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*** The trope image depicts her in the ''Renew Your Vows'' reality, first appearing in ''ComicBook/SecretWars2015'', and actually subverts this, with her complaint is not so much about his being Spidey, but his workload. Specifically, she's remarking that under the circumstances, the other heroes should be taking up the slack for Peter. As it was, the heroes in question had been killed by the Regent, though no one was aware at the time. Additionally, she keeps her cool when Venom comes after her and baby Annie, actually ''luring him into a burning building'' to exploit Venom's vulnerability to fire, she's the one who later encourages him to once more take up the Spidey mask despite the risks that come with it, and she also uses the prototype Regent suit to help fight Regent, and ''then'' later becomes a superhero in her own right alongside Peter.

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*** The trope image depicts her in the ''Renew Your Vows'' reality, first appearing in ''ComicBook/SecretWars2015'', and actually subverts this, with her complaint is not so much about his being Spidey, but his workload. Specifically, she's remarking that under the circumstances, the other heroes should be taking up the slack for Peter. As it was, the heroes in question had been killed by the Regent, though no one was aware at the time. Additionally, she keeps her cool when Venom comes after her and baby Annie, actually ''luring him into a burning building'' to exploit Venom's vulnerability to fire, she's the one who later encourages him to once more take up the Spidey mask despite the risks that come with it, and she also uses the prototype Regent suit to help fight Regent, and ''then'' later becomes a superhero in her own right alongside Peter.

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[[folder:Web Video]]
* ''WebVideo/ExtraCredits'': During their "Extra History" segment on the 100-Years War, they mention that the standard role of a King and Queen (especially during wartime) was for the King to make harsh and ruthless decisions, but the queen to plead for more merciful or diplomatic measures. This was done in order for the King to appear strong and to remain feared and respected, and only "tempered" because of his wife.
[[/folder]]


The Wet Blanket Wife is the LoveInterest (not necessarily a married spouse) that is [[DoNotDoThisCoolThing a constant reminder of how uncool or troubling events in the story are supposed to be.]] In TheCaper, she reminds TheHero that he promised to retire after that OneLastJob, or is trying to get him out of the game to begin with. In a War Film or FightingSeries, she's often an ActualPacifist who wants her love to stop fighting because she doesn't want to see him hurt or killed. In a police story, she wants her husband to spend more time at home and less working cases, despite knowing what he did before she married him and that he doesn't control when a crime occurs. In a {{Superhero}} story, she chews the main character out for spending too much time crimefighting, or perhaps doesn't even ''know'' his SecretIdentity and angrily wonders where he's run off to. In short, [[StockCharacter the character exists]] to [[ActionFilmQuietDramaScene slow the pace of the story]] and [[{{Angst}} provide emotional heft.]]

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The Wet Blanket Wife is the LoveInterest (not necessarily a married spouse) that is [[DoNotDoThisCoolThing a constant reminder of how uncool or troubling events in the story are supposed to be.]] In TheCaper, she reminds TheHero that he promised to retire after that OneLastJob, or is trying to get him out of the game to begin with. In a War Film or FightingSeries, she's often an ActualPacifist who wants her love to stop fighting because she doesn't want to see him hurt or killed. In a police story, she wants her husband to spend more time at home and less working cases, despite knowing what he did before she married him and that he doesn't control when a crime occurs. In a {{Superhero}} story, she chews the main character out for spending too much time crimefighting, crimefighting or perhaps doesn't even ''know'' his SecretIdentity and angrily wonders where he's run off to. In short, [[StockCharacter the character exists]] to [[ActionFilmQuietDramaScene slow the pace of the story]] and [[{{Angst}} provide emotional heft.]]



This is an AlwaysFemale trope, but that doesn't mean there aren't rare male versions. Because of tropes like MenAreTough and MenActWomenAre, it's usually just assumed that a husband or boyfriend in a heteronormative relationship will be the one advancing the plot. For that reason, this is also a SubTrope of AcceptableFeminineGoals; in this case, trying to salvage her relationship/marriage/home is the greater priority for the woman than whatever else is supposed to be going on in the story. Again, even if she's ''right'', the issue is that the husband doesn't seem to agree (and more often than not, the story is told from his perspective). At worst, she's an unsympathetic character because if the hero listens to her and gives up heroing, people will die.

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This is an AlwaysFemale trope, but that doesn't mean there aren't rare male versions. Because of tropes like MenAreTough and MenActWomenAre, it's usually just assumed that a husband or boyfriend in a heteronormative relationship will be the one advancing the plot. For that reason, this is also a SubTrope of AcceptableFeminineGoals; in this case, trying to salvage her relationship/marriage/home is the greater priority for the woman than whatever else is supposed to be going on in the story. Again, even if she's ''right'', the issue is that the husband doesn't seem to agree (and more often than not, the story is told from his perspective). At worst, she's an unsympathetic character because if the hero listens to her and gives up heroing, being a hero, people will die.



* ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'': During the Arrancar Arc, Orihime was constantly worried about Ichigo getting hurt or injured fighting on her behalf, even refusing to heal Ichigo if it meant he'd just start fighting again. Her behaviour is so pacifistic for a genre that caters to fans who want to read fights that her lack of battle-appropriate mentality is lampshaded in-universe as well. [[spoiler: She does seem to mellow out by the time the two are actually married though.]] This is a JustifiedTrope with her, as Orihime was a normal, fifteen-year-old human girl until Ichigo awakened her powers, so she will of course be averse to the violence that the Shinigami and arrancar characters display, especially as her powers involve healing and protecting her friends, meaning she often has to witness her close friends and allies horribly wounded.

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* ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'': During the Arrancar Arc, Orihime was constantly worried about Ichigo getting hurt or injured fighting on her behalf, even refusing to heal Ichigo if it meant he'd just start fighting again. Her behaviour is so pacifistic for a genre that caters to fans who want to read fights that her lack of battle-appropriate mentality is lampshaded in-universe as well. [[spoiler: She does seem to mellow out by the time the two are actually married though.]] This is a JustifiedTrope with her, as Orihime was a normal, fifteen-year-old human girl until Ichigo awakened her powers, so she will will, of course course, be averse to the violence that the Shinigami and arrancar characters display, especially as her powers involve healing and protecting her friends, meaning she often has to witness her close friends and allies horribly wounded.



** Chi-Chi is constantly pushing Gohan towards more scholarly pursuits, despite living in a world where her husband seems to fight world- or universe-threatening bad guys every few years or so. She remains against all the danger her husband and son go through, but learns to adapt. After the seven-year TimeSkip, she mellows out a bit with their second son, Goten, to the point where she actually trained him. This may have something to do with Goku dying shortly before he was born, since Gohan theorizes that Chi-Chi [[MyGreatestFailure feels guilt over this behavior]] now that Goku's gone and believes she might have had an indirect effect on his death. In ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'', she's back to nagging Goku now that he's alive again, forcing him to take up farming to provide to the family; when Mr. Satan gave Goku an enormous cash prize for saving the world from Majin Buu, Chi-Chi lied about spending it all because she wanted Goku to keep working.
*** In the beginning of DBZ, she noted she wanted Gohan to become a scholar because of wanting to solve problems non-violently and in her defense, Goku was pretty much the strongest man in the world in early Dragonball Z. Had the Saiyans or alien threats not arrive, there wouldn't be a reason for this sort of stuff (barring perhaps the Red Ribbon Androids.)

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** Chi-Chi is constantly pushing Gohan towards more scholarly pursuits, despite living in a world where her husband seems to fight world- or universe-threatening bad guys every few years or so. She remains against all the danger her husband and son go through, through but learns to adapt. After the seven-year TimeSkip, she mellows out a bit with their second son, Goten, to the point where she actually trained him. This may have something to do with Goku dying shortly before he was born, born since Gohan theorizes that Chi-Chi [[MyGreatestFailure feels guilt over this behavior]] now that Goku's gone and believes she might have had an indirect effect on his death. In ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'', she's back to nagging Goku now that he's alive again, forcing him to take up farming to provide to the family; when Mr. Satan gave Goku an enormous cash prize for saving the world from Majin Buu, Chi-Chi lied about spending it all because she wanted Goku to keep working.
*** In At the beginning of DBZ, she noted she wanted Gohan to become a scholar because of wanting to solve problems non-violently and in her defense, Goku was pretty much the strongest man in the world in early Dragonball Z. Had the Saiyans or alien threats not arrive, there wouldn't be a reason for this sort of stuff (barring perhaps the Red Ribbon Androids.)



* ''Film/RoboCop2014'': [[NeverTrustATrailer Oddly enough]], Clara Murphy's actions, which are the focus of the TropeNamer ''Cracked'' article, are not only ''[[AvertedTrope not]]'' an example of this trope, but make sense within the film: Alex Murphy is undergoing a ''corporate mandated'' CyberneticsEatYourSoul and she shocks him out of it, she fights for her husband's rights, and later on when Omnicorp tries to ruin her reputation because of this and even threatens to find a legal way to ''leave her homeless'' in retaliation, her response is essentially "BringIt".

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* ''Film/RoboCop2014'': [[NeverTrustATrailer Oddly enough]], Clara Murphy's actions, which are the focus of the TropeNamer ''Cracked'' article, are not only ''[[AvertedTrope not]]'' an example of this trope, but make sense within the film: Alex Murphy is undergoing a ''corporate mandated'' CyberneticsEatYourSoul and she shocks him out of it, she fights for her husband's rights, and later on when Omnicorp tries to ruin her reputation because of this and even threatens to find a legal way to ''leave her homeless'' in retaliation, her response is essentially more or less "BringIt".



* ''Film/TheFinestHours'' provides a nice subversion in Miriam. Her repeated, forceful demands that the rescue effort to save the crew of the ''Pendleton'' be called off to keep her fiance Bernie out of danger are refused by Bernie's C.O. She gets kicked out of the Coast Guard station over the ensuing argument, and on the way home she hits a snowbank and is bailed out by a worried housewife and her children, whose father is trapped on the sinking ship. This gives Miriam a much-needed reality check that she is ''not'' the only person out there with a loved one's life hanging in the balance, and that as dangerous as Bernie's mission is, a lot of other ladies will definitely become widows if he doesn't at least make the attempt. She then bands together with the other wives to lend support to one another and help their endangered menfolk however they can.
* Downplayed in the ''Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse'': While at first Pepper Potts seemed fine with Tony's Iron Man alter ego, following his near-death in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' and the destruction of their home, she urges Tony to quit. While Tony actually does quit, he is unable to remain on the sidelines and goes back to the field, despite the events of Iron Man 3 and beyond, which ended their relationship. They have gotten back together and are engaged by the end of ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming,'' though ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar'' shows that she's still trying to convince Tony to give up heroing. Come ''Film/AvengersEndgame'',[[spoiler: in the five year timeskip following Thanos' decimation of half of all life, when Tony admits to her that he may have found a way to undo all the deaths and decides to simply shelf it in favor of living out the rest of his days with her and their daughter, she's now the one who convinces him to go through with the Avengers' plan, knowing that not doing so will haunt him forever, so he'll never truly be at peace. It's also why her final words to him after his HeroicSacrifice is the assurance that he did everything he could do, so he can finally rest.]]

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* ''Film/TheFinestHours'' provides a nice subversion in Miriam. Her repeated, forceful demands that the rescue effort to save the crew of the ''Pendleton'' be called off to keep her fiance Bernie out of danger are refused by Bernie's C.O. She gets kicked out of the Coast Guard station over the ensuing argument, and on the way home home, she hits a snowbank and is bailed out by a worried housewife and her children, whose father is trapped on the sinking ship. This gives Miriam a much-needed reality check that she is ''not'' the only person out there with a loved one's life hanging in the balance, and that as dangerous as Bernie's mission is, a lot of other ladies will definitely become widows if he doesn't at least make the attempt. She then bands together with the other wives to lend support to one another and help their endangered menfolk however they can.
* Downplayed in the ''Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse'': While at first Pepper Potts seemed fine with Tony's Iron Man alter ego, following his near-death in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' and the destruction of their home, she urges Tony to quit. While Tony actually does quit, he is unable to remain on the sidelines and goes back to the field, despite the events of Iron Man 3 and beyond, which ended their relationship. They have gotten back together and are engaged by the end of ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming,'' though ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar'' shows that she's still trying to convince Tony to give up heroing. Come ''Film/AvengersEndgame'',[[spoiler: in the five year timeskip five-year time skip following Thanos' decimation of half of all life, when Tony admits to her that he may have found a way to undo all the deaths and decides to simply shelf it in favor of living out the rest of his days with her and their daughter, she's now the one who convinces him to go through with the Avengers' plan, knowing that not doing so will haunt him forever, so he'll never truly be at peace. It's also why her final words to him after his HeroicSacrifice is the assurance that he did everything he could do, so he can finally rest.]]



* Jill Taylor of ''Series/HomeImprovement'': Even though the series tries to present her as the OnlySaneMan, she comes across more and more as the series progresses as a spoiled, nagging shrew. During one episode she interrupts Tim while filming his TV show on location (you know, the ONLY source of income for a five person household) because nobody wants to spend any time with her.

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* Jill Taylor of ''Series/HomeImprovement'': Even though the series tries to present her as the OnlySaneMan, she comes across more and more as the series progresses as a spoiled, nagging shrew. During one episode she interrupts Tim while filming his TV show on location (you know, the ONLY source of income for a five person five-person household) because nobody wants to spend any time with her.



* ''WesternAnimation/DanVs'' subverts this in "Dan vs. The Wolf-Man". The start of the episode paints Elise as this, with Chris mentioning that she doesn't like him hanging out with Dan. But a scene shortly afterwards clarifies: Elise just wants her husband to be less of a doormat, and apparently he mistook "Stop letting Dan step all over you" for "You can't hang out with Dan anymore." Elise is actually an elite super spy with BloodKnight tendencies; on occasion she's been known to actively join in on Dan's elaborate revenge plots, then Chris has to be the wet blanket.

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* ''WesternAnimation/DanVs'' subverts this in "Dan vs. The Wolf-Man". The start of the episode paints Elise as this, with Chris mentioning that she doesn't like him hanging out with Dan. But a scene shortly afterwards clarifies: Elise just wants her husband to be less of a doormat, and apparently he mistook "Stop letting Dan step all over you" for "You can't hang out with Dan anymore." Elise is actually an elite super spy with BloodKnight tendencies; on occasion occasion, she's been known to actively join in on Dan's elaborate revenge plots, then Chris has to be the wet blanket.


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* Jill Taylor of ''Series/HomeImprovement'': Even though the series tries to present her as the OnlySaneMan, she comes across more and more as the series progresses as a spoiled, nagging shrew. During one episode she interrupts Tim while filming his TV show on location (you know, the ONLY source of income for a five person household) because nobody wants to spend any time with her.


** Gwen Stacy as Peter's girlfriend was this when she was alive. Her relationship with Peter was strained by the fact that she liked Peter but hated Spider-Man. Peter loved her but constantly had to lie to her since the minute he told her the truth he would lose her. Indeed one attempt to confess his identity to his friends which Peter later passed as a prank confirmed these views since Gwen became hysterical at the idea of Peter as a superhero. The one situation that could have helped them out, namely the fact that her father George Stacy approved of Peter and Spider-Man and was his SecretKeeper was lost when George Stacy died in an accident and Gwen blamed Spider-Man for the death of her beloved father, and Peter's guilt felt worse than ever. As such readers got annoyed by Gwen for her whiny nature, her irrational fear and grief-stricken rage at Spider-Man, and for the fact that whenever Peter contemplated a future he just felt incredibly guilty. Then she died and Peter lost her, felt guilty for one big major failure rather than everyday while he was with her, and moved on to his real love interest.
** ComicBook/MaryJaneWatson, despite her appearance in the trope image, was initially an aversion. When she and Peter first met, she immediately drove Peter to see the Rhino battle and basically had an adventurous attitude to superheroics in many of her early appearances, openly liking both Peter and Spider-Man. Years later, it was revealed that she had known Peter was Spider-Man all along and later became his confidant, and after they got married she told Peter that she couldn't stand being a "policeman's wife" i.e. lying awake at night wondering if Peter would return or not. Since Spider-Man is presented a {{Everyman}}, some writers were constantly looking for ways to make being married to a supermodel suck (though MJ didn't stay a supermodel for long) and also to add legitimate tension to their marriage since MJ is right to be concerned that Peter could die, while in ''ComicBook/KravensLastHunt'', Peter's brief "death" and disappearance and MJ's inability to discuss Peter's real reasons for it add believable emotional stakes to their relationship. Other comics involved MJ being little else than a DamselInDistress, constantly nagging Peter for spending too much time superheroing or interrupting the action by cutting back to her just so we could watch her angst. This was especially the case in the "ComicBook/MaximumCarnage" storyarc in the 90s.

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** Gwen Stacy as Peter's girlfriend was this when she was alive. Her relationship with Peter was strained by the fact that she liked Peter but hated Spider-Man. Peter loved her but constantly had to lie to her since the minute he told her the truth he would lose her. Indeed one attempt to confess his identity to his friends which Peter later passed as a prank confirmed these views since Gwen became hysterical at the idea of Peter as a superhero. The one situation that could have helped them out, namely the fact that her father George Stacy approved of Peter and Spider-Man and was his SecretKeeper was lost when George Stacy died in an accident and Gwen blamed Spider-Man for the death of her beloved father, and Peter's guilt felt worse than ever. As such readers got annoyed by Gwen for her whiny nature, her irrational fear and grief-stricken rage at Spider-Man, and for the fact that whenever Peter contemplated a future he just felt incredibly guilty. Then she died and Peter lost her, felt guilty for one big major failure rather than everyday every day while he was with her, and moved on to his real love interest.
** ComicBook/MaryJaneWatson, despite her appearance in the trope image, ComicBook/MaryJaneWatson was initially an aversion. When she and Peter first met, she immediately drove Peter to see the Rhino battle and basically had an adventurous attitude to superheroics in many of her early appearances, openly liking both Peter and Spider-Man. Years later, it was revealed that she had known Peter was Spider-Man all along and later became his confidant, and after they got married she told Peter that she couldn't stand being a "policeman's wife" i.e. lying awake at night wondering if Peter would return or not. Since Spider-Man is presented a {{Everyman}}, some writers were constantly looking for ways to make being married to a supermodel suck (though MJ didn't stay a supermodel for long) and also to add legitimate tension to their marriage since MJ is right to be concerned that Peter could die, while in ''ComicBook/KravensLastHunt'', Peter's brief "death" and disappearance and MJ's inability to discuss Peter's real reasons for it add believable emotional stakes to their relationship. Other comics involved MJ being little else than a DamselInDistress, constantly nagging Peter for spending too much time superheroing or interrupting the action by cutting back to her just so we could watch her angst. This was especially the case in the "ComicBook/MaximumCarnage" storyarc story arc in the 90s.



* ''Both'' mothers in ''Film/BendItLikeBeckham'', and for basically the same reason. Jess' mom doesn't want her playing football/soccer because of Punjabi Sikh/British CultureClash (read: Indian girls aren't supposed to play football). Jules' mom doesn't like Jules' tomboy tendencies and thinks she isn't feminine enough, and gets mad at Dad for encouraging her:

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* ''Both'' mothers in ''Film/BendItLikeBeckham'', and for basically the same reason. Jess' mom doesn't want her playing football/soccer because of Punjabi Sikh/British CultureClash (read: Indian girls aren't supposed to play football). Jules' mom doesn't like Jules' tomboy tendencies and thinks she isn't feminine enough, enough and gets mad at Dad for encouraging her:



* Downplayed in the ''Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse'': While at first Pepper Potts seemed fine with Tony's Iron Man alter ego, following his near-death in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' and the destruction of their home, she urges Tony to quit. While Tony actually does quit, he is unable to remain on the sidelines and goes back to the field, despite the events of Iron Man 3 and beyond, which ended their relationship. They have gotten back together and are engaged by the end of ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming,'' though ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar'' shows that she's still trying to convince Tony to give up heroing. Come ''Film/AvengersEndgame'',[[spoiler: in the five year timeskip following Thanos' decimation of half of all life, when Tony admits to her that he may have found a way to undo all the deaths and decides to simply shelf it in favor of living out the rest of his days with her and their daughter, she's now the one who convinces him to go through with the Avengers' plan, knowing that not doing so will haunt him forever, so he'll never truly be at peace. It's also why her final words to him after his HeroicSacrifice is assurance that he did everything he could do, so he can finally rest.]]

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* Downplayed in the ''Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse'': While at first Pepper Potts seemed fine with Tony's Iron Man alter ego, following his near-death in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' and the destruction of their home, she urges Tony to quit. While Tony actually does quit, he is unable to remain on the sidelines and goes back to the field, despite the events of Iron Man 3 and beyond, which ended their relationship. They have gotten back together and are engaged by the end of ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming,'' though ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar'' shows that she's still trying to convince Tony to give up heroing. Come ''Film/AvengersEndgame'',[[spoiler: in the five year timeskip following Thanos' decimation of half of all life, when Tony admits to her that he may have found a way to undo all the deaths and decides to simply shelf it in favor of living out the rest of his days with her and their daughter, she's now the one who convinces him to go through with the Avengers' plan, knowing that not doing so will haunt him forever, so he'll never truly be at peace. It's also why her final words to him after his HeroicSacrifice is the assurance that he did everything he could do, so he can finally rest.]]



* ''VideoGame/FarCry3''. Liza Snow, girlfriend of protagonist Jason Brody, constantly expresses concern over how Jason is becoming more and more of a bloodthirsty killer. The rest of Jason's friends also get on his case for the insane things he does, but at the same time, they'd be dead if he didn't, and more importantly, we'd have no game if he didn't. However, Liza is by far the most blatant example. [[spoiler:She turns out to be totally right, as Jason almost sails off the deep end (or actually does, if you choose the BadEnding).]]

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* ''VideoGame/FarCry3''. Liza Snow, the girlfriend of protagonist Jason Brody, constantly expresses concern over how Jason is becoming more and more of a bloodthirsty killer. The rest of Jason's friends also get on his case for the insane things he does, but at the same time, they'd be dead if he didn't, and more importantly, we'd have no game if he didn't. However, Liza is by far the most blatant example. [[spoiler:She turns out to be totally right, as Jason almost sails off the deep end (or actually does, if you choose the BadEnding).]]



** Amanda De Santa, wife of the other protagonist Michael, eventually leaves him and leaves behind a note basically saying that she's afraid for herself and their children after Michael returns to a life of crime and brings back all of their old baggage. When the two start reconciling at the end, her primary complaint is that she hates his behavior and lifestyle because she doesn't want Michael to get killed.

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** Amanda De Santa, the wife of the other protagonist Michael, eventually leaves him and leaves behind a note basically saying that she's afraid for herself and their children after Michael returns to a life of crime and brings back all of their old baggage. When the two start reconciling at the end, her primary complaint is that she hates his behavior and lifestyle because she doesn't want Michael to get killed.



* ''VideoGame/{{Uncharted}}'' ''3'' and ''4'' has Nate and Elena having marital problems because Nate simply can't stop being a DoomMagnet. Much of the final part of the game has Elena trying to avert this trope and encouraging Nate to take a potentially risky job in Malaysia while Nate demurs because he doesn't want to go adventuring again. [[spoiler:In the end, Nate and Elena resolve this by becoming legal archaeologists, and full time partners and co-workers]].

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* ''VideoGame/{{Uncharted}}'' ''3'' and ''4'' has Nate and Elena having marital problems because Nate simply can't stop being a DoomMagnet. Much of the final part of the game has Elena trying to avert this trope and encouraging Nate to take a potentially risky job in Malaysia while Nate demurs because he doesn't want to go adventuring again. [[spoiler:In the end, Nate and Elena resolve this by becoming legal archaeologists, and full time full-time partners and co-workers]].



* Princess Sally of ''WesternAnimation/SonicSatam'' is a downplayed unmarried example. She's humorless, uptight and constantly on Sonic's back for showing off, but in a dystopian world where his recklessness often risks getting him robotocized or worse by an sadistic EvilOverlord, she's usually in the right to. She started off similar in the comic books, though became more easygoing after a while.

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* Princess Sally of ''WesternAnimation/SonicSatam'' is a downplayed unmarried example. She's humorless, uptight and constantly on Sonic's back for showing off, but in a dystopian world where his recklessness often risks getting him robotocized or worse by an a sadistic EvilOverlord, she's usually in the right to. She started off similar in the comic books, though became more easygoing after a while.


** ComicBook/MaryJaneWatson was initially an aversion. When she and Peter first met, she immediately drove Peter to see the Rhino battle and basically had an adventurous attitude to superheroics in many of her early appearances, openly liking both Peter and Spider-Man. Years later, it was revealed that she had known Peter was Spider-Man all along and later became his confidant, and after they got married she told Peter that she couldn't stand being a "policeman's wife" i.e. lying awake at night wondering if Peter would return or not. Since Spider-Man is presented a {{Everyman}}, some writers were constantly looking for ways to make being married to a supermodel suck (though MJ didn't stay a supermodel for long) and also to add legitimate tension to their marriage since MJ is right to be concerned that Peter could die, while in ''ComicBook/KravensLastHunt'', Peter's brief "death" and disappearance and MJ's inability to discuss Peter's real reasons for it add believable emotional stakes to their relationship. Other comics involved MJ being little else than a DamselInDistress, constantly nagging Peter for spending too much time superheroing or interrupting the action by cutting back to her just so we could watch her angst. This was especially the case in the "ComicBook/MaximumCarnage" storyarc in the 90s. Other writers remember her original characterization balance this out by pointing out that MJ does love being with Spider-Man and loves it especially when Peter takes her swinging and that she has her good days and bad days. Other writers such as JMS and Tom Beland tried to avert this and insist that while MJ did have these fears it also stemmed from her fears of helplessness about not being able to fully be part of Peter's world, a situation remedied when she and Peter moved to Avengers Tower, and when Peter gifted her his own special web-shooters for Valentine's day which thrilled and delighted her. Creator/MattFraction's "To Have and to Hold" was intended by him to demolish this trope:

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** ComicBook/MaryJaneWatson ComicBook/MaryJaneWatson, despite her appearance in the trope image, was initially an aversion. When she and Peter first met, she immediately drove Peter to see the Rhino battle and basically had an adventurous attitude to superheroics in many of her early appearances, openly liking both Peter and Spider-Man. Years later, it was revealed that she had known Peter was Spider-Man all along and later became his confidant, and after they got married she told Peter that she couldn't stand being a "policeman's wife" i.e. lying awake at night wondering if Peter would return or not. Since Spider-Man is presented a {{Everyman}}, some writers were constantly looking for ways to make being married to a supermodel suck (though MJ didn't stay a supermodel for long) and also to add legitimate tension to their marriage since MJ is right to be concerned that Peter could die, while in ''ComicBook/KravensLastHunt'', Peter's brief "death" and disappearance and MJ's inability to discuss Peter's real reasons for it add believable emotional stakes to their relationship. Other comics involved MJ being little else than a DamselInDistress, constantly nagging Peter for spending too much time superheroing or interrupting the action by cutting back to her just so we could watch her angst. This was especially the case in the "ComicBook/MaximumCarnage" storyarc in the 90s.
***
Other writers remember her original characterization balance this out by pointing out that MJ does love being with Spider-Man and loves it especially when Peter takes her swinging and that she has her good days and bad days. Other writers such as JMS and Tom Beland tried to avert this and insist that while MJ did have these fears it also stemmed from her fears of helplessness about not being able to fully be part of Peter's world, a situation remedied when she and Peter moved to Avengers Tower, and when Peter gifted her his own special web-shooters for Valentine's day which thrilled and delighted her. Creator/MattFraction's "To Have and to Hold" was intended by him to demolish this trope:


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*** The trope image depicts her in the ''Renew Your Vows'' reality, first appearing in ''ComicBook/SecretWars2015'', and actually subverts this, with her complaint is not so much about his being Spidey, but his workload. Specifically, she's remarking that under the circumstances, the other heroes should be taking up the slack for Peter. As it was, the heroes in question had been killed by the Regent, though no one was aware at the time. Additionally, she keeps her cool when Venom comes after her and baby Annie, actually ''luring him into a burning building'' to exploit Venom's vulnerability to fire, she's the one who later encourages him to once more take up the Spidey mask despite the risks that come with it, and she also uses the prototype Regent suit to help fight Regent, and ''then'' later becomes a superhero in her own right alongside Peter.


* Downplayed in the ''Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse'': While at first Pepper Potts seemed fine with Tony's Iron Man alter ego, following his near-death in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' and the destruction of their home, she urges Tony to quit. While Tony actually does quit, he is unable to remain on the sidelines and goes back to the field, despite the events of Iron Man 3 and beyond, which ended their relationship. They have gotten back together and are engaged by the end of ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming,'' though ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar'' shows that she's still trying to convince Tony to give up heroing.

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* Downplayed in the ''Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse'': While at first Pepper Potts seemed fine with Tony's Iron Man alter ego, following his near-death in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' and the destruction of their home, she urges Tony to quit. While Tony actually does quit, he is unable to remain on the sidelines and goes back to the field, despite the events of Iron Man 3 and beyond, which ended their relationship. They have gotten back together and are engaged by the end of ''Film/SpiderManHomecoming,'' though ''Film/AvengersInfinityWar'' shows that she's still trying to convince Tony to give up heroing. Come ''Film/AvengersEndgame'',[[spoiler: in the five year timeskip following Thanos' decimation of half of all life, when Tony admits to her that he may have found a way to undo all the deaths and decides to simply shelf it in favor of living out the rest of his days with her and their daughter, she's now the one who convinces him to go through with the Avengers' plan, knowing that not doing so will haunt him forever, so he'll never truly be at peace. It's also why her final words to him after his HeroicSacrifice is assurance that he did everything he could do, so he can finally rest.]]


* ''ComicBook/XMen'': ComicBook/{{Cyclops}} and ComicBook/MadelynePryor slammed into this trope the moment she became a wife and mother. Beforehand, Madelyne had been presented as a patient and understanding woman who had her own adventurous side as a cargo pilot. However, after she became married and settle down as a housewife, she began incensed that Cyclops spent all his time as an X-Man instead at home helping to raise their son, even though she ''knew'' that the purpose of the team was to stem the growing bigotry towards mutants and that Cyclops' leadership was often the only thing that kept his closest friends from being killed. Things escalated to the point that when ComicBook/JeanGrey was discovered alive, Cyclops felt obligated to spend time reconnecting with her rather than fix his strained marriage. This finally culminated in Madelyne giving Cyclops an ultimatum between their marriage and the X-Men, and leaving when he ignored it.

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* ''ComicBook/XMen'': ComicBook/{{Cyclops}} and ComicBook/MadelynePryor slammed into this trope the moment she became a wife and mother. Beforehand, Madelyne had been presented as a patient and understanding woman who had her own adventurous side as a cargo pilot. However, after she became married and settle down as a housewife, she began incensed complaining that Cyclops spent all his time as an X-Man instead at home helping to raise their son, even though she ''knew'' that the purpose of the team was to stem the growing bigotry towards mutants and that Cyclops' leadership was often the only thing that kept his closest friends from being killed. Things escalated to the point that when ComicBook/JeanGrey was discovered alive, Cyclops felt obligated to spend time reconnecting with her rather than fix his strained marriage. This finally culminated in Madelyne giving Cyclops an ultimatum between their marriage and the X-Men, and leaving when he ignored it.

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* ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' parodies this with Angel, Every Boxer's Girlfriend from Every Movie about Boxing Ever, who throws emotional tirades over her boyfriend's career, threatening to take the kids to her sister's, and also over unrelated things, like Apple releasing upgraded iPhones.

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* ''ComicBook/XMen'': ComicBook/{{Cyclops}} and ComicBook/MadelynePryor slammed into this trope the moment she became a wife and mother. Beforehand, Madelyne had been presented as a patient and understanding woman who had her own adventurous side as a cargo pilot. However, after she became married and settle down as a housewife, she began incensed that Cyclops spent all his time as an X-Man instead at home helping to raise their son, even though she ''knew'' that the purpose of the team was to stem the growing bigotry towards mutants and that Cyclops' leadership was often the only thing that kept his closest friends from being killed. Things escalated to the point that when ComicBook/JeanGrey was discovered alive, Cyclops felt obligated to spend time reconnecting with her rather than fix his strained marriage. This finally culminated in Madelyne giving Cyclops an ultimatum between their marriage and the X-Men, and leaving when he ignored it.


** ComicBook/MaryJaneWatson was initially an aversion. When she and Peter first met, she immediately drove Peter to see the Rhino battle and basically had an adventurous attitude to superheroics in many of her early appearances, openly liking both Peter and Spider-Man. Since Spider-Man is intended to be a downtrodden {{Everyman}}, some writers were constantly looking for ways to make being married to a supermodel suck. Many comics involved MJ being little else than a DamselInDistress, constantly nagging Peter for spending too much time superheroing or interrupting the action by cutting back to her just so we could watch her angst. This was especially the case in the "ComicBook/MaximumCarnage" storyarc in the 90s, where she had no part in the plot except to cut back to her angsting in this manner. Some speculate this to be part of the reason the writers ''and'' some portions of the {{fandom}} tried so hard to break them up.

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** ComicBook/MaryJaneWatson was initially an aversion. When she and Peter first met, she immediately drove Peter to see the Rhino battle and basically had an adventurous attitude to superheroics in many of her early appearances, openly liking both Peter and Spider-Man. Years later, it was revealed that she had known Peter was Spider-Man all along and later became his confidant, and after they got married she told Peter that she couldn't stand being a "policeman's wife" i.e. lying awake at night wondering if Peter would return or not. Since Spider-Man is intended to be presented a downtrodden {{Everyman}}, some writers were constantly looking for ways to make being married to a supermodel suck. Many suck (though MJ didn't stay a supermodel for long) and also to add legitimate tension to their marriage since MJ is right to be concerned that Peter could die, while in ''ComicBook/KravensLastHunt'', Peter's brief "death" and disappearance and MJ's inability to discuss Peter's real reasons for it add believable emotional stakes to their relationship. Other comics involved MJ being little else than a DamselInDistress, constantly nagging Peter for spending too much time superheroing or interrupting the action by cutting back to her just so we could watch her angst. This was especially the case in the "ComicBook/MaximumCarnage" storyarc in the 90s, where she had no part in the plot except to cut back to 90s. Other writers remember her angsting in original characterization balance this manner. Some speculate out by pointing out that MJ does love being with Spider-Man and loves it especially when Peter takes her swinging and that she has her good days and bad days. Other writers such as JMS and Tom Beland tried to avert this and insist that while MJ did have these fears it also stemmed from her fears of helplessness about not being able to fully be part of Peter's world, a situation remedied when she and Peter moved to Avengers Tower, and when Peter gifted her his own special web-shooters for Valentine's day which thrilled and delighted her. Creator/MattFraction's "To Have and to Hold" was intended by him to demolish this trope:
--> '''Matt Fraction''': "When his marriage with MJ worked, it worked very well, but sometimes it seemed like people didnít know what to do with MJ. Way too often MJ would be relegated to hostage or obstacle. Too seldom did she play
the reason the writers ''and'' some portions role of the {{fandom}} tried so hard to break them up.supporter, friend or nurturer."


* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'': Mary-Jane Watson developed a reputation for being this. Since Spider-Man is intended to be a downtrodden {{Everyman}}, some writers were constantly looking for ways to make being married to a supermodel suck. Many comics involved MJ being little else than a DamselInDistress, constantly nagging Peter for spending too much time superheroing or interrupting the action by cutting back to her just so we could watch her angst. This was especially the case in the "ComicBook/MaximumCarnage" storyarc in the 90s, where she had no part in the plot except to cut back to her angsting in this manner. Some speculate this to be part of the reason the writers ''and'' some portions of the {{fandom}} tried so hard to break them up.

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* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'': Mary-Jane Watson developed ''Franchise/SpiderMan''
** Gwen Stacy as Peter's girlfriend was this when she was alive. Her relationship with Peter was strained by the fact that she liked Peter but hated Spider-Man. Peter loved her but constantly had to lie to her since the minute he told her the truth he would lose her. Indeed one attempt to confess his identity to his friends which Peter later passed as
a reputation prank confirmed these views since Gwen became hysterical at the idea of Peter as a superhero. The one situation that could have helped them out, namely the fact that her father George Stacy approved of Peter and Spider-Man and was his SecretKeeper was lost when George Stacy died in an accident and Gwen blamed Spider-Man for being this.the death of her beloved father, and Peter's guilt felt worse than ever. As such readers got annoyed by Gwen for her whiny nature, her irrational fear and grief-stricken rage at Spider-Man, and for the fact that whenever Peter contemplated a future he just felt incredibly guilty. Then she died and Peter lost her, felt guilty for one big major failure rather than everyday while he was with her, and moved on to his real love interest.
** ComicBook/MaryJaneWatson was initially an aversion. When she and Peter first met, she immediately drove Peter to see the Rhino battle and basically had an adventurous attitude to superheroics in many of her early appearances, openly liking both Peter and Spider-Man.
Since Spider-Man is intended to be a downtrodden {{Everyman}}, some writers were constantly looking for ways to make being married to a supermodel suck. Many comics involved MJ being little else than a DamselInDistress, constantly nagging Peter for spending too much time superheroing or interrupting the action by cutting back to her just so we could watch her angst. This was especially the case in the "ComicBook/MaximumCarnage" storyarc in the 90s, where she had no part in the plot except to cut back to her angsting in this manner. Some speculate this to be part of the reason the writers ''and'' some portions of the {{fandom}} tried so hard to break them up.


* ''Film/FaceOff''. Eve Archer, the wife of protagonist Simon Archer, is one of those "you promised to quit after one last job" types of wives. What makes this example particularly strange is that not only does she seem to show no interest in bringing to justice the BigBad responsible for killing her son, but Archer doesn't even try to explain to her that there's a nuclear bomb threatening to blow up their city. The movie just sets up Archer as a workaholic cop with a distant marriage and expects it to fly.

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* ''Film/FaceOff''. Eve Archer, the wife of protagonist Simon Archer, is one of those "you promised to quit after one last job" types of wives. What makes this example particularly strange is that not only does she seem to show no interest in bringing to justice the BigBad responsible for killing her son, but Archer doesn't even try to explain to her that there's a nuclear bomb threatening to blow up their city.city (he may (and it's a big "may") not want to scare her, but seriously, "Castor Troy gloated to me that he put a terrorist plan, which is going to happen in two weeks if we don't stop it, in motion before I knocked him into a coma, and now I need to help find it" could have worked). The movie just sets up Archer as a workaholic cop with a distant marriage and expects it to fly.

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* Played for laughs in ''Film/WalkHard'', in which practically every single line of dialogue Dewey Cox's first wife has to him is nagging him about how his dreams of musical success are futile and doomed to success, despite how increasingly successful he becomes. It gets to the point where he's recording number ones and playing sold-out gigs across the country and she's ''still'' telling him to give up this hopeless dream of becoming a successful musician.

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