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In 'miniature' games players use highly detailed miniatures, which fight over modelled terrain which could be compared to "low-res dioramas" of railway modellers. Because they are not static (often needing to be packed away at the end of the game) they lack the finer detail. However effort is made to accurately represent the terrain effects. Miniature games do not have a CRT like board games (see below); dice roll represent the "hits" taken by the target, either actual casualties, or something like morale. Movement is regulated by tape measures, with modifiers for terrain :- "Cavalry 20 cm, movement in woods counts x2"

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In 'miniature' games players use highly detailed miniatures, which fight over modelled terrain which could be compared to "low-res dioramas" of railway modellers. Because they are not static (often needing to be packed away at the end of the game) they lack the finer detail. However effort is made to accurately represent the terrain effects. Miniature games do not have a CRT like board games (see below); dice roll represent the "hits" taken by the target, either actual casualties, or something like morale.morale loss. Movement is regulated by tape measures, with modifiers for terrain :- "Cavalry 20 cm, movement in woods counts x2"

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Pure internet publications would say board gaming was more popular in the US, where as Europeans were more likely to play miniatures. However the US has a healthy miniature scene, and the hex map business suffered contraction, but now appears to be growing again.


A genre of {{tabletop games}} centering around the simulation of warfare, based on either real conflicts or fantasy scenarios. Some games include highly detailed miniatures and maps; however, most games of this genre consist of one or more maps of the theatre of conflict, a variable number of unit counters (small square pieces of heavy cardstock with printed numbers and symbols representing military units, as well as markers of various sorts), and rules with accompanying tables and charts. The most important such table is a "Combat Results Table", giving a set of battle results calculated according to the numerical odds of attacker versus defender; the players roll UsefulNotes/{{dice}} and compare the resulting numbers to the table to see how the battle came out. Table wargames can focus on any level of battle from literally man-to-man combat (e.g., the Squad Leader series) to whole army groups or fleets. {{Expansion Pack}}s with different scenarios are also common.

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A genre of {{tabletop games}} centering around the simulation of warfare, based on either real conflicts or fantasy scenarios. Some There are two basic genres.

In 'miniature'
games include players use highly detailed miniatures and maps; however, most miniatures, which fight over modelled terrain which could be compared to "low-res dioramas" of railway modellers. Because they are not static (often needing to be packed away at the end of the game) they lack the finer detail. However effort is made to accurately represent the terrain effects. Miniature games do not have a CRT like board games (see below); dice roll represent the "hits" taken by the target, either actual casualties, or something like morale. Movement is regulated by tape measures, with modifiers for terrain :- "Cavalry 20 cm, movement in woods counts x2"

Other
games of this genre consist of one or more maps of the theatre of conflict, a variable number of unit counters (small square pieces of heavy cardstock with printed numbers and symbols representing military units, as well as markers of various sorts), and rules with accompanying tables and charts. The most important such table is a "Combat Results Table", giving a set of battle results calculated according to the numerical odds of attacker versus defender; the players roll UsefulNotes/{{dice}} and compare the resulting numbers to the table to see how the battle came out. Table wargames can focus on any level of battle from literally man-to-man combat (e.g., the Squad Leader series) to whole army groups or fleets. {{Expansion Pack}}s with different scenarios are also common.
common.

Board games confine players to the map terrain and supplied units, where as miniatures allow for fictional battles as you can rearrange terrain and units to your wish.


* ''Afrika Korps''



* ''Campaign for North Africa''

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* ''Campaign for North Africa''Africa'' (featured on an episode of LiveActionTV/BigBangTheory)



* ''D-Day''



* ''Friedrich'' and ''Maria'' (European games covering the Seven Years' War and its predecessor the War of the Austrian Succession'')
* ''Gettysburg'' (published in multiple versions by Avalon Hill), as well as many, many other games on this most famous of American Civil War battles, including the legendary ''Terrible Swift Sword'')
* ''Great Battles of the American Civil War'' (originally published by SPI, as of 2019 by GMT)
* ''Great Campaigns of the American Civil War'' (operational/strategic treatments of major Civil War campaigns, published originally by Avalon Hill and as of 2019 by MMP)



* ''The Library of Napoleonic Battles'' (an ongoing series of games covering Napoleonic-era battles and campaigns)



* ''A Most Dangerous Time'' (originally published in Japan and brought to the US by MMP, covering the ''Sengoku Jidai'' of 1570-1584)



* ''The Third World War'' (a four-game series done in the 1980's by GDW covering the then-real possibility of full-scale conflict between NATO and the Warsaw Pact)



* ''War in Europe''

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* ''War Between the States''
* ''War in Europe''Europe'' and its companion ''War in the Pacific''


In the 1950's, Charles S. Roberts founded Avalon Hill and published ''Tactics II'', which is generally agreed to be the first modern board wargame. Until the late 1960's, Avalon Hill pretty much had a monopoly in this niche, and its games introduced most of the mechanics and concepts still used today in board wargaming. The great majority of wargames use a map with a hexagonal grid overlay, for instance; Roberts got the concept from a high-level professional wargame simulating nuclear warfare.



Since circa 2000, the board wargaming hobby has enjoyed something of a renaissance due, in part, to the revived popularity of tabletop games. Just as in the 1970's, games range in physical size from "folio" games (Decision Games has published several games that can use as few as 40 counters to represent all the units present at a given battle) to "monsters" with thousands of counters and numerous maps (e.g., Compass Games' ''Absolute Victory'', a grand-strategic-level treatment of World War II intended as a revamping and expansion of the Australian Design Group's classic ''World in Flames'', which covers not only the entire Western Hemisphere but even includes a map for Antarctica!). As of the late 2010's, Decision Games (which owns the SPI trademark and the copyrights to most of the classic SPI line), GMT Games, and Compass Games are the leading publishers in the hobby, augmented by smaller publishers such as Avalanche Press and One Small Step Games. These companies both publish new designs and re-print classic 1970's and 1980's games; for instance, Avalanche Press has republished the 1974 Avalon Hill classic ''Third Reich'' and paired it with an original design, ''The Great Pacific War'', covering the war in East Asia and the Pacific, which uses the same system as ''Third Reich'' and can be mated with the European game to present the entirety of World War II. Decision Games, which now owns the rights to publish SPI's legendary ''Strategy and Tactics'' magazine-with-game, publishes the magazine on a bimonthly basis, along with two other similar magazines with a more specific focus; ''World at War'', specializing in World War II, and ''Modern War'', focusing on contemporary and near-future conflict. Both of these magazines, like S&T, are available in magazine-only versions as well as versions with game supplements.

to:

Since circa 2000, the board wargaming hobby has enjoyed something of a renaissance due, in part, to the revived popularity of tabletop games. Just as in the 1970's, games range in physical size from "folio" games (Decision Games has published several games that can use as few as 40 counters to represent all the units present at a given battle) to "monsters" with thousands of counters and numerous maps (e.g., Compass Games' ''Absolute Victory'', a grand-strategic-level treatment of World War II intended as a revamping and expansion of the Australian Design Group's classic ''World in Flames'', which covers not only the entire Western Hemisphere but even includes a map for Antarctica!). As of the late 2010's, Decision Games (which owns the SPI trademark and the copyrights to most of the classic SPI line), GMT Games, and Compass Games are the leading publishers in the hobby, augmented by smaller publishers such as Avalanche Press Press, MMP (Multi-Man Productions, co-founded by baseball Hall of Famer Curt Schilling in order to keep ''Advanced Squad Leader'' in print), OSG (Operational Studies Group, which specializes almost exclusively in Napoleonic-era games) and One Small Step Games. These companies both publish new designs and re-print classic 1970's and 1980's games; for instance, Avalanche Press has republished the 1974 Avalon Hill classic ''Third Reich'' and paired it with an original design, ''The Great Pacific War'', covering the war in East Asia and the Pacific, which uses the same system as ''Third Reich'' and can be mated with the European game to present the entirety of World War II. GMT's own version of "Third Reich", "A World At War", is so popular that it has its own website.

Decision Games, which now owns the rights to publish SPI's legendary ''Strategy and Tactics'' magazine-with-game, publishes the magazine on a bimonthly basis, along with two other similar magazines with a more specific focus; ''World at War'', specializing in World War II, and ''Modern War'', focusing on contemporary and near-future conflict. Both of these magazines, like S&T, are available in magazine-only versions as well as versions with game supplements.
supplements. GMT is known for the high quality of its games' physical components, and is the publisher of one of the most popular of all board games, TabletopGames/TwilightStruggle, a two-player recreation of the Cold War. They're also the publishers of the highly popular COIN (Counterinsurgency) series, which covers insurgencies and rebellions throughout history from the Gallic Wars (''Falling Sky'') to Afghanistan (''A Distant Plain''). Compass Games has, in recent years, won praise for its reissues of classic games, which often are reworked by the original games' designers. Like Decision, both GMT ("C3I") and Compass ("Paper Wars") publish magazines with included games. The advent of inexpensive desktop publishing has also engendered a multitude of small publishers such as Hollandspiele, Revolution Games, Conflict Simulations Limited and High Flying Dice Games, which publish a wide range of games, often on subjects that might not be profitable for the major publishers to put out.


* ''Warmachine/Hordes''


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* ''Wings of Glory,'' an aerial combat simulator dealing with UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne planes
** ''Tripods & Triplanes,'' an expansion set that adds [[Literature/TheWarOfTheWorlds martian tripods]].


After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the game evolved again. The original ''Kriegsspiel'' used only symbolic blocks to represent units. ''Little Wars'' advocated use of what were then standard 54mm or 3.5" toy soldiers. in the 1950s, with the rise of firms such as Hinchcliffe or Spencer-Smith who sold 25mm or 1:72 scale metal figures, new thinkers such as the hugely influential Donald Featherstone (who had commanded tanks in North Africa and Italy) advocated far larger battles over the same size table using figures 3/4 of the size. Featherstone's new rule-sets and advocacy of using smaller scales also coincided with the rise in cheap, small, plastic figures, and construction kits of tanks and artillery; like those made with injection moulding by the Airfix brand.

to:

After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the game evolved again. The original ''Kriegsspiel'' used only symbolic blocks to represent units. ''Little Wars'' advocated use of what were then standard 54mm or 3.5" toy soldiers. in In the 1950s, with the rise of firms such as Hinchcliffe or Spencer-Smith who sold 25mm or 1:72 scale metal figures, new thinkers such as the hugely influential Donald Featherstone (who had commanded tanks in North Africa and Italy) advocated far larger battles over the same size table using figures 3/4 of the size. Featherstone's new rule-sets and advocacy of using smaller scales also coincided with the rise in cheap, small, plastic figures, and construction kits of tanks and artillery; like those made with injection moulding by the Airfix brand.



* ''TabletopGame/{{BrikWars}}''

to:

* ''TabletopGame/{{BrikWars}}''''TabletopGame/BrikWars''



* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}''

to:

* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}''''TabletopGame/Warhammer40000''


Since circa 2000, the board wargaming hobby has enjoyed something of a renaissance due, in part, to the revived popularity of tabletop games. As of the late 2010's, Decision Games (which owns the SPI trademark and the copyrights to most of the classic SPI line), GMT Games, and Compass Games are the leading publishers in the hobby, augmented by smaller publishers such as Avalanche Press and One Small Step Games. These companies both publish new designs and re-print classic 1970's and 1980's games; for instance, Avalanche Press has republished the 1974 Avalon Hill classic ''Third Reich'' and paired it with an original design, ''The Great Pacific War'', covering the war in East Asia and the Pacific, which uses the same system as ''Third Reich'' and can be mated with the European game to present the entirety of World War II. Decision Games, which now owns the rights to publish SPI's legendary ''Strategy and Tactics'' magazine-with-game, publishes the magazine on a bimonthly basis, along with two other similar magazines with a more specific focus; ''World at War'', specializing in World War II, and ''Modern War'', focusing on contemporary and near-future conflict. Both of these magazines, like S&T, are available in magazine-only versions as well as versions with game supplements.

to:

Since circa 2000, the board wargaming hobby has enjoyed something of a renaissance due, in part, to the revived popularity of tabletop games. Just as in the 1970's, games range in physical size from "folio" games (Decision Games has published several games that can use as few as 40 counters to represent all the units present at a given battle) to "monsters" with thousands of counters and numerous maps (e.g., Compass Games' ''Absolute Victory'', a grand-strategic-level treatment of World War II intended as a revamping and expansion of the Australian Design Group's classic ''World in Flames'', which covers not only the entire Western Hemisphere but even includes a map for Antarctica!). As of the late 2010's, Decision Games (which owns the SPI trademark and the copyrights to most of the classic SPI line), GMT Games, and Compass Games are the leading publishers in the hobby, augmented by smaller publishers such as Avalanche Press and One Small Step Games. These companies both publish new designs and re-print classic 1970's and 1980's games; for instance, Avalanche Press has republished the 1974 Avalon Hill classic ''Third Reich'' and paired it with an original design, ''The Great Pacific War'', covering the war in East Asia and the Pacific, which uses the same system as ''Third Reich'' and can be mated with the European game to present the entirety of World War II. Decision Games, which now owns the rights to publish SPI's legendary ''Strategy and Tactics'' magazine-with-game, publishes the magazine on a bimonthly basis, along with two other similar magazines with a more specific focus; ''World at War'', specializing in World War II, and ''Modern War'', focusing on contemporary and near-future conflict. Both of these magazines, like S&T, are available in magazine-only versions as well as versions with game supplements.


Since circa 2000, the board wargaming hobby has enjoyed something of a renaissance due, in part, to the revived popularity of tabletop games. Currently, Decision Games (which owns the SPI trademark and the copyrights to most of the classic SPI line), GMT Games, and Compass Games are the leading publishers in the hobby, augmented by smaller publishers such as Avalanche Press and One Small Step Games. Decision Games, which now owns the rights to publish SPI's legendary ''Strategy and Tactics'' magazine-with-game, publishes the magazine on a bimonthly basis, along with two other similar magazines with a more specific focus; ''World at War'', specializing in World War II, and ''Modern War'', focusing on contemporary and near-future conflict. Both of these magazines, like S&T, are available in magazine-only versions as well as versions with game supplements.

to:

Since circa 2000, the board wargaming hobby has enjoyed something of a renaissance due, in part, to the revived popularity of tabletop games. Currently, As of the late 2010's, Decision Games (which owns the SPI trademark and the copyrights to most of the classic SPI line), GMT Games, and Compass Games are the leading publishers in the hobby, augmented by smaller publishers such as Avalanche Press and One Small Step Games.Games. These companies both publish new designs and re-print classic 1970's and 1980's games; for instance, Avalanche Press has republished the 1974 Avalon Hill classic ''Third Reich'' and paired it with an original design, ''The Great Pacific War'', covering the war in East Asia and the Pacific, which uses the same system as ''Third Reich'' and can be mated with the European game to present the entirety of World War II. Decision Games, which now owns the rights to publish SPI's legendary ''Strategy and Tactics'' magazine-with-game, publishes the magazine on a bimonthly basis, along with two other similar magazines with a more specific focus; ''World at War'', specializing in World War II, and ''Modern War'', focusing on contemporary and near-future conflict. Both of these magazines, like S&T, are available in magazine-only versions as well as versions with game supplements.


Since the early 1980s (and [[UsefulNotes/MainframesAndMinicomputers to a degree, before]]) the advent of [[UsefulNotes/PCVsConsole home computers]] resulted in wargames mostly transitioning to the realm of electronics, since it was much easier to program the often-complex math required to accurately simulate many military events than to try to create tables and charts for table wargames. These games evolved into the genres we now call TurnBasedStrategy and, later still, RealTimeStrategy. Even so, there is still a hard core of dedicated map-and-counter-and-dice wargamers and companies to serve them.

to:

Since the early 1980s (and [[UsefulNotes/MainframesAndMinicomputers to a degree, before]]) the advent of [[UsefulNotes/PCVsConsole home computers]] resulted in wargames mostly transitioning to the realm of electronics, since it was much easier to program the often-complex math required to accurately simulate many military events than to try to create tables and charts for table wargames. These games evolved into the genres we now call TurnBasedStrategy and, later still, RealTimeStrategy. Even so, there is still a hard core of dedicated map-and-counter-and-dice wargamers and companies to serve them.
them, as well as numerous conventions large and small at which gamers can meet to play games and buy and sell them.

Since circa 2000, the board wargaming hobby has enjoyed something of a renaissance due, in part, to the revived popularity of tabletop games. Currently, Decision Games (which owns the SPI trademark and the copyrights to most of the classic SPI line), GMT Games, and Compass Games are the leading publishers in the hobby, augmented by smaller publishers such as Avalanche Press and One Small Step Games. Decision Games, which now owns the rights to publish SPI's legendary ''Strategy and Tactics'' magazine-with-game, publishes the magazine on a bimonthly basis, along with two other similar magazines with a more specific focus; ''World at War'', specializing in World War II, and ''Modern War'', focusing on contemporary and near-future conflict. Both of these magazines, like S&T, are available in magazine-only versions as well as versions with game supplements.

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* ''TabletopGame/StarWarsLegion''


* ''AgeofConquest/AgeofConquest''


A genre of {{tabletop games}} centering around the simulation of warfare, either based on real conflicts or fantasy scenarios. Some games include highly detailed miniatures and maps; however, most games of this genre consist of one or more maps of the theatre of conflict, a variable number of unit counters (small square pieces of heavy cardstock with printed numbers and symbols representing military units, as well as markers of various sorts), and rules with accompanying tables and charts. The most important such table is a "Combat Results Table", giving a set of battle results calculated according to the numerical odds of attacker versus defender; the players roll UsefulNotes/{{dice}} and compare the resulting numbers to the table to see how the battle came out. Table wargames can focus on any level of battle from literally man-to-man combat (e.g., the Squad Leader series) to whole army groups or fleets. {{Expansion Pack}}s with different scenarios are also common.

to:

A genre of {{tabletop games}} centering around the simulation of warfare, either based on either real conflicts or fantasy scenarios. Some games include highly detailed miniatures and maps; however, most games of this genre consist of one or more maps of the theatre of conflict, a variable number of unit counters (small square pieces of heavy cardstock with printed numbers and symbols representing military units, as well as markers of various sorts), and rules with accompanying tables and charts. The most important such table is a "Combat Results Table", giving a set of battle results calculated according to the numerical odds of attacker versus defender; the players roll UsefulNotes/{{dice}} and compare the resulting numbers to the table to see how the battle came out. Table wargames can focus on any level of battle from literally man-to-man combat (e.g., the Squad Leader series) to whole army groups or fleets. {{Expansion Pack}}s with different scenarios are also common.


* ''Age of Conquest/AgeofConquest''

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* ''Age of Conquest/AgeofConquest''''AgeofConquest/AgeofConquest''


* ''AgeofConquest/Age of Conquest''

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* ''AgeofConquest/Age ''Age of Conquest''Conquest/AgeofConquest''

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