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* The Asgardians in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse ''Film/{{Thor}}'' do this, but not as bad as in the comics. It manifests mostly as some old-fashioned word choice and a lack of contractions.

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* The Asgardians in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse ''Film/{{Thor}}'' do this, but not as bad as in the comics. It manifests mostly as some old-fashioned word choice and a lack of contractions. By ''Film/ThorRagnarok'', Thor and Loki have spent enough time around modern humans to talk like them, Skurge is implied to visit Midgard with some regularity, and Hela was imprisoned long before early modern English was developed and ignores it entirely, meaning that Odin is really the only Asgardian who still talks even remotely like that.

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* In ''Film/HeartOfDarkness1958'', a character prays: "Bring happiness to all thy creatures no matter what form thou hath [sic] cast them in."

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* ''VideoGame/Deltarune'' With heavy emphasis on the "butcherede" ("decidedesteth" comes to mind). Rouxls Kaard speaks like this with very few exceptions, an Affectionate Parody of all the characters from 90's-era translations who were given such speech patterns in earnest.


* Strangely enough Music/InsaneClownPosse attempts this with "walk into thy light" which they probably thought meant "step into the light" but accidently translates to the more nonsensical "step into your light"

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* Strangely enough Music/InsaneClownPosse attempts this with "walk into thy light" which they probably thought meant "step "walk into the light" but accidently translates to the more nonsensical "step "walk into your light"

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* Strangely enough Music/InsaneClownPosse attempts this with "walk into thy light" which they probably thought meant "step into the light" but accidently translates to the more nonsensical "step into your light"


--->'''Homer:''' Fair maiden of the spit, grant now my boon\\

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--->'''Homer:''' Fair Sweet maiden of the spit, grant now my boon\\


* ''WebAnimation/TurnaboutStorm'' has Twilight's conveniently titled ''[[TropesForDummies How to Be a Lawyer in 24 Hours]]'' book, which mixes this with PurpleProse for a painful effect.

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* ''WebAnimation/TurnaboutStorm'' has Twilight's conveniently titled ''[[TropesForDummies ''[[ParodiesForDummies How to Be a Lawyer in 24 Hours]]'' book, which mixes this with PurpleProse for a painful effect.

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* Grahf's catchphrase in ''Videogame/{{Xenogears}}'', "Doth thou desire the power?" It seems to be part of an incantation of some kind, as he speaks normally otherwise.
-->'''Grahf:''' Blossom, o fallen seed, and draw upon thy hidden powers!! Grant unto thee the power of the glorious 'Mother of Destruction'!


* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' has this at the start of one episode, where Steven, while giving Rose's sword to Connie, punctuates some of his words with "eth". Connie [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this at first, and tries to use the Olde Englishe correctly, but eventually just gives into the eth as well.

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* ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' has this at the start of one episode, "Nightmare Hospital" where Steven, while giving Rose's sword to Connie, punctuates some of his words with "eth". Connie [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this at first, and tries to use the Olde Englishe correctly, but eventually just gives into the eth -eth as well.


* The same trope is used in Spanish-speaking literature, especially in translations of foreign fantasy novels or anything older from the 20th century, but sometimes is used even in translations of ''modern literature'' as well, possibly as a signal that the characters doesn't speak Spanish or sometimes because the [[BlindIdiotTranslation translator is old-fashioned]]. Sometimes justified because almost all the translations of foreign literature are done in Spain (and sometimes in Colombia) and that country is the biggest market for literature in the Spanish-speaking world.
** "Thous" and "thees" appear in Creator/ErnestHemingway's ''Literature/AFarewellToArms'', to represent characters speaking Spanish with informal pronouns.

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* The same trope is used in Spanish-speaking literature, especially in translations of foreign fantasy novels or anything older from the 20th century, but sometimes is used even in translations of ''modern literature'' as well, possibly as a signal that the characters doesn't speak Spanish or sometimes because the [[BlindIdiotTranslation translator is old-fashioned]]. Sometimes justified because almost all the translations of foreign literature are done in Spain (and sometimes in Colombia) and that country is the biggest market for literature in the Spanish-speaking world.
**
world. "Thous" and "thees" appear in Creator/ErnestHemingway's ''Literature/AFarewellToArms'', which is written in English originally, to represent characters speaking Spanish with informal pronouns.



** William Henry Ireland (1775 - 1835), a slightly later forger inspired by Chatterton but rather less talented, started out by forging Creator/WilliamShakespeare ephemera but finally worked himself up to two complete plays, ''[[Literature/HistoriaBrittonum Vortigern and Rowena]]'', and ''UsefulNotes/HenryTheSecond''. Some of his attempts at "Elizabethan" spelling have to be read to be believed, such as "[G]ratitude is alle I have toe utter and that is tooe greate ande tooe sublyme a feeling for poore mortalls toe expresse".

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** * William Henry Ireland (1775 - 1835), a slightly later forger inspired by Chatterton but rather less talented, started out by forging Creator/WilliamShakespeare ephemera but finally worked himself up to two complete plays, ''[[Literature/HistoriaBrittonum Vortigern and Rowena]]'', and ''UsefulNotes/HenryTheSecond''. Some of his attempts at "Elizabethan" spelling have to be read to be believed, such as "[G]ratitude is alle I have toe utter and that is tooe greate ande tooe sublyme a feeling for poore mortalls toe expresse".



* Similarly, in ''[[Literature/WizardAndGlass Wizard and Glass]]'', the flashback book of ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'' series, Susan and Cordelia use "thee" (said to be part of "the old tongue") in both the subject and the object position, when in reality it was only the object form of "thou". And when it's used as a subject, verbs after it are conjugated in the third person, which is also incorrect. Also, Cordelia sometimes switches between "you" and "ye" with no apparent rules for distinguishing between them, and even uses "yerself" - seemingly meant to be a reflexive form of "ye" - although when "ye" was used in early modern English, its reflexive form was still "yourselves" (or "yourself" if used singularly).
** The described use of "thee" is identical to that in '''modern''' Quaker/Amish "plain speech" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testimony_of_simplicity#Simplicity_in_speech), which has evolved from its Early Modern English roots. But there's no excuse for the "ye" errors.

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* Similarly, in ''[[Literature/WizardAndGlass Wizard and Glass]]'', the flashback book of ''Franchise/TheDarkTower'' series, Susan and Cordelia use "thee" (said to be part of "the old tongue") in both the subject and the object position, when in reality it was only the object form of "thou". And when it's used as a subject, verbs after it are conjugated in the third person, which is also incorrect. Also, Cordelia sometimes switches between "you" and "ye" with no apparent rules for distinguishing between them, and even uses "yerself" - seemingly meant to be a reflexive form of "ye" - although when "ye" was used in early modern English, its reflexive form was still "yourselves" (or "yourself" if used singularly).
** The
singularly). (The described use of "thee" is identical to that in '''modern''' Quaker/Amish "plain speech" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testimony_of_simplicity#Simplicity_in_speech), which has evolved from its Early Modern English roots. But there's no excuse for the "ye" errors.)



* In Creator/DavidWeber's ''Heirs of Empire'' series, Jiltanith insists on speaking in "Elizabethan English". She says she does this to show her disdain for the modern world, but everyone else, including her father Horus (who has been around long enough to have inspired the Egyptian god), finds it annoying.
** Justified in-story--most of the crew of the counter-mutineer battleship have been awake through most of human history, but Jiltanith was put back into cryosleep around the Wars of the Roses and only woke up relatively recently.

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* In Creator/DavidWeber's ''Heirs of Empire'' series, Jiltanith insists on speaking in "Elizabethan English". She says she does this to show her disdain for the modern world, but everyone else, including her father Horus (who has been around long enough to have inspired the Egyptian god), finds it annoying.
** Justified
annoying. This is justified in-story--most of the crew of the counter-mutineer battleship have been awake through most of human history, but Jiltanith was put back into cryosleep around the Wars of the Roses and only woke up relatively recently.


* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''Homer speaks this way when trying to seduce Lunchlady Doris into giving him a taste of the suckling pig, at the Renaissance Faire, after she claims her ears are only open to "Ye Olde English."

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''Homer speaks this way when trying to seduce Lunchlady Doris into giving him a taste of the suckling pig, at the Renaissance Faire, after she claims her ears are only open to "Ye Olde English."

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''Homer speaks this way when trying to seduce Lunchlady Doris into giving him a taste of the suckling pig, at the Renaissance Faire, after she claims her ears are only open to "Ye Olde English."

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** [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] in the Polish version of the game, where their speech was translated into archaic - but mostly grammatically fine - version of Polish language. They're still sound like pompous asses there, but at least they get their thesaurus right.


** Cyan in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' talks the same way, making grievous errors like "I art" (though in Cyan's case he spoke in faux-historic Japanese in the Japanese version as well). Gau mimics Cyan and calls him Mr. Thou, much to his dismay.

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** Cyan in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' talks the same way, making grievous errors like "I art" (though in Cyan's case he spoke in faux-historic Japanese in the Japanese version as well). Gau mimics Cyan and calls him Mr. Thou, much to his dismay. An optional, late-game cutscene and the lack of anyone else in the entire world, including Cyan's hometown and family speaking this way imply this is an affectation that he adopts, rather than his normal speech.

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