warrior destined to become the greatest of kings and lead the Dothraki across the sea died, stillborn. Unless
avert the prophecy actually referred about him. He tries anyway. [[spoiler: In the end, he fails.]]
* ''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': According
to Dany Wiol, the goddess of the Element Wind and Knowledge of the ones speaking got it wrong. Given Future, there are certain things that this are ''guaranteed'' to happen, but there are many ways in which they could happen. For instance, say there are two people who are destined to marry each other, they could either do just that, go UndercoverAsLovers, engage in CourtlyLove, jointly become {{parental substitute}}s for the same kid, etc. There is apparently no possible future where ''something'' along the lines of "these two people marry each other" does not happen.
* The final book of the ''Literature/LeftBehind'' series, ''Kingdom Come'' has
the case with Stannis of [[LaResistance the Other Light]], an organization of Luciferians dedicated to overthrowing Jesus and Melisandre, it's quite possible.
God and subverting the Biblical prophecies that preordain their ultimate defeat. The hopeless nature of their fight, and the rather unsympathetic nature of the Christian characters has caused some to view the Other Light as [[DoomedMoralVictor doomed moral victors]] or at worst [[IneffectualSympatheticVillain ineffectual sympathetic villains]] rather than the forces of pure evil.
* A This is a major plot point in Audrey Niffenegger's ''Literature/TheTimeTravelersWife''. Henry realizes there is absolutely nothing he can do theme of Creator/DeanKoontz's ''Lightning'': It's very difficult to change the past, when he tried (and failed) numerous times to warn a mother that her child is about to be in an accident, and when he [[spoiler:had to witness his mother's death]] over 50 times without being able to prevent it. The story doesn't delve into what would happen if any of the characters ever did try to change their fate - they simply accepted the fact that they couldn't.
* In Creator/HBeamPiper's short story ''The Edge of the Knife'', a history professor remembers flashes of the future as well as the past; what he doesn't always remember is "the edge of the knife" - the knife-blade moment of the present separating the two - and so he gets into trouble for things like looking for books in the university library that won't be written for several hundred years,
future, because he wants "destiny struggles to draw analogies between two different historical situations. He copes with all this by thinking of events being just as much historical facts if they happened yesterday or will happen in reassert the future.
* The Creator/TimPowers novel ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever'' has an interesting twist on this: one character, a Mossad agent, keeps having premonitions of things he will ''never'' do again (e.g. he hears a ringing phone and realizes that's the last time he will ''ever'' hear a ringing phone). The first time it happened -- he touched something and received the premonition
pattern that he would never touch it again -- he immediately tried was meant to prove the premonition wrong, and not only failed but got his hand horribly disfigured instead. In the end, [[spoiler:we're never actually shown why he has these premonitions, but they all come right when he dies]].
* Creator/TerryPratchett and Creator/NeilGaiman's ''Literature/GoodOmens''.
** [[spoiler:Adam decides that it doesn't matter what is Written, [[ScrewDestiny because you can always cross it out]]]].
** It reaches the point that two main characters realize they can pick any part of the book of prophecy at random and be assured that it'll be one relevant to their situation.
* Played straight and subverted in ''Discworld/TheColourOfMagic'' by Creator/TerryPratchett
** Early in the book a psychic sees [[spoiler:the future burning of Ankh-Morpork]], and races off away only to be killed in an avalanche - proving that Death also has a sense of humour
** Later, Rincewind sees Death, who's surprised to meet the failed wizard, since he has an appointment with Rincewind the next day in another city. Death even offers to lend Rincewind a fast horse, but wisely he doesn't take up the offer. (This is Pratchett's take on an old Arab legend - see below under Myth & Folklore.)
* Creator/NormanSpinrad's short story "The Weed of Time". The victim - er, narrator - remembered the entirety of his 110-year life from the moment of his birth. An expedition to another planet brought back the weed which caused the precognition effect and it had been released accidentally and grew wild. The experience drives him insane, because he cannot change any of the events he experiences.
* Creator/KurtVonnegut's ''Literature/SlaughterhouseFive'' takes this to the extreme, with the protagonist hallucinating himself a theory about the non-existence of free will, involving MentalTimeTravel and aliens. He does this in to make sense of what he saw during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.
be."



** Ilúvatar (God) acts mostly through fate: Gandalf tells Frodo that "there are other forces at work in the world...one could say Bilbo was ''meant'' to find the Ring, in which case you were also ''meant'' to have it."
** The Lord of the Nazgûl not only fits this trope but proves that Fate has backup plans. The prophecy that no man could harm him proved insufficient in the face of [[spoiler:being opposed by the woman Éowyn and the Hobbit Merry, one of whom is not a man by gender while the other is not a Man by race]]. However, it can be argued that Fate originally meant for the Nazgûl Lord to face Gandalf [[spoiler:who is also not a Man, but an immortal Maia]] and had to go to [[TimeForPlanB Plan B]] after [[spoiler:Denethor's attempt to kill himself and his son forced Gandalf away from the battle at the crucial moment]]. If so, then [[spoiler:it's a Plan B that was thought out well in advance, because many months earlier Merry just happened to acquire a knife that was engraved with spells to defeat the Witch-King of Angmar, who just happened to be the selfsame Lord of the Nazgûl, without which his stroke might not have weakened the Nazgûl's power sufficiently for Éowyn to deliver the final coup]]. But that bit's not in the movie.

to:

** Ilúvatar (God) ({{God}}) acts mostly through fate: Gandalf tells Frodo that "there are other forces at work in the world...one could say Bilbo was ''meant'' to find the Ring, in which case you were also ''meant'' to have it."
** The Lord of the Nazgûl not only fits this trope but proves that Fate has backup plans. The prophecy that no man could harm him proved insufficient in the face of [[spoiler:being opposed by the woman Éowyn and the Hobbit Merry, one of whom is not a man by gender while the other is not a Man by race]]. However, it can be argued that Fate originally meant for the Nazgûl Lord to face Gandalf [[spoiler:who is also not a Man, but an immortal Maia]] and had to go to [[TimeForPlanB Plan B]] after [[spoiler:Denethor's attempt to kill himself and his son forced Gandalf away from the battle at the crucial moment]]. If so, then [[spoiler:it's a Plan B that was thought out well in advance, because many months earlier Merry just happened to acquire a knife that was engraved with spells to defeat the Witch-King of Angmar, who just happened to be the selfsame Lord of the Nazgûl, without which his stroke might not have weakened the Nazgûl's power sufficiently for Éowyn to deliver the final coup]]. But that bit's not in the movie.
"



* Creator/JaneYolen's ''Literature/GreatAltaSaga''. Jenna, destined to be a MessianicArchetype for her people, eventually accepts that she is "the Anna for this Turning".
* In Creator/RobertEHoward's "[[Literature/XuthalOfTheDusk The Slithering Shadow]]", Thalis urges this on Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian about the LivingShadow Thog.
-->''"Be at ease," she advised. "If Thog wishes you, he will take you, wherever you are. That man you mentioned, who screamed and ran did you not hear him give one great cry, and then fall silent? In his frenzy, he must have run full into that which he sought to escape. No man can avoid his fate."''
* Explicitly the case in ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime''. Several events that occur, occur because they are in the Pattern woven by the Wheel. The PowerTrio in particular ''[[WindsOfDestinyChange cause]]'' [[WindsOfDestinyChange people to take their fated roles in prophecy]], and conversely [[{{Railroading}} have their own actions dictated by the Pattern at many points]].

to:

* Creator/JaneYolen's ''Literature/GreatAltaSaga''. Jenna, destined to be a MessianicArchetype for her people, eventually accepts that she This trope is "the Anna for this Turning".
* In Creator/RobertEHoward's "[[Literature/XuthalOfTheDusk The Slithering Shadow]]", Thalis urges this on Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian about
actually part of the LivingShadow Thog.
-->''"Be at ease," she advised. "If Thog wishes you, he will take you, wherever you are. That man you mentioned, who screamed and ran did you not hear him give one great cry, and then fall silent? In his frenzy, he must have run full into that which he sought
draw of ''Literature/MachineOfDeath'' Many characters try to escape. No man can avoid his fate."''
* Explicitly
subvert their, or other peoples, predictions out of fear or wanting to prove the case in ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime''. Several events that occur, occur because machine wrong. You explicitly know they are in the Pattern woven by the Wheel. The PowerTrio in particular ''[[WindsOfDestinyChange cause]]'' [[WindsOfDestinyChange people to take die of whatever their fated roles in prophecy]], and conversely [[{{Railroading}} have their own actions dictated by paper says anyway, but [[http://www.qwantz.com/index.php?comic=675 according to the Pattern at many points]].comic that spawned the project]] "part of the fun would be seeing how".



* ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' and its [[Literature/TheHeroesOfOlympus sequel series]] has this in spades. In keeping with the heavy ties to Greek Mythology, all prophecies in the story come to pass in some form or another. Trying to avoid or fight off destiny only results in either nothing happening, or worse causing the prophecy to [[SelfFulfillingProphecy come true in the attempt to change it]]. That being said the prophecies themselves are very cryptic, and as a result are open to several, sometime positive, interpretations. (In fact, in the second series, Zeus refuses to accept the excuse of acting solely to help bring a prophecy to fulfillment as excuse, saying that there are always several ways to read them and for them to come true and actively trying to make sure they do happen in the way you think they will limits the possibilities.)



* This trope is actually part of the draw of ''Literature/MachineOfDeath'' Many characters try to subvert their, or other peoples, predictions out of fear or wanting to prove the machine wrong. You explicitly know they die of whatever their paper says anyway, but [[http://www.qwantz.com/index.php?comic=675 according to the comic that spawned the project]] "part of the fun would be seeing how".
* This is explicitly the case in ''Literature/TimeScout''. You can act in the past, picking things up, talking to people, even killing people. However, if someone is crucial to some later act, he cannot be killed. YOU can, though, so you should be careful not to anger the wrong person. Paradox will be averted through a convenient coincidence.
* This is a primary theme of the ''Literature/{{Wolfsangel}}'' cycle. The main characters are bound to play their roles in the birth and death of Odin and Fenris across many reincarnations. [[spoiler:This is due to Odin, who is trying to fight/delay his fate by having his destiny play out on Earth; once the cycle of deaths is broken, the Norns will set Ragnarok in motion and end the era of the Norse gods for good. A HopeSpot appears in ''Lord of Slaughter'' with a way to break the cycle at last, [[UpToEleven but even with the Norns themselves pushing for it]], things do not go as planned.]]

to:

* This trope is actually part In ''Literature/TheSagaOfArrowOdd'', a witch prophecies that Odd will live three hundred years, then be killed at the place where he grew up by the skull of the draw of ''Literature/MachineOfDeath'' Many characters try horse Faxi. Odd kills Faxi and becomes a viking, planning never to subvert their, or other peoples, predictions out of fear or wanting to prove the machine wrong. You explicitly know they die of whatever their paper says anyway, but [[http://www.qwantz.com/index.php?comic=675 according to the comic that spawned the project]] "part of the fun would be seeing how".
* This
return home. When Odd is explicitly the case in ''Literature/TimeScout''. You can act three hundred years old, he suddenly grows homesick and returns home, where he is killed by a viper nesting in the past, picking things up, talking to people, even killing people. However, if someone is crucial to some later act, he cannot be killed. YOU can, though, so you should be careful not to anger the wrong person. Paradox will be averted through a convenient coincidence.
* This is a primary theme
skull of the ''Literature/{{Wolfsangel}}'' cycle. The main characters are bound to play their roles in the birth and death of Odin and Fenris across many reincarnations. [[spoiler:This is due to Odin, who is trying to fight/delay his fate by having his destiny play out on Earth; once the cycle of deaths is broken, the Norns will set Ragnarok in motion and end the era of the Norse gods for good. A HopeSpot appears in ''Lord of Slaughter'' with a way to break the cycle at last, [[UpToEleven but even with the Norns themselves pushing for it]], things do not go as planned.]]Faxi.



* In ''Literature/BeforeIFall'', after dying in a car crash while leaving a party, Samantha is forced to relive the last day of her life. No matter what, at 12:39 am, she always dies (or starts over on the same day), and she finds that [[spoiler:Juliet Sykes always kills herself, until Samantha jumps in front of her, thus ending the GroundhogDayLoop.]]
* Rule number ''1'' of ''Literature/ThePowerOfFive''.
** There is even a [[spoiler:Librarian who guards the records and life stories of every being that's ever existed. [[CrypticConversation Naturally]], [[VaguenessIsComing he]] [[YouWillKnowWhatToDo isn't]] [[BecauseDestinySaysSo very helpful]], at least in ''Necropolis'']].
* Brought home in ''[[Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods]]'' when [[spoiler:his mom contracts the plague]]; Gregor acknowledges mentally that there was no other way to ensure the prophecy would happen the way it needed to.
* This is a major theme of Creator/DeanKoontz's ''Lightning'': It's very difficult to change the future, because "destiny struggles to reassert the pattern that was meant to be."
* In ''Literature/TheSagaOfArrowOdd'', a witch prophecies that Odd will live three hundred years, then be killed at the place where he grew up by the skull of the horse Faxi. Odd kills Faxi and becomes a viking, planning never to return home. When Odd is three hundred years old, he suddenly grows homesick and returns home, where he is killed by a viper nesting in the skull of Faxi.

to:

* In ''Literature/BeforeIFall'', after dying in a car crash while leaving a party, Samantha is forced Creator/KurtVonnegut's ''Literature/SlaughterhouseFive'' takes this to relive the last day of her life. No matter what, at 12:39 am, she always dies (or starts over on extreme, with the same day), protagonist hallucinating himself a theory about the non-existence of free will, involving MentalTimeTravel and she finds that [[spoiler:Juliet Sykes always kills herself, until Samantha jumps aliens. He does this in front to make sense of her, thus ending the GroundhogDayLoop.]]
*
what he saw during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.
%%*
Rule number ''1'' of ''Literature/ThePowerOfFive''.
** 55** There is even a [[spoiler:Librarian who guards the records and life stories of every being that's ever existed. [[CrypticConversation Naturally]], [[VaguenessIsComing he]] [[YouWillKnowWhatToDo isn't]] [[BecauseDestinySaysSo very helpful]], at least in ''Necropolis'']].
* Brought home in ''[[Literature/TheUnderlandChronicles Gregor In Creator/RobertEHoward's "[[Literature/XuthalOfTheDusk The Slithering Shadow]]", Thalis urges this on Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian about the LivingShadow Thog.
-->''"Be at ease," she advised. "If Thog wishes you, he will take you, wherever you are. That man you mentioned, who screamed
and the Curse of the Warmbloods]]'' when [[spoiler:his mom contracts the plague]]; Gregor acknowledges mentally ran did you not hear him give one great cry, and then fall silent? In his frenzy, he must have run full into that there was no other way which he sought to ensure the prophecy would happen the way it needed to.
* This is a major theme of Creator/DeanKoontz's ''Lightning'': It's very difficult to change the future, because "destiny struggles to reassert the pattern that was meant to be."
* In ''Literature/TheSagaOfArrowOdd'', a witch prophecies that Odd will live three hundred years, then be killed at the place where he grew up by the skull of the horse Faxi. Odd kills Faxi and becomes a viking, planning never to return home. When Odd is three hundred years old, he suddenly grows homesick and returns home, where he is killed by a viper nesting in the skull of Faxi.
escape. No man can avoid his fate."''



* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'': Comes up a few times. There's a plan for the world, and the world doesn't particularly care what the people think or even do. In ''Discworld/{{Mort}}'', Mort saves the life of a princess he was supposed to reap. That part goes fine, but the princess quickly discovers that everyone is still ''acting'' like she died, with mourning colors being raised in the halls and repeatedly forgetting about the princess even when she's standing right there. Even when she recruits a wizard (who can see her) as the "royal recognizer," it doesn't really help. In the end, [[spoiler:Death talks to the gods, and they agree to change the plan because they're a bunch of romantic saps]].
* ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' and its [[Literature/TheHeroesOfOlympus sequel series]] has this in spades. In keeping with the heavy ties to Greek Mythology, all prophecies in the story come to pass in some form or another. Trying to avoid or fight off destiny only results in either nothing happening, or worse causing the prophecy to [[SelfFulfillingProphecy come true in the attempt to change it]]. That being said the prophecies themselves are very cryptic, and as a result are open to several, sometime positive, interpretations. (In fact, in the second series, Zeus refuses to accept the excuse of acting solely to help bring a prophecy to fulfillment as excuse, saying that there are always several ways to read them and for them to come true and actively trying to make sure they do happen in the way you think they will limits the possibilities.)
* ''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': According to Wiol, the goddess of the Element Wind and Knowledge of the Future, there are certain things that are ''guaranteed'' to happen, but there are many ways in which they could happen. For instance, say there are two people who are destined to marry each other, they could either do just that, go UndercoverAsLovers, engage in CourtlyLove, jointly become {{parental substitute}}s for the same kid, etc. There is no possible future where ''something'' along the lines of "these two people marry each other" does not happen.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'': Comes up Cersei Lannister in Creator/GeorgeRRMartin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' is haunted by a few times. There's a plan childhood prophecy that has successfully predicted several events of her life; this prophecy also predicts that she will outlive all her children, that she will be supplanted by someone younger and more beautiful, and that her little brother will strangle her. All of her attempts to prevent these things from happening only serve to alienate those around her.
** Running tally: [[spoiler:Joffrey is dead, Tommen's fate is largely dependent on her own (outlook not good), and Myrcella is surrounded by people who, while they don't wish her harm, will use her to gain power. Sansa Stark is being groomed
for rulership by Littlefinger, Margaery Tyrell isn't dead yet, and there's Dany Targaryen. ''And'' she has begun to alienate Jaime--also her younger brother, if only by minutes--while Tyrion yet lives]].
** On
the world, other hand, The Stallion That Mounts the World, a prophesied warrior destined to become the greatest of kings and lead the Dothraki across the sea died, stillborn. Unless the prophecy actually referred to Dany and the world ones speaking got it wrong. Given that this is apparently the case with Stannis and Melisandre, it's quite possible.
* Seems to be the case in ''Literature/ShamanOfTheUndead'' universe. If Ida foresees something, you can be sure that it ''will'' happen. If she foresees your death, no matter what you do, you'll still die, even if in ProphecyTwist [[spoiler:she'll be the one to kill you by accident.]]
* ''Literature/TheThebaid'': Most of the gods are horrified to learn that the people of Thebes and Argos will be massacred in a great war and lobby to stop it. Most except Jupiter, who orders his lessers to carry out the decrees of Fate or suffer the wrath of his thunderbolt. Unable to challenge the king of the universe, all the unhappy gods can do is delay the inevitable:
** Juno is the most successful at fitting fate to her designs, since she leverages Jupiter's many adulteries to make him concede that Argos shouldn't be totally destroyed.
** Venus stops Mars from rousing the Argive army by breaking into tears in front of his chariot and waxing poetic about how Thebes' destruction will end the bloodline of their child Cadmus. Not wanting to upset his lover, Mars lets the men of Argos laze around for a week or two before Jupiter makes him stop procrastinating.
** Bacchus orders all his nymphs to dry up their rivers with the exception of one near Nemea. This forces King Adrastus to take his men their and sets up a chain of events that delays the war another few weeks.
** Phoebus knows a thing or two about fate, so he
doesn't particularly care what the people think or even do. In ''Discworld/{{Mort}}'', Mort saves work against Jupiter and is content to give one of his doomed oracles a noble death.
** Diana almost rebels against Jupiter to save
the life of a princess he was supposed to reap. That part goes fine, one of her devotees, but the princess quickly discovers that everyone is still ''acting'' like her twin Phoebus makes sure she died, with mourning colors being raised in the halls and repeatedly forgetting about the princess even when she's standing right there. Even when she recruits a wizard (who can see her) as the "royal recognizer," it doesn't really help. commit suicide like that. Instead, she gives her arrows to the boy who loves her, allowing him to end his life having killed many men in glorious battle.
* The Creator/TimPowers novel ''Literature/ThreeDaysToNever'' has an interesting twist on this: one character, a Mossad agent, keeps having premonitions of things he will ''never'' do again (e.g. he hears a ringing phone and realizes that's the last time he will ''ever'' hear a ringing phone). The first time it happened -- he touched something and received the premonition that he would never touch it again -- he immediately tried to prove the premonition wrong, and not only failed but got his hand horribly disfigured instead.
In the end, [[spoiler:Death talks to the gods, and [[spoiler:we're never actually shown why he has these premonitions, but they agree all come right when he dies]].
* This is explicitly the case in ''Literature/TimeScout''. You can act in the past, picking things up, talking to people, even killing people. However, if someone is crucial to some later act, he cannot be killed. YOU can, though, so you should be careful not to anger the wrong person. Paradox will be averted through a convenient coincidence.
* A major plot point in Audrey Niffenegger's ''Literature/TheTimeTravelersWife''. Henry realizes there is absolutely nothing he can do
to change the plan because they're past, when he tried (and failed) numerous times to warn a bunch of romantic saps]].
* ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians''
mother that her child is about to be in an accident, and its [[Literature/TheHeroesOfOlympus sequel series]] has this in spades. In keeping with the heavy ties when he [[spoiler:had to Greek Mythology, all prophecies in the witness his mother's death]] over 50 times without being able to prevent it. The story come to pass in some form or another. Trying to avoid or fight off destiny only results in either nothing happening, or worse causing doesn't delve into what would happen if any of the prophecy to [[SelfFulfillingProphecy come true in the attempt characters ever did try to change it]]. That being said their fate - they simply accepted the prophecies fact that they couldn't.
* Creator/NormanSpinrad's short story "The Weed of Time". The victim - er, narrator - remembered the entirety of his 110-year life from the moment of his birth. An expedition to another planet brought back the weed which caused the precognition effect and it had been released accidentally and grew wild. The experience drives him insane, because he cannot change any of the events he experiences.
* Explicitly the case in ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime''. Several events that occur, occur because they are in the Pattern woven by the Wheel. The PowerTrio in particular ''[[WindsOfDestinyChange cause]]'' [[WindsOfDestinyChange people to take their fated roles in prophecy]], and conversely [[{{Railroading}} have their own actions dictated by the Pattern at many points]].
* This is a primary theme of the ''Literature/{{Wolfsangel}}'' cycle. The main characters are bound to play their roles in the birth and death of Odin and Fenris across many reincarnations. [[spoiler:This is due to Odin, who is trying to fight/delay his fate by having his destiny play out on Earth; once the cycle of deaths is broken, the Norns will set Ragnarok in motion and end the era of the Norse gods for good. A HopeSpot appears in ''Lord of Slaughter'' with a way to break the cycle at last, [[UpToEleven but even with the Norns
themselves are very cryptic, and as a result are open to several, sometime positive, interpretations. (In fact, in the second series, Zeus refuses to accept the excuse of acting solely to help bring a prophecy to fulfillment as excuse, saying that there are always several ways to read them and pushing for them to come true and actively trying to make sure they do happen in the way you think they will limits the possibilities.)
* ''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': According to Wiol, the goddess of the Element Wind and Knowledge of the Future, there are certain
it]], things do not go as planned.]]
* The plot of Creator/PhilipKDick's novel ''The World Jones Made'' is driven by the titular Floyd Jones, who has the power to see one year into the future. Unfortunately, after he sees the future, he loses the ability to change the decisions he makes in
that are ''guaranteed'' to happen, but there are many ways in which they could happen. For instance, say there are two people who are destined to marry each other, they could either do just that, go UndercoverAsLovers, engage in CourtlyLove, jointly become {{parental substitute}}s for the same kid, etc. There is no possible future where ''something'' along the lines of "these two people marry each other" does not happen. - possibly because he's actually sending his memories ''back'' through time to his younger self.



* ''Literature/IAmMordred'': Morgan le Fay believes this, and explicitly warns Mordred that no matter what, he'll never be able to avert the prophecy about him. He tries anyway. [[spoiler: In the end, he fails.]]

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